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Adverse Childhood Experiences, Trauma Symptoms, Mindfulness, and Intimate Partner Violence: Therapeutic Implications for Marginalized Men.
Fam Process. 2020 12; 59(4):1588-1607.FP

Abstract

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and trauma symptoms have been linked with intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration and victimization among men, yet the field lacks depth in several key areas hampering progress toward violence intervention. Specifically, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) dominates the field's scope of trauma symptoms under study, limiting understanding of other manifestations of trauma especially among men. Furthermore, most research focuses exclusively on men's physical IPV perpetration and rarely focuses on other types of IPV, severity of violence, or men's victimization. Also, few studies examine potential protective factors grounded in the ACE framework, such as mindfulness, among clinical populations. Finally, most research has not focused on men of color, despite some racial/ethnic minority groups disproportionate rates of IPV exposure. Therefore, the relationships between IPV frequency and severity (psychological, physical, injury) and ACEs, PTSD, trauma symptomology (separate from PTSD), and mindfulness self-efficacy were examined in a sample of 67 predominantly low-income men of color in a batterer intervention program. More than half of the sample (51.5%) reported exposure to four or more ACEs, and 31.1% met the clinical cutoff for a probable PTSD diagnosis. Higher ACE scores predicted increased rates for nearly all types of self-reported IPV perpetration and victimization. PTSD symptoms and complex trauma symptom severity together explained between 13% and 40% of IPV outcomes, and each was uniquely associated with certain types of self-reported IPV victimization and perpetration frequency and severity. Mindfulness self-efficacy was associated with decreased self-report psychological IPV perpetration and victimization frequency and severity. Clinical implications relevant to marginalized men are reviewed, including screening, training, and potential therapeutic interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.Department of Psychology, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32134514

Citation

Voith, Laura A., et al. "Adverse Childhood Experiences, Trauma Symptoms, Mindfulness, and Intimate Partner Violence: Therapeutic Implications for Marginalized Men." Family Process, vol. 59, no. 4, 2020, pp. 1588-1607.
Voith LA, Russell K, Lee H, et al. Adverse Childhood Experiences, Trauma Symptoms, Mindfulness, and Intimate Partner Violence: Therapeutic Implications for Marginalized Men. Fam Process. 2020;59(4):1588-1607.
Voith, L. A., Russell, K., Lee, H., & Anderson, R. E. (2020). Adverse Childhood Experiences, Trauma Symptoms, Mindfulness, and Intimate Partner Violence: Therapeutic Implications for Marginalized Men. Family Process, 59(4), 1588-1607. https://doi.org/10.1111/famp.12533
Voith LA, et al. Adverse Childhood Experiences, Trauma Symptoms, Mindfulness, and Intimate Partner Violence: Therapeutic Implications for Marginalized Men. Fam Process. 2020;59(4):1588-1607. PubMed PMID: 32134514.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adverse Childhood Experiences, Trauma Symptoms, Mindfulness, and Intimate Partner Violence: Therapeutic Implications for Marginalized Men. AU - Voith,Laura A, AU - Russell,Katie, AU - Lee,Hyunjune, AU - Anderson,RaeAnn E, Y1 - 2020/03/05/ PY - 2020/3/7/pubmed PY - 2021/9/3/medline PY - 2020/3/6/entrez KW - Intimate Partner Violence KW - Men KW - Mindfulness KW - Racial Minority KW - Trauma KW - conciencia plena KW - hombres KW - minoría racial KW - trauma KW - violencia de pareja KW - violencia doméstica KW - 亲密伴侣暴力 KW - 创伤 KW - 家庭暴力 KW - 少数民族 KW - 男人 KW - 觉知 SP - 1588 EP - 1607 JF - Family process JO - Fam Process VL - 59 IS - 4 N2 - Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and trauma symptoms have been linked with intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration and victimization among men, yet the field lacks depth in several key areas hampering progress toward violence intervention. Specifically, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) dominates the field's scope of trauma symptoms under study, limiting understanding of other manifestations of trauma especially among men. Furthermore, most research focuses exclusively on men's physical IPV perpetration and rarely focuses on other types of IPV, severity of violence, or men's victimization. Also, few studies examine potential protective factors grounded in the ACE framework, such as mindfulness, among clinical populations. Finally, most research has not focused on men of color, despite some racial/ethnic minority groups disproportionate rates of IPV exposure. Therefore, the relationships between IPV frequency and severity (psychological, physical, injury) and ACEs, PTSD, trauma symptomology (separate from PTSD), and mindfulness self-efficacy were examined in a sample of 67 predominantly low-income men of color in a batterer intervention program. More than half of the sample (51.5%) reported exposure to four or more ACEs, and 31.1% met the clinical cutoff for a probable PTSD diagnosis. Higher ACE scores predicted increased rates for nearly all types of self-reported IPV perpetration and victimization. PTSD symptoms and complex trauma symptom severity together explained between 13% and 40% of IPV outcomes, and each was uniquely associated with certain types of self-reported IPV victimization and perpetration frequency and severity. Mindfulness self-efficacy was associated with decreased self-report psychological IPV perpetration and victimization frequency and severity. Clinical implications relevant to marginalized men are reviewed, including screening, training, and potential therapeutic interventions. SN - 1545-5300 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32134514/Adverse_Childhood_Experiences_Trauma_Symptoms_Mindfulness_and_Intimate_Partner_Violence:_Therapeutic_Implications_for_Marginalized_Men_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -