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Concordance of Mini-Mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment in the classification of cognitive performance in Parkinson's disease.
J Neurol Sci. 2020 May 15; 412:116735.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Cognitive impairment (CI) is frequently observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) and negatively influences the patient's and carer's quality of life. As a first step, assessment of CI is often accomplished by using screening instruments (level I diagnosis). Three commonly used instruments are the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment (PANDA). Because different preferences regarding test selection exist between clinics, this study aims to provide evidence about the concordance of these tests. It also converts total test scores of the three instruments to assist clinical practice.

METHODS

Between January and December 2018, 96 patients with idiopathic PD were examined at the University Hospital of Cologne, Germany. Comparability of MMSE, MoCA, and PANDA scores was investigated by calculating correlations, classification agreements, and percentile ranks. Additionally, we converted test scores among the three screening instruments by implementing the equipercentile equating method and log-linear smoothing.

RESULTS

The MMSE classified 26%, the PANDA 32.3% and the MoCA 54.2% of PD patients as having CI. The screening instruments' concordance in classifying cognition into normal cognition versus CI was 75% (AC1 = 0.62) for MMSE and PANDA, 63.5% (AC1 = 0.28) for MoCA and PANDA, and 57.3% (AC1 = 0.24) for MMSE and MoCA. The provided conversion table enables a quick and easy transformation of the three screening instruments within PD diagnostics.

CONCLUSION

These results contribute to a better understanding of the screenings' utility and concordance in a population of PD patients. Additionally, communication between clinics may be enhanced.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinic and Polyclinic for Neurology, University Hospital Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.Cologne University of Applied Sciences, faculty: Economics and Law, Cologne, Germany.Medical Psychology | Neuropsychology and Gender Studies & Centrum for Neuropsychological Diagnostics and Intervention (CeNDI), Medical Faculty and University Hospital Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. Electronic address: elke.kalbe@uk-koeln.de.Clinic and Polyclinic for Neurology, University Hospital Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32087430

Citation

Scheffels, Jannik Florian, et al. "Concordance of Mini-Mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment in the Classification of Cognitive Performance in Parkinson's Disease." Journal of the Neurological Sciences, vol. 412, 2020, p. 116735.
Scheffels JF, Fröhlich L, Kalbe E, et al. Concordance of Mini-Mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment in the classification of cognitive performance in Parkinson's disease. J Neurol Sci. 2020;412:116735.
Scheffels, J. F., Fröhlich, L., Kalbe, E., & Kessler, J. (2020). Concordance of Mini-Mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment in the classification of cognitive performance in Parkinson's disease. Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 412, 116735. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2020.116735
Scheffels JF, et al. Concordance of Mini-Mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment in the Classification of Cognitive Performance in Parkinson's Disease. J Neurol Sci. 2020 May 15;412:116735. PubMed PMID: 32087430.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Concordance of Mini-Mental State Examination, Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment in the classification of cognitive performance in Parkinson's disease. AU - Scheffels,Jannik Florian, AU - Fröhlich,Leon, AU - Kalbe,Elke, AU - Kessler,Josef, Y1 - 2020/02/13/ PY - 2019/10/29/received PY - 2020/02/07/revised PY - 2020/02/12/accepted PY - 2020/2/23/pubmed PY - 2021/5/15/medline PY - 2020/2/23/entrez KW - Cognitive screening KW - Concordance KW - Mini-Mental State Examination KW - Montreal Cognitive Assessment KW - Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment KW - Parkinson's disease SP - 116735 EP - 116735 JF - Journal of the neurological sciences JO - J Neurol Sci VL - 412 N2 - BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment (CI) is frequently observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) and negatively influences the patient's and carer's quality of life. As a first step, assessment of CI is often accomplished by using screening instruments (level I diagnosis). Three commonly used instruments are the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and Parkinson Neuropsychometric Dementia Assessment (PANDA). Because different preferences regarding test selection exist between clinics, this study aims to provide evidence about the concordance of these tests. It also converts total test scores of the three instruments to assist clinical practice. METHODS: Between January and December 2018, 96 patients with idiopathic PD were examined at the University Hospital of Cologne, Germany. Comparability of MMSE, MoCA, and PANDA scores was investigated by calculating correlations, classification agreements, and percentile ranks. Additionally, we converted test scores among the three screening instruments by implementing the equipercentile equating method and log-linear smoothing. RESULTS: The MMSE classified 26%, the PANDA 32.3% and the MoCA 54.2% of PD patients as having CI. The screening instruments' concordance in classifying cognition into normal cognition versus CI was 75% (AC1 = 0.62) for MMSE and PANDA, 63.5% (AC1 = 0.28) for MoCA and PANDA, and 57.3% (AC1 = 0.24) for MMSE and MoCA. The provided conversion table enables a quick and easy transformation of the three screening instruments within PD diagnostics. CONCLUSION: These results contribute to a better understanding of the screenings' utility and concordance in a population of PD patients. Additionally, communication between clinics may be enhanced. SN - 1878-5883 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32087430/Concordance_of_Mini_Mental_State_Examination_Montreal_Cognitive_Assessment_and_Parkinson_Neuropsychometric_Dementia_Assessment_in_the_classification_of_cognitive_performance_in_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-510X(20)30071-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -