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Feeding Ecology Drives Lead Exposure of Facultative and Obligate Avian Scavengers in the Eastern United States.
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2020 Apr; 39(4):882-892.ET

Abstract

Lead poisoning of scavenging birds is a global issue. However, the drivers of lead exposure of avian scavengers have been understood from the perspective of individual species, not cross-taxa assemblages. We analyzed blood (n = 285) and liver (n = 226) lead concentrations of 5 facultative (American crows [Corvus brachyrhynchos], bald eagles [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], golden eagles [Aquila chrysaetos], red-shouldered hawks [Buteo lineatus], and red-tailed hawks [Buteo jamaicensis]) and 2 obligate (black vultures [Coragyps atratus] and turkey vultures [Cathartes aura] avian scavenger species to identify lead exposure patterns. Species and age were significant (α < 0.05) predictors of blood lead exposure of facultative scavengers; species, but not age, was a significant predictor of their liver lead exposure. We detected temporal variations in lead concentrations of facultative scavengers (blood: median = 4.41 µg/dL in spring and summer vs 13.08 µg/dL in autumn and winter; p = <0.001; liver: 0.32 ppm in spring and summer vs median = 4.25 ppm in autumn and winter; p = <0.001). At the species level, we detected between-period differences in blood lead concentrations of bald eagles (p = 0.01) and red-shouldered hawks during the winter (p = 0.001). During summer, obligate scavengers had higher liver lead concentrations than did facultative scavengers (median = 1.76 ppm vs 0.22 ppm; p = <0.001). These data suggest that the feeding ecology of avian scavengers is a determinant of the degree to which they are lead exposed, and they highlight the importance of dietary and behavioral variation in determining lead exposure. Environ Toxicol Chem 2020;39:882-892. © 2020 SETAC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Richmond, Virginia, USA.Conservation Science Global, Cape May, New Jersey, USA.Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.US Geological Survey, Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Boise, Idaho, USA.Department of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA.Wildlife Center of Virginia, Waynesboro, Virginia, USA.Wildlife Center of Virginia, Waynesboro, Virginia, USA.Division of Forestry and Natural Resources, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.US Geological Survey, Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, Boise, Idaho, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32022303

Citation

Slabe, Vincent A., et al. "Feeding Ecology Drives Lead Exposure of Facultative and Obligate Avian Scavengers in the Eastern United States." Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, vol. 39, no. 4, 2020, pp. 882-892.
Slabe VA, Anderson JT, Cooper J, et al. Feeding Ecology Drives Lead Exposure of Facultative and Obligate Avian Scavengers in the Eastern United States. Environ Toxicol Chem. 2020;39(4):882-892.
Slabe, V. A., Anderson, J. T., Cooper, J., Miller, T. A., Brown, B., Wrona, A., Ortiz, P., Buchweitz, J., McRuer, D., Dominguez-Villegas, E., Behmke, S., & Katzner, T. (2020). Feeding Ecology Drives Lead Exposure of Facultative and Obligate Avian Scavengers in the Eastern United States. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 39(4), 882-892. https://doi.org/10.1002/etc.4680
Slabe VA, et al. Feeding Ecology Drives Lead Exposure of Facultative and Obligate Avian Scavengers in the Eastern United States. Environ Toxicol Chem. 2020;39(4):882-892. PubMed PMID: 32022303.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Feeding Ecology Drives Lead Exposure of Facultative and Obligate Avian Scavengers in the Eastern United States. AU - Slabe,Vincent A, AU - Anderson,James T, AU - Cooper,Jeff, AU - Miller,Tricia A, AU - Brown,Bracken, AU - Wrona,Anna, AU - Ortiz,Patricia, AU - Buchweitz,John, AU - McRuer,Dave, AU - Dominguez-Villegas,Ernesto, AU - Behmke,Shannon, AU - Katzner,Todd, Y1 - 2020/03/22/ PY - 2019/12/24/received PY - 2020/01/19/revised PY - 2020/01/28/accepted PY - 2020/2/6/pubmed PY - 2020/2/6/medline PY - 2020/2/6/entrez KW - Avian toxicity KW - Eagle KW - Environmental toxicology KW - Hawk KW - Vulture KW - Wildlife toxicology SP - 882 EP - 892 JF - Environmental toxicology and chemistry JO - Environ. Toxicol. Chem. VL - 39 IS - 4 N2 - Lead poisoning of scavenging birds is a global issue. However, the drivers of lead exposure of avian scavengers have been understood from the perspective of individual species, not cross-taxa assemblages. We analyzed blood (n = 285) and liver (n = 226) lead concentrations of 5 facultative (American crows [Corvus brachyrhynchos], bald eagles [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], golden eagles [Aquila chrysaetos], red-shouldered hawks [Buteo lineatus], and red-tailed hawks [Buteo jamaicensis]) and 2 obligate (black vultures [Coragyps atratus] and turkey vultures [Cathartes aura] avian scavenger species to identify lead exposure patterns. Species and age were significant (α < 0.05) predictors of blood lead exposure of facultative scavengers; species, but not age, was a significant predictor of their liver lead exposure. We detected temporal variations in lead concentrations of facultative scavengers (blood: median = 4.41 µg/dL in spring and summer vs 13.08 µg/dL in autumn and winter; p = <0.001; liver: 0.32 ppm in spring and summer vs median = 4.25 ppm in autumn and winter; p = <0.001). At the species level, we detected between-period differences in blood lead concentrations of bald eagles (p = 0.01) and red-shouldered hawks during the winter (p = 0.001). During summer, obligate scavengers had higher liver lead concentrations than did facultative scavengers (median = 1.76 ppm vs 0.22 ppm; p = <0.001). These data suggest that the feeding ecology of avian scavengers is a determinant of the degree to which they are lead exposed, and they highlight the importance of dietary and behavioral variation in determining lead exposure. Environ Toxicol Chem 2020;39:882-892. © 2020 SETAC. SN - 1552-8618 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32022303/Feeding_Ecology_Drives_Lead_Exposure_of_Facultative_and_Obligate_Avian_Scavengers_in_the_Eastern_United_States DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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