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Emerging 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia.
Radiology. 2020 04; 295(1):210-217.R

Abstract

BackgroundThe chest CT findings of patients with 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) pneumonia have not previously been described in detail.PurposeTo investigate the clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings of emerging 2019-nCoV pneumonia in humans.Materials and MethodsFifty-one patients (25 men and 26 women; age range 16-76 years) with laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection by using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction underwent thin-section CT. The imaging findings, clinical data, and laboratory data were evaluated.ResultsFifty of 51 patients (98%) had a history of contact with individuals from the endemic center in Wuhan, China. Fever (49 of 51, 96%) and cough (24 of 51, 47%) were the most common symptoms. Most patients had a normal white blood cell count (37 of 51, 73%), neutrophil count (44 of 51, 86%), and either normal (17 of 51, 35%) or reduced (33 of 51, 65%) lymphocyte count. CT images showed pure ground-glass opacity (GGO) in 39 of 51 (77%) patients and GGO with reticular and/or interlobular septal thickening in 38 of 51 (75%) patients. GGO with consolidation was present in 30 of 51 (59%) patients, and pure consolidation was present in 28 of 51 (55%) patients. Forty-four of 51 (86%) patients had bilateral lung involvement, while 41 of 51 (80%) involved the posterior part of the lungs and 44 of 51 (86%) were peripheral. There were more consolidated lung lesions in patients 5 days or more from disease onset to CT scan versus 4 days or fewer (431 of 712 lesions vs 129 of 612 lesions; P < .001). Patients older than 50 years had more consolidated lung lesions than did those aged 50 years or younger (212 of 470 vs 198 of 854; P < .001). Follow-up CT in 13 patients showed improvement in seven (54%) patients and progression in four (31%) patients.ConclusionPatients with fever and/or cough and with conspicuous ground-glass opacity lesions in the peripheral and posterior lungs on CT images, combined with normal or decreased white blood cells and a history of epidemic exposure, are highly suspected of having 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) pneumonia.© RSNA, 2020.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Departments of Radiology (F. Song, N.S., F. Shan, Z.Z., J.S., Y.S.) and Infectious Disease (H.L., Y.L.), Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, No. 2501 Caolang Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of the Principal's Office, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Z.Z.); Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich (Y.J.); and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Shanghai, China (Y.S.).From the Departments of Radiology (F. Song, N.S., F. Shan, Z.Z., J.S., Y.S.) and Infectious Disease (H.L., Y.L.), Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, No. 2501 Caolang Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of the Principal's Office, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Z.Z.); Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich (Y.J.); and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Shanghai, China (Y.S.).From the Departments of Radiology (F. Song, N.S., F. Shan, Z.Z., J.S., Y.S.) and Infectious Disease (H.L., Y.L.), Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, No. 2501 Caolang Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of the Principal's Office, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Z.Z.); Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich (Y.J.); and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Shanghai, China (Y.S.).From the Departments of Radiology (F. Song, N.S., F. Shan, Z.Z., J.S., Y.S.) and Infectious Disease (H.L., Y.L.), Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, No. 2501 Caolang Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of the Principal's Office, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Z.Z.); Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich (Y.J.); and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Shanghai, China (Y.S.).From the Departments of Radiology (F. Song, N.S., F. Shan, Z.Z., J.S., Y.S.) and Infectious Disease (H.L., Y.L.), Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, No. 2501 Caolang Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of the Principal's Office, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Z.Z.); Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich (Y.J.); and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Shanghai, China (Y.S.).From the Departments of Radiology (F. Song, N.S., F. Shan, Z.Z., J.S., Y.S.) and Infectious Disease (H.L., Y.L.), Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, No. 2501 Caolang Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of the Principal's Office, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Z.Z.); Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich (Y.J.); and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Shanghai, China (Y.S.).From the Departments of Radiology (F. Song, N.S., F. Shan, Z.Z., J.S., Y.S.) and Infectious Disease (H.L., Y.L.), Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, No. 2501 Caolang Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of the Principal's Office, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Z.Z.); Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich (Y.J.); and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Shanghai, China (Y.S.).From the Departments of Radiology (F. Song, N.S., F. Shan, Z.Z., J.S., Y.S.) and Infectious Disease (H.L., Y.L.), Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, No. 2501 Caolang Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of the Principal's Office, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Z.Z.); Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich (Y.J.); and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Shanghai, China (Y.S.).From the Departments of Radiology (F. Song, N.S., F. Shan, Z.Z., J.S., Y.S.) and Infectious Disease (H.L., Y.L.), Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center, No. 2501 Caolang Road, Jinshan District, Shanghai 201508, China; Department of the Principal's Office, Fudan University, Shanghai, China (Z.Z.); Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich (Y.J.); and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Shanghai, China (Y.S.).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32027573

Citation

Song, Fengxiang, et al. "Emerging 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia." Radiology, vol. 295, no. 1, 2020, pp. 210-217.
Song F, Shi N, Shan F, et al. Emerging 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia. Radiology. 2020;295(1):210-217.
Song, F., Shi, N., Shan, F., Zhang, Z., Shen, J., Lu, H., Ling, Y., Jiang, Y., & Shi, Y. (2020). Emerging 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia. Radiology, 295(1), 210-217. https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2020200274
Song F, et al. Emerging 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia. Radiology. 2020;295(1):210-217. PubMed PMID: 32027573.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Emerging 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Pneumonia. AU - Song,Fengxiang, AU - Shi,Nannan, AU - Shan,Fei, AU - Zhang,Zhiyong, AU - Shen,Jie, AU - Lu,Hongzhou, AU - Ling,Yun, AU - Jiang,Yebin, AU - Shi,Yuxin, Y1 - 2020/02/06/ PY - 2020/2/7/pubmed PY - 2020/3/21/medline PY - 2020/2/7/entrez SP - 210 EP - 217 JF - Radiology JO - Radiology VL - 295 IS - 1 N2 - BackgroundThe chest CT findings of patients with 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) pneumonia have not previously been described in detail.PurposeTo investigate the clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings of emerging 2019-nCoV pneumonia in humans.Materials and MethodsFifty-one patients (25 men and 26 women; age range 16-76 years) with laboratory-confirmed 2019-nCoV infection by using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction underwent thin-section CT. The imaging findings, clinical data, and laboratory data were evaluated.ResultsFifty of 51 patients (98%) had a history of contact with individuals from the endemic center in Wuhan, China. Fever (49 of 51, 96%) and cough (24 of 51, 47%) were the most common symptoms. Most patients had a normal white blood cell count (37 of 51, 73%), neutrophil count (44 of 51, 86%), and either normal (17 of 51, 35%) or reduced (33 of 51, 65%) lymphocyte count. CT images showed pure ground-glass opacity (GGO) in 39 of 51 (77%) patients and GGO with reticular and/or interlobular septal thickening in 38 of 51 (75%) patients. GGO with consolidation was present in 30 of 51 (59%) patients, and pure consolidation was present in 28 of 51 (55%) patients. Forty-four of 51 (86%) patients had bilateral lung involvement, while 41 of 51 (80%) involved the posterior part of the lungs and 44 of 51 (86%) were peripheral. There were more consolidated lung lesions in patients 5 days or more from disease onset to CT scan versus 4 days or fewer (431 of 712 lesions vs 129 of 612 lesions; P < .001). Patients older than 50 years had more consolidated lung lesions than did those aged 50 years or younger (212 of 470 vs 198 of 854; P < .001). Follow-up CT in 13 patients showed improvement in seven (54%) patients and progression in four (31%) patients.ConclusionPatients with fever and/or cough and with conspicuous ground-glass opacity lesions in the peripheral and posterior lungs on CT images, combined with normal or decreased white blood cells and a history of epidemic exposure, are highly suspected of having 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) pneumonia.© RSNA, 2020. SN - 1527-1315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32027573/Emerging_2019_Novel_Coronavirus__2019_nCoV__Pneumonia_ L2 - https://pubs.rsna.org/doi/10.1148/radiol.2020200274?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -