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Influence of front-of-pack labelling and regulated nutrition claims on consumers' perceptions of product healthfulness and purchase intentions: A randomized controlled trial.
Appetite. 2020 06 01; 149:104629.A

Abstract

Mandatory front-of-pack (FOP) labelling was proposed in Canada to highlight foods with high contents of sugars, sodium and/or saturated fats, which would be displayed on labels along with the mandatory Nutrition Facts table and voluntary nutrition claims. In an online survey, participants (n = 1997) were randomized to one of four FOP labelling conditions: 1) control, 2) warning label, 3) health star rating or 4) traffic light labelling. Participants were shown four drinks (a healthier drink with or without a disease risk reduction claim, a healthier drink with or without a nutrient content claim, a less healthy drink with or without a disease risk reduction claim and a less healthy drink with or without a nutrient content claim) in random order and one at a time. Participants rated perceived product healthfulness and purchase intentions using a 7-point Likert scale. Participants could access the Nutrition Facts table while viewing labels. Results showed less healthy drinks displaying any FOP labelling were perceived as less healthy compared to the control. In healthier drinks, health star rating and traffic light labelling created a 'halo' effect, which was not observed with warning labels. Similar results were observed with purchase intentions. Drinks displaying a disease risk reduction claim were perceived as healthier than those without (p < 0.001) regardless of product's healthfulness. The effect of a nutrient content claim was not significantly different. The effect of FOP labelling and claims was mitigated for those who used the Nutrition Facts table. FOP labelling was likely helpful for consumers with different levels of health literacy. Overall, FOP labelling had significantly stronger influence than nutrition claims on consumers' perceptions; however, the effect of each FOP label varied on healthier and less healthy drinks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Medical Sciences Building, 1 King's College Circle Rm 5368, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8, Canada. Electronic address: beatriz.francoarellano@mail.utoronto.ca.Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Medical Sciences Building, 1 King's College Circle Rm 5368, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8, Canada; School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1, Canada. Electronic address: lana.vanderlee@uwaterloo.ca.Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Medical Sciences Building, 1 King's College Circle Rm 5368, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8, Canada. Electronic address: mavra.ahmed@mail.utoronto.ca.Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Medical Sciences Building, 1 King's College Circle Rm 5368, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8, Canada; Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa, 57 Louis Pasteur St, Ottawa, Ontario, K1N 6N5, Canada. Electronic address: yeonji.oh@mail.utoronto.ca.Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Medical Sciences Building, 1 King's College Circle Rm 5368, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A8, Canada. Electronic address: mary.labbe@utoronto.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32061707

Citation

Franco-Arellano, Beatriz, et al. "Influence of Front-of-pack Labelling and Regulated Nutrition Claims On Consumers' Perceptions of Product Healthfulness and Purchase Intentions: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Appetite, vol. 149, 2020, p. 104629.
Franco-Arellano B, Vanderlee L, Ahmed M, et al. Influence of front-of-pack labelling and regulated nutrition claims on consumers' perceptions of product healthfulness and purchase intentions: A randomized controlled trial. Appetite. 2020;149:104629.
Franco-Arellano, B., Vanderlee, L., Ahmed, M., Oh, A., & L'Abbé, M. (2020). Influence of front-of-pack labelling and regulated nutrition claims on consumers' perceptions of product healthfulness and purchase intentions: A randomized controlled trial. Appetite, 149, 104629. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2020.104629
Franco-Arellano B, et al. Influence of Front-of-pack Labelling and Regulated Nutrition Claims On Consumers' Perceptions of Product Healthfulness and Purchase Intentions: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Appetite. 2020 06 1;149:104629. PubMed PMID: 32061707.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influence of front-of-pack labelling and regulated nutrition claims on consumers' perceptions of product healthfulness and purchase intentions: A randomized controlled trial. AU - Franco-Arellano,Beatriz, AU - Vanderlee,Lana, AU - Ahmed,Mavra, AU - Oh,Angela, AU - L'Abbé,Mary, Y1 - 2020/02/12/ PY - 2019/07/19/received PY - 2020/02/03/revised PY - 2020/02/09/accepted PY - 2020/2/18/pubmed PY - 2021/3/17/medline PY - 2020/2/17/entrez KW - Canada KW - Consumers' perceptions KW - Food labels KW - Front-of-pack labeling KW - Nutrition claims SP - 104629 EP - 104629 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 149 N2 - Mandatory front-of-pack (FOP) labelling was proposed in Canada to highlight foods with high contents of sugars, sodium and/or saturated fats, which would be displayed on labels along with the mandatory Nutrition Facts table and voluntary nutrition claims. In an online survey, participants (n = 1997) were randomized to one of four FOP labelling conditions: 1) control, 2) warning label, 3) health star rating or 4) traffic light labelling. Participants were shown four drinks (a healthier drink with or without a disease risk reduction claim, a healthier drink with or without a nutrient content claim, a less healthy drink with or without a disease risk reduction claim and a less healthy drink with or without a nutrient content claim) in random order and one at a time. Participants rated perceived product healthfulness and purchase intentions using a 7-point Likert scale. Participants could access the Nutrition Facts table while viewing labels. Results showed less healthy drinks displaying any FOP labelling were perceived as less healthy compared to the control. In healthier drinks, health star rating and traffic light labelling created a 'halo' effect, which was not observed with warning labels. Similar results were observed with purchase intentions. Drinks displaying a disease risk reduction claim were perceived as healthier than those without (p < 0.001) regardless of product's healthfulness. The effect of a nutrient content claim was not significantly different. The effect of FOP labelling and claims was mitigated for those who used the Nutrition Facts table. FOP labelling was likely helpful for consumers with different levels of health literacy. Overall, FOP labelling had significantly stronger influence than nutrition claims on consumers' perceptions; however, the effect of each FOP label varied on healthier and less healthy drinks. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32061707/Influence_of_front_of_pack_labelling_and_regulated_nutrition_claims_on_consumers'_perceptions_of_product_healthfulness_and_purchase_intentions:_A_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(19)30909-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -