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Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Long-Term Care Residents with Parkinson's Disease and Comorbid Depression.
Drug Healthc Patient Saf. 2020; 12:23-30.DH

Abstract

Purpose

According to the 2015 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers criteria, most antipsychotics are inappropriate in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients due to the risk of worsening Parkinsonian symptoms. This study examined the incidence and predictors of inappropriate antipsychotic use among long-term care residents with PD and comorbid depression.

Patients and Methods

This retrospective cohort study utilized 2007-2009 Minimum Data Set (MDS) linked to Chronic Condition Warehouse (CCW) Medicare data files involving patients with PD and comorbid depression. Using a 12-month baseline and a 24-month follow-up, the study examined incidence of inappropriate atypical antipsychotics, namely asenapine, brexpiprazole, iloperidone, lurasidone, olanzapine, paliperidone, risperidone, or ziprasidone as specified in the 2015 AGS Beers criteria. Appropriate atypical antipsychotic included aripiprazole, clozapine, or quetiapine. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine various sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with inappropriate antipsychotic use in PD based on the Andersen Behavioral Model.

Results

The incidence of atypical antipsychotic use was 17.50% (13,352/76,294) among PD patients over a 2-year follow-up. The percentage of inappropriate use among atypical antipsychotic users was 36.32%. The likelihood of inappropriate antipsychotic use was higher for patients who had dementia (OR=1.22, 95% CI: 1.12-1.33) or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease ((OR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.03-1.24). However, patients who were taking levodopa (OR=0.62, 95% CI: 0.57-0.67), dopamine agonists (OR=0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.98), Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors (OR=0.77, 95% CI: 0.68-0.86), Monoamine Oxidase (MAO) inhibitors type B (OR=0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.86), or amantadine (OR=0.84, 95% CI: 0.71-0.98) were less likely to receive inappropriate antipsychotics.

Conclusion

More than one-third of PD patients used inappropriate antipsychotics among those who were treated with atypical antipsychotic medications. Various socio-demographics and clinical factors were associated with inappropriate antipsychotic use in older patients with PD. Concerted efforts are needed to reduce inappropriate atypical antipsychotic use among PD patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmaceutical Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5047, USA.Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, McGovern Medical School, Houston, TX 77030, USA.Department of Pharmaceutical Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5047, USA.Department of Pharmaceutical Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5047, USA.Department of Pharmaceutical Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5047, USA.Department of Pharmaceutical Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Pharmacy, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5047, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32099480

Citation

Chekani, Farid, et al. "Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Long-Term Care Residents With Parkinson's Disease and Comorbid Depression." Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, vol. 12, 2020, pp. 23-30.
Chekani F, Holmes HM, Johnson ML, et al. Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Long-Term Care Residents with Parkinson's Disease and Comorbid Depression. Drug Healthc Patient Saf. 2020;12:23-30.
Chekani, F., Holmes, H. M., Johnson, M. L., Chen, H., Sherer, J. T., & Aparasu, R. R. (2020). Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Long-Term Care Residents with Parkinson's Disease and Comorbid Depression. Drug, Healthcare and Patient Safety, 12, 23-30. https://doi.org/10.2147/DHPS.S226486
Chekani F, et al. Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Long-Term Care Residents With Parkinson's Disease and Comorbid Depression. Drug Healthc Patient Saf. 2020;12:23-30. PubMed PMID: 32099480.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of Atypical Antipsychotics in Long-Term Care Residents with Parkinson's Disease and Comorbid Depression. AU - Chekani,Farid, AU - Holmes,Holly M, AU - Johnson,Michael L, AU - Chen,Hua, AU - Sherer,Jeffrey T, AU - Aparasu,Rajender R, Y1 - 2020/01/31/ PY - 2019/08/08/received PY - 2020/01/15/accepted PY - 2020/2/27/entrez PY - 2020/2/27/pubmed PY - 2020/2/27/medline KW - antipsychotic agents KW - psychotic disorders KW - Parkinson disease SP - 23 EP - 30 JF - Drug, healthcare and patient safety JO - Drug Healthc Patient Saf VL - 12 N2 - Purpose: According to the 2015 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Beers criteria, most antipsychotics are inappropriate in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients due to the risk of worsening Parkinsonian symptoms. This study examined the incidence and predictors of inappropriate antipsychotic use among long-term care residents with PD and comorbid depression. Patients and Methods: This retrospective cohort study utilized 2007-2009 Minimum Data Set (MDS) linked to Chronic Condition Warehouse (CCW) Medicare data files involving patients with PD and comorbid depression. Using a 12-month baseline and a 24-month follow-up, the study examined incidence of inappropriate atypical antipsychotics, namely asenapine, brexpiprazole, iloperidone, lurasidone, olanzapine, paliperidone, risperidone, or ziprasidone as specified in the 2015 AGS Beers criteria. Appropriate atypical antipsychotic included aripiprazole, clozapine, or quetiapine. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine various sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with inappropriate antipsychotic use in PD based on the Andersen Behavioral Model. Results: The incidence of atypical antipsychotic use was 17.50% (13,352/76,294) among PD patients over a 2-year follow-up. The percentage of inappropriate use among atypical antipsychotic users was 36.32%. The likelihood of inappropriate antipsychotic use was higher for patients who had dementia (OR=1.22, 95% CI: 1.12-1.33) or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease ((OR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.03-1.24). However, patients who were taking levodopa (OR=0.62, 95% CI: 0.57-0.67), dopamine agonists (OR=0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.98), Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors (OR=0.77, 95% CI: 0.68-0.86), Monoamine Oxidase (MAO) inhibitors type B (OR=0.72, 95% CI: 0.60-0.86), or amantadine (OR=0.84, 95% CI: 0.71-0.98) were less likely to receive inappropriate antipsychotics. Conclusion: More than one-third of PD patients used inappropriate antipsychotics among those who were treated with atypical antipsychotic medications. Various socio-demographics and clinical factors were associated with inappropriate antipsychotic use in older patients with PD. Concerted efforts are needed to reduce inappropriate atypical antipsychotic use among PD patients. SN - 1179-1365 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32099480/Use_of_Atypical_Antipsychotics_in_Long-Term_Care_Residents_with_Parkinson's_Disease_and_Comorbid_Depression DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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