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Brain activity underlying American crow processing of encounters with dead conspecifics.
Behav Brain Res. 2020 May 15; 385:112546.BB

Abstract

Animals utilize a variety of auditory and visual cues to navigate the landscape of fear. For some species, including corvids, dead conspecifics appear to act as one such visual cue of danger, and prompt alarm calling by attending conspecifics. Which brain regions mediate responses to dead conspecifics, and how this compares to other threats, has so far only been speculative. Using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) we contrast the metabolic response to visual and auditory cues associated with a dead conspecific among five a priori selected regions in the American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) brain: the hippocampus, nidopallium caudolaterale, striatum, amygdala, and the septum. Using a repeated-measures, fully balanced approach, we exposed crows to four stimuli: a dead conspecific, a dead song sparrow (Melospiza melodia), conspecific alarm calls given in response to a dead crow, and conspecific food begging calls. We find that in response to observations of a dead crow, crows show significant activity in areas associated with higher-order decision-making (NCL), but not in areas associated with social behaviors or fear learning. We do not find strong differences in activation between hearing alarm calls and food begging calls; both activate the NCL. Lastly, repeated exposures to negative stimuli had a marginal effect on later increasing the subjects' brain activity in response to control stimuli, suggesting that crows might quickly learn from negative experiences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States. Electronic address: kaelis@uw.edu.School of Environmental and Forest Sciences, Seattle, WA, United States.Department of Biology, Pacific University Oregon, Forest Grove, OR, United States.Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, United States.Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32035868

Citation

Swift, Kaeli N., et al. "Brain Activity Underlying American Crow Processing of Encounters With Dead Conspecifics." Behavioural Brain Research, vol. 385, 2020, p. 112546.
Swift KN, Marzluff JM, Templeton CN, et al. Brain activity underlying American crow processing of encounters with dead conspecifics. Behav Brain Res. 2020;385:112546.
Swift, K. N., Marzluff, J. M., Templeton, C. N., Shimizu, T., & Cross, D. J. (2020). Brain activity underlying American crow processing of encounters with dead conspecifics. Behavioural Brain Research, 385, 112546. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2020.112546
Swift KN, et al. Brain Activity Underlying American Crow Processing of Encounters With Dead Conspecifics. Behav Brain Res. 2020 May 15;385:112546. PubMed PMID: 32035868.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brain activity underlying American crow processing of encounters with dead conspecifics. AU - Swift,Kaeli N, AU - Marzluff,John M, AU - Templeton,Christopher N, AU - Shimizu,Toru, AU - Cross,Donna J, Y1 - 2020/02/06/ PY - 2019/09/03/received PY - 2020/02/05/revised PY - 2020/02/05/accepted PY - 2020/2/10/pubmed PY - 2020/2/10/medline PY - 2020/2/10/entrez KW - American crow KW - Comparative thanatology KW - Dead conspecific KW - Functional neuroimaging KW - [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose–PET imaging SP - 112546 EP - 112546 JF - Behavioural brain research JO - Behav. Brain Res. VL - 385 N2 - Animals utilize a variety of auditory and visual cues to navigate the landscape of fear. For some species, including corvids, dead conspecifics appear to act as one such visual cue of danger, and prompt alarm calling by attending conspecifics. Which brain regions mediate responses to dead conspecifics, and how this compares to other threats, has so far only been speculative. Using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) we contrast the metabolic response to visual and auditory cues associated with a dead conspecific among five a priori selected regions in the American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) brain: the hippocampus, nidopallium caudolaterale, striatum, amygdala, and the septum. Using a repeated-measures, fully balanced approach, we exposed crows to four stimuli: a dead conspecific, a dead song sparrow (Melospiza melodia), conspecific alarm calls given in response to a dead crow, and conspecific food begging calls. We find that in response to observations of a dead crow, crows show significant activity in areas associated with higher-order decision-making (NCL), but not in areas associated with social behaviors or fear learning. We do not find strong differences in activation between hearing alarm calls and food begging calls; both activate the NCL. Lastly, repeated exposures to negative stimuli had a marginal effect on later increasing the subjects' brain activity in response to control stimuli, suggesting that crows might quickly learn from negative experiences. SN - 1872-7549 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32035868/Brain_activity_underlying_American_crow_processing_of_encounters_with_dead_conspecifics L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0166-4328(19)31178-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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