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Short chain fatty acids in inflammatory bowel disease. The effect of bacterial fermentation of blood.
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1988 Nov; 48(7):667-71.SJ

Abstract

An in vitro faecal incubation system was used to investigate how blood added to faeces influences short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. The result was a change in SCFA pattern from one largely dominated by acetate and propionate to a pattern less dominated by these two acids but with greater amounts of longer and branched SCFA (butyrate, isobutyrate, valerate and isovalerate). Patients with active ulcerative colitis revealed variable concentrations of SCFA in their individual stool specimens, 66% of the samples being outside the 95% confidence interval set by a control group and without any specific trend. The SCFA concentrations were normal in patients with Crohn's disease of the colon. The study concludes that the changes in SCFA pattern seen elsewhere in studies on ulcerative colitis could be due to bacterial fermentation of blood either in the colon or in the stools after passing. It cautions against using faecal concentrations in this disease without due regard to the phenomenon of dilution or pollution of the colonic chymus by colonic effusion of blood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3201099

Citation

Holtug, K, et al. "Short Chain Fatty Acids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. the Effect of Bacterial Fermentation of Blood." Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, vol. 48, no. 7, 1988, pp. 667-71.
Holtug K, Rasmussen HS, Mortensen PB. Short chain fatty acids in inflammatory bowel disease. The effect of bacterial fermentation of blood. Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1988;48(7):667-71.
Holtug, K., Rasmussen, H. S., & Mortensen, P. B. (1988). Short chain fatty acids in inflammatory bowel disease. The effect of bacterial fermentation of blood. Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, 48(7), 667-71.
Holtug K, Rasmussen HS, Mortensen PB. Short Chain Fatty Acids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. the Effect of Bacterial Fermentation of Blood. Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1988;48(7):667-71. PubMed PMID: 3201099.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Short chain fatty acids in inflammatory bowel disease. The effect of bacterial fermentation of blood. AU - Holtug,K, AU - Rasmussen,H S, AU - Mortensen,P B, PY - 1988/11/1/pubmed PY - 1988/11/1/medline PY - 1988/11/1/entrez SP - 667 EP - 71 JF - Scandinavian journal of clinical and laboratory investigation JO - Scand J Clin Lab Invest VL - 48 IS - 7 N2 - An in vitro faecal incubation system was used to investigate how blood added to faeces influences short chain fatty acid (SCFA) production. The result was a change in SCFA pattern from one largely dominated by acetate and propionate to a pattern less dominated by these two acids but with greater amounts of longer and branched SCFA (butyrate, isobutyrate, valerate and isovalerate). Patients with active ulcerative colitis revealed variable concentrations of SCFA in their individual stool specimens, 66% of the samples being outside the 95% confidence interval set by a control group and without any specific trend. The SCFA concentrations were normal in patients with Crohn's disease of the colon. The study concludes that the changes in SCFA pattern seen elsewhere in studies on ulcerative colitis could be due to bacterial fermentation of blood either in the colon or in the stools after passing. It cautions against using faecal concentrations in this disease without due regard to the phenomenon of dilution or pollution of the colonic chymus by colonic effusion of blood. SN - 0036-5513 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3201099/Short_chain_fatty_acids_in_inflammatory_bowel_disease__The_effect_of_bacterial_fermentation_of_blood_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/blood.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -