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Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and cause-specific mortality in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2020 04; 198:105612.JS

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with higher all-cause mortality, but associations with specific causes of death are unclear. We investigated the association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration and cause-specific mortality using a case-cohort study within the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (MCCS). Eligibility for the case-cohort study was restricted to participants with baseline dried blood spot samples and no pre-baseline diagnosis of cancer. These analyses included participants who died (n = 2307) during a mean follow-up of 14 years and a sex-stratified random sample of eligible cohort participants ('subcohort', n = 2923). Concentration of 25(OH)D was measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Cox regression, with Barlow weights and robust standard errors to account for the case-cohort design, was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for cause-specific mortality in relation to 25(OH)D concentration with adjustment for confounders. Circulating 25(OH)D concentration was inversely associated with risk of death due to cancer (HR per 25 nmol/L increment = 0.88, 95 % CI 0.78-0.99), particularly colorectal cancer (HR = 0.75, 95 % CI 0.57-0.99). Higher 25(OH)D concentrations were also associated with a lower risk of death due to diseases of the respiratory system (HR = 0.62, 95 % CI 0.43-0.88), particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR = 0.53, 95 % CI 0.30-0.94), and diseases of the digestive system (HR = 0.44, 95 % CI 0.26-0.76). Estimates for diabetes mortality (HR = 0.64, 95 % CI 0.33-1.26) and cardiovascular disease mortality (HR = 0.90, 95 % CI 0.76-1.07) lacked precision. The findings suggest that vitamin D might be important for preventing death due to some cancers, respiratory diseases, and digestive diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK; Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: a.heath@imperial.ac.uk.Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Cancer Epidemiology Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: Allison.Hodge@cancervic.org.au.Department of Medicine, School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: peter.ebeling@monash.edu.Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia.Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research, the Park Centre for Mental Health, Wacol, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: d.eyles@uq.edu.au.Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Cancer Epidemiology Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Precision Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: Graham.Giles@cancervic.org.au.Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Cancer Epidemiology Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: d.english@unimelb.edu.au.Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Medical Statistics, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK. Electronic address: Elizabeth.Williamson@lshtm.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32007563

Citation

Heath, Alicia K., et al. "Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Cause-specific Mortality in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study." The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, vol. 198, 2020, p. 105612.
Heath AK, Hodge AM, Ebeling PR, et al. Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and cause-specific mortality in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2020;198:105612.
Heath, A. K., Hodge, A. M., Ebeling, P. R., Kvaskoff, D., Eyles, D. W., Giles, G. G., English, D. R., & Williamson, E. J. (2020). Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and cause-specific mortality in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 198, 105612. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2020.105612
Heath AK, et al. Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Cause-specific Mortality in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2020;198:105612. PubMed PMID: 32007563.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and cause-specific mortality in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. AU - Heath,Alicia K, AU - Hodge,Allison M, AU - Ebeling,Peter R, AU - Kvaskoff,David, AU - Eyles,Darryl W, AU - Giles,Graham G, AU - English,Dallas R, AU - Williamson,Elizabeth J, Y1 - 2020/01/30/ PY - 2019/08/19/received PY - 2020/01/02/revised PY - 2020/01/29/accepted PY - 2020/2/3/pubmed PY - 2020/8/13/medline PY - 2020/2/3/entrez KW - 25-hydroxyvitamin D KW - Cancer mortality KW - Cardiovascular mortality KW - Mortality KW - Respiratory disease mortality KW - Vitamin D SP - 105612 EP - 105612 JF - The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology JO - J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol VL - 198 N2 - Vitamin D deficiency is associated with higher all-cause mortality, but associations with specific causes of death are unclear. We investigated the association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration and cause-specific mortality using a case-cohort study within the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study (MCCS). Eligibility for the case-cohort study was restricted to participants with baseline dried blood spot samples and no pre-baseline diagnosis of cancer. These analyses included participants who died (n = 2307) during a mean follow-up of 14 years and a sex-stratified random sample of eligible cohort participants ('subcohort', n = 2923). Concentration of 25(OH)D was measured using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Cox regression, with Barlow weights and robust standard errors to account for the case-cohort design, was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for cause-specific mortality in relation to 25(OH)D concentration with adjustment for confounders. Circulating 25(OH)D concentration was inversely associated with risk of death due to cancer (HR per 25 nmol/L increment = 0.88, 95 % CI 0.78-0.99), particularly colorectal cancer (HR = 0.75, 95 % CI 0.57-0.99). Higher 25(OH)D concentrations were also associated with a lower risk of death due to diseases of the respiratory system (HR = 0.62, 95 % CI 0.43-0.88), particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR = 0.53, 95 % CI 0.30-0.94), and diseases of the digestive system (HR = 0.44, 95 % CI 0.26-0.76). Estimates for diabetes mortality (HR = 0.64, 95 % CI 0.33-1.26) and cardiovascular disease mortality (HR = 0.90, 95 % CI 0.76-1.07) lacked precision. The findings suggest that vitamin D might be important for preventing death due to some cancers, respiratory diseases, and digestive diseases. SN - 1879-1220 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32007563/Circulating_25_hydroxyvitamin_D_concentration_and_cause_specific_mortality_in_the_Melbourne_Collaborative_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0960-0760(19)30484-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -