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Cell types and cell circuits in human and non-human primate retina.
Prog Retin Eye Res. 2020 Feb 05 [Online ahead of print]PR

Abstract

This review summarizes our current knowledge of primate including human retina focusing on bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells and their connectivity. We have two main motivations in writing. Firstly, recent progress in non-invasive imaging methods to study retinal diseases mean that better understanding of the primate retina is becoming an important goal both for basic and for clinical sciences. Secondly, genetically modified mice are increasingly used as animal models for human retinal diseases. Thus, it is important to understand to which extent the retinas of primates and rodents are comparable. We first compare cell populations in primate and rodent retinas, with emphasis on how the fovea (despite its small size) dominates the neural landscape of primate retina. We next summarise what is known, and what is not known, about the postreceptoral neurone populations in primate retina. The inventories of bipolar and ganglion cells in primates are now nearing completion, comprising ~12 types of bipolar cell and at least 17 types of ganglion cell. Primate ganglion cells show clear differences in dendritic field size across the retina, and their morphology differs clearly from that of mouse retinal ganglion cells. Compared to bipolar and ganglion cells, amacrine cells show even higher morphological diversity: they could comprise over 40 types. Many amacrine types appear conserved between primates and mice, but functions of only a few types are understood in any primate or non-primate retina. Amacrine cells appear as the final frontier for retinal research in monkeys and mice alike.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The University of Sydney, Save Sight Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Sydney, NSW, 2000, Australia; Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function, Sydney Node, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2000, Australia. Electronic address: ulrike.grunert@sydney.edu.au.The University of Sydney, Save Sight Institute, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Sydney, NSW, 2000, Australia; Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function, Sydney Node, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2000, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32032773

Citation

Grünert, Ulrike, and Paul R. Martin. "Cell Types and Cell Circuits in Human and Non-human Primate Retina." Progress in Retinal and Eye Research, 2020, p. 100844.
Grünert U, Martin PR. Cell types and cell circuits in human and non-human primate retina. Prog Retin Eye Res. 2020.
Grünert, U., & Martin, P. R. (2020). Cell types and cell circuits in human and non-human primate retina. Progress in Retinal and Eye Research, 100844. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.preteyeres.2020.100844
Grünert U, Martin PR. Cell Types and Cell Circuits in Human and Non-human Primate Retina. Prog Retin Eye Res. 2020 Feb 5;100844. PubMed PMID: 32032773.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cell types and cell circuits in human and non-human primate retina. AU - Grünert,Ulrike, AU - Martin,Paul R, Y1 - 2020/02/05/ PY - 2019/11/19/received PY - 2020/01/28/revised PY - 2020/01/31/accepted PY - 2020/2/8/pubmed PY - 2020/2/8/medline PY - 2020/2/8/entrez KW - Amacrine cells KW - Bipolar cells KW - Ganglion cells KW - Human retina KW - Mouse retina KW - Non-human primate retina KW - Retinal circuitry SP - 100844 EP - 100844 JF - Progress in retinal and eye research JO - Prog Retin Eye Res N2 - This review summarizes our current knowledge of primate including human retina focusing on bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells and their connectivity. We have two main motivations in writing. Firstly, recent progress in non-invasive imaging methods to study retinal diseases mean that better understanding of the primate retina is becoming an important goal both for basic and for clinical sciences. Secondly, genetically modified mice are increasingly used as animal models for human retinal diseases. Thus, it is important to understand to which extent the retinas of primates and rodents are comparable. We first compare cell populations in primate and rodent retinas, with emphasis on how the fovea (despite its small size) dominates the neural landscape of primate retina. We next summarise what is known, and what is not known, about the postreceptoral neurone populations in primate retina. The inventories of bipolar and ganglion cells in primates are now nearing completion, comprising ~12 types of bipolar cell and at least 17 types of ganglion cell. Primate ganglion cells show clear differences in dendritic field size across the retina, and their morphology differs clearly from that of mouse retinal ganglion cells. Compared to bipolar and ganglion cells, amacrine cells show even higher morphological diversity: they could comprise over 40 types. Many amacrine types appear conserved between primates and mice, but functions of only a few types are understood in any primate or non-primate retina. Amacrine cells appear as the final frontier for retinal research in monkeys and mice alike. SN - 1873-1635 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32032773/Cell_types_and_cell_circuits_in_human_and_non-human_primate_retina L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1350-9462(20)30016-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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