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Severe megaloblastic anemia: Vitamin deficiency and other causes.
Cleve Clin J Med. 2020 Mar; 87(3):153-164.CC

Abstract

Megaloblastic anemia causes macrocytic anemia from ineffective red blood cell production and intramedullary hemolysis. The most common causes are folate (vitamin B9) deficiency and cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency. Megaloblastic anemia can be diagnosed based on characteristic morphologic and laboratory findings. However, other benign and neoplastic diseases need to be considered, particularly in severe cases. Therapy involves treating the underlying cause-eg, with vitamin supplementation in cases of deficiency, or with discontinuation of a suspected medication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Robert J. Tomsich Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic.Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic.Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology and Department of Translational Hematology and Oncology Research, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic. Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve, Cleveland, OH.Department of Laboratory Medicine, Robert J. Tomsich Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Institute, Cleveland Clinic rogersj5@ccf.org. Assistant Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH rogersj5@ccf.org.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32127439

Citation

Socha, Daniel S., et al. "Severe Megaloblastic Anemia: Vitamin Deficiency and Other Causes." Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine, vol. 87, no. 3, 2020, pp. 153-164.
Socha DS, DeSouza SI, Flagg A, et al. Severe megaloblastic anemia: Vitamin deficiency and other causes. Cleve Clin J Med. 2020;87(3):153-164.
Socha, D. S., DeSouza, S. I., Flagg, A., Sekeres, M., & Rogers, H. J. (2020). Severe megaloblastic anemia: Vitamin deficiency and other causes. Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine, 87(3), 153-164. https://doi.org/10.3949/ccjm.87a.19072
Socha DS, et al. Severe Megaloblastic Anemia: Vitamin Deficiency and Other Causes. Cleve Clin J Med. 2020;87(3):153-164. PubMed PMID: 32127439.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe megaloblastic anemia: Vitamin deficiency and other causes. AU - Socha,Daniel S, AU - DeSouza,Sherwin I, AU - Flagg,Aron, AU - Sekeres,Mikkael, AU - Rogers,Heesun J, PY - 2020/3/5/entrez PY - 2020/3/5/pubmed PY - 2020/12/22/medline SP - 153 EP - 164 JF - Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine JO - Cleve Clin J Med VL - 87 IS - 3 N2 - Megaloblastic anemia causes macrocytic anemia from ineffective red blood cell production and intramedullary hemolysis. The most common causes are folate (vitamin B9) deficiency and cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency. Megaloblastic anemia can be diagnosed based on characteristic morphologic and laboratory findings. However, other benign and neoplastic diseases need to be considered, particularly in severe cases. Therapy involves treating the underlying cause-eg, with vitamin supplementation in cases of deficiency, or with discontinuation of a suspected medication. SN - 1939-2869 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32127439/Severe_megaloblastic_anemia:_Vitamin_deficiency_and_other_causes_ L2 - https://www.ccjm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=32127439 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -