Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Ambient air pollution and gestational diabetes mellitus: A review of evidence from biological mechanisms to population epidemiology.
Sci Total Environ. 2020 Jun 01; 719:137349.ST

Abstract

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a serious complication of pregnancy that could cause adverse health effects on both mothers and fetuses, and its prevalence has been increasing worldwide. Experimental and epidemiological studies suggest that air pollution may be an important risk factor of GDM, but conclusions are inconsistent. To provide a comprehensive overview of ambient air pollution on GDM, we summarized existing evidence concerning biological linkages between maternal exposure to air pollutants and GDM based on mechanism studies. We also performed a quantitative meta-analysis based on human epidemiological studies by searching English databases (Pubmed, Web of Science and Embase) and Chinese databases (Wanfang, CNKI). As a result, the limited mechanism studies indicated that β-cell dysfunction, neurohormonal disturbance, inflammation, oxidative stress, imbalance of gut microbiome and insulin resistance may be involved in air pollution-GDM relationship, but few studies were performed to explore the direct biological linkage. Additionally, a total of 13 epidemiological studies were included in the meta-analysis, and the air pollutants considered included PM2.5, PM10, SO2, NO2 and O3. Most studies were retrospective and mainly conducted in developed regions. The results of meta-analysis indicated that maternal first trimester exposure to SO2 increased the risk of GDM (standardized odds ratio (OR) = 1.392, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.010, 1.773), while pre-pregnancy O3 exposure was inversely associated with GDM risk (standardized OR = 0.981, 95% CI: 0.977, 0.985). No significant effects were observed for PM2.5, PM10 and NO2. In conclusion, additional mechanism studies on the molecular level are needed to provide persuasive rationale underlying the air pollution-GDM relationship. Moreover, other important risk factors of GDM, including maternal lifestyle and road traffic noise exposure that may modify the air pollution-GDM relationship should be considered in future epidemiological studies. More prospective cohort studies are also warranted in developing countries with high levels of air pollution.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, China; School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.National Center for Women and Children's Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China. Electronic address: dijiangli@chinawch.org.cn.School of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, China. Electronic address: zly@zzu.edu.cn.School of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001, China; School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China; Shanghai Typhoon Institute, China Meteorological Administration, Shanghai 200030, China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Meteorology and Health, Shanghai Meteorological Service, Shanghai 200030, China. Electronic address: huangcr@mail.sysu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32114225

Citation

Zhang, Huanhuan, et al. "Ambient Air Pollution and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: a Review of Evidence From Biological Mechanisms to Population Epidemiology." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 719, 2020, p. 137349.
Zhang H, Wang Q, He S, et al. Ambient air pollution and gestational diabetes mellitus: A review of evidence from biological mechanisms to population epidemiology. Sci Total Environ. 2020;719:137349.
Zhang, H., Wang, Q., He, S., Wu, K., Ren, M., Dong, H., Di, J., Yu, Z., & Huang, C. (2020). Ambient air pollution and gestational diabetes mellitus: A review of evidence from biological mechanisms to population epidemiology. The Science of the Total Environment, 719, 137349. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.137349
Zhang H, et al. Ambient Air Pollution and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: a Review of Evidence From Biological Mechanisms to Population Epidemiology. Sci Total Environ. 2020 Jun 1;719:137349. PubMed PMID: 32114225.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ambient air pollution and gestational diabetes mellitus: A review of evidence from biological mechanisms to population epidemiology. AU - Zhang,Huanhuan, AU - Wang,Qiong, AU - He,Simin, AU - Wu,Kaipu, AU - Ren,Meng, AU - Dong,Haotian, AU - Di,Jiangli, AU - Yu,Zengli, AU - Huang,Cunrui, Y1 - 2020/02/15/ PY - 2019/11/27/received PY - 2020/02/06/revised PY - 2020/02/14/accepted PY - 2020/3/3/pubmed PY - 2020/5/7/medline PY - 2020/3/2/entrez KW - Air pollution KW - Biological mechanism KW - Epidemiological study KW - Gestational diabetes mellitus KW - Meta-analysis SP - 137349 EP - 137349 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci. Total Environ. VL - 719 N2 - Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a serious complication of pregnancy that could cause adverse health effects on both mothers and fetuses, and its prevalence has been increasing worldwide. Experimental and epidemiological studies suggest that air pollution may be an important risk factor of GDM, but conclusions are inconsistent. To provide a comprehensive overview of ambient air pollution on GDM, we summarized existing evidence concerning biological linkages between maternal exposure to air pollutants and GDM based on mechanism studies. We also performed a quantitative meta-analysis based on human epidemiological studies by searching English databases (Pubmed, Web of Science and Embase) and Chinese databases (Wanfang, CNKI). As a result, the limited mechanism studies indicated that β-cell dysfunction, neurohormonal disturbance, inflammation, oxidative stress, imbalance of gut microbiome and insulin resistance may be involved in air pollution-GDM relationship, but few studies were performed to explore the direct biological linkage. Additionally, a total of 13 epidemiological studies were included in the meta-analysis, and the air pollutants considered included PM2.5, PM10, SO2, NO2 and O3. Most studies were retrospective and mainly conducted in developed regions. The results of meta-analysis indicated that maternal first trimester exposure to SO2 increased the risk of GDM (standardized odds ratio (OR) = 1.392, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.010, 1.773), while pre-pregnancy O3 exposure was inversely associated with GDM risk (standardized OR = 0.981, 95% CI: 0.977, 0.985). No significant effects were observed for PM2.5, PM10 and NO2. In conclusion, additional mechanism studies on the molecular level are needed to provide persuasive rationale underlying the air pollution-GDM relationship. Moreover, other important risk factors of GDM, including maternal lifestyle and road traffic noise exposure that may modify the air pollution-GDM relationship should be considered in future epidemiological studies. More prospective cohort studies are also warranted in developing countries with high levels of air pollution. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32114225/Ambient_air_pollution_and_gestational_diabetes_mellitus:_A_review_of_evidence_from_biological_mechanisms_to_population_epidemiology_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(20)30859-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -