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The Bacillus Subtilis K-State Promotes Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis via Oxidative Damage.
Genes (Basel). 2020 02 11; 11(2)G

Abstract

Bacterial cells develop mutations in the absence of cellular division through a process known as stationary-phase or stress-induced mutagenesis. This phenomenon has been studied in a few bacterial models, including Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis; however, the underlying mechanisms between these systems differ. For instance, RecA is not required for stationary-phase mutagenesis in B. subtilis like it is in E. coli. In B. subtilis, RecA is essential to the process of genetic transformation in the subpopulation of cells that become naturally competent in conditions of stress. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator ComK, which controls the development of competence, does influence the accumulation of mutations in stationary phase in B. subtilis. Since recombination is not involved in this process even though ComK is, we investigated if the development of a subpopulation (K-cells) could be involved in stationary-phase mutagenesis. Using genetic knockout strains and a point-mutation reversion system, we investigated the effects of ComK, ComEA (a protein involved in DNA transport during transformation), and oxidative damage on stationary-phase mutagenesis. We found that stationary-phase revertants were more likely to have undergone the development of competence than the background of non-revertant cells, mutations accumulated independently of DNA uptake, and the presence of exogenous oxidants potentiated mutagenesis in K-cells. Therefore, the development of the K-state creates conditions favorable to an increase in the genetic diversity of the population not only through exogenous DNA uptake but also through stationary-phase mutagenesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA.University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA.University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA.University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA.Department of Biology, Division of Natural and Exact Sciences, University of Guanajuato, P.O. Box 187, Guanajuato, Gto. 36050, Mexico.University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32053972

Citation

Martin, Holly A., et al. "The Bacillus Subtilis K-State Promotes Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis Via Oxidative Damage." Genes, vol. 11, no. 2, 2020.
Martin HA, Kidman AA, Socea J, et al. The Bacillus Subtilis K-State Promotes Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis via Oxidative Damage. Genes (Basel). 2020;11(2).
Martin, H. A., Kidman, A. A., Socea, J., Vallin, C., Pedraza-Reyes, M., & Robleto, E. A. (2020). The Bacillus Subtilis K-State Promotes Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis via Oxidative Damage. Genes, 11(2). https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11020190
Martin HA, et al. The Bacillus Subtilis K-State Promotes Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis Via Oxidative Damage. Genes (Basel). 2020 02 11;11(2) PubMed PMID: 32053972.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Bacillus Subtilis K-State Promotes Stationary-Phase Mutagenesis via Oxidative Damage. AU - Martin,Holly A, AU - Kidman,Amanda A, AU - Socea,Jillian, AU - Vallin,Carmen, AU - Pedraza-Reyes,Mario, AU - Robleto,Eduardo A, Y1 - 2020/02/11/ PY - 2020/01/01/received PY - 2020/02/05/revised PY - 2020/02/06/accepted PY - 2020/2/15/entrez PY - 2020/2/15/pubmed PY - 2020/2/15/medline KW - ComEA KW - ComK KW - Competence KW - K-state KW - stationary-phase mutagenesis JF - Genes JO - Genes (Basel) VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - Bacterial cells develop mutations in the absence of cellular division through a process known as stationary-phase or stress-induced mutagenesis. This phenomenon has been studied in a few bacterial models, including Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis; however, the underlying mechanisms between these systems differ. For instance, RecA is not required for stationary-phase mutagenesis in B. subtilis like it is in E. coli. In B. subtilis, RecA is essential to the process of genetic transformation in the subpopulation of cells that become naturally competent in conditions of stress. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator ComK, which controls the development of competence, does influence the accumulation of mutations in stationary phase in B. subtilis. Since recombination is not involved in this process even though ComK is, we investigated if the development of a subpopulation (K-cells) could be involved in stationary-phase mutagenesis. Using genetic knockout strains and a point-mutation reversion system, we investigated the effects of ComK, ComEA (a protein involved in DNA transport during transformation), and oxidative damage on stationary-phase mutagenesis. We found that stationary-phase revertants were more likely to have undergone the development of competence than the background of non-revertant cells, mutations accumulated independently of DNA uptake, and the presence of exogenous oxidants potentiated mutagenesis in K-cells. Therefore, the development of the K-state creates conditions favorable to an increase in the genetic diversity of the population not only through exogenous DNA uptake but also through stationary-phase mutagenesis. SN - 2073-4425 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32053972/The_Bacillus_Subtilis_K-State_Promotes_Stationary-Phase_Mutagenesis_via_Oxidative_Damage L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=genes11020190 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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