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County-level jail incarceration and preterm birth among non-Hispanic Black and white U.S. women, 1999-2015.
Soc Sci Med. 2020 Feb 26; 250:112856.SS

Abstract

Jail incarceration is widely prevalent in the United States, with disproportionate impacts on communities of color, yet little research has quantified its health consequences for communities. We assess county-level jail incarceration as a contextual stressor for individual-level preterm birth among non-Hispanic Black and White U.S. women, the vast majority (>99%) of whom were not incarcerated, between 1999 and 2015. We linked county jail incarceration rates to birth certificate data for all births to resident non-Hispanic Black and White U.S. women (N = 41, 911, 094). Using multilevel logistic regression models, we estimated the association between quintiles of county jail incarceration rates and the odds of preterm birth, adjusting for maternal- and county-level covariates and state fixed effects. Women living in counties in the highest quintile of jail incarceration rates had 1.08 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.07-1.09) times greater odds of preterm birth, adjusting for covariates, compared to women living in counties with the lowest quintile of jail incarceration rates. Taken together with other research, these findings suggest policies to lower jail incarceration rates could potentially help prevent preterm birth and other adverse population health consequences of mass incarceration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave., 7th Floor, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: Jaquelyn_jahn@g.harvard.edu.Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave., 7th Floor, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: jarvis@hsph.harvard.edu.Department of Community Health, Tufts University, 574 Boston Avenue, Medford, MA, USA; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tufts Medical Center, 800 Washington St, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: madina.agenor@tufts.edu.Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave., 7th Floor, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: nkrieger@hsph.harvard.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32135460

Citation

Jahn, Jaquelyn L., et al. "County-level Jail Incarceration and Preterm Birth Among non-Hispanic Black and White U.S. Women, 1999-2015." Social Science & Medicine (1982), vol. 250, 2020, p. 112856.
Jahn JL, Chen JT, Agénor M, et al. County-level jail incarceration and preterm birth among non-Hispanic Black and white U.S. women, 1999-2015. Soc Sci Med. 2020;250:112856.
Jahn, J. L., Chen, J. T., Agénor, M., & Krieger, N. (2020). County-level jail incarceration and preterm birth among non-Hispanic Black and white U.S. women, 1999-2015. Social Science & Medicine (1982), 250, 112856. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2020.112856
Jahn JL, et al. County-level Jail Incarceration and Preterm Birth Among non-Hispanic Black and White U.S. Women, 1999-2015. Soc Sci Med. 2020 Feb 26;250:112856. PubMed PMID: 32135460.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - County-level jail incarceration and preterm birth among non-Hispanic Black and white U.S. women, 1999-2015. AU - Jahn,Jaquelyn L, AU - Chen,Jarvis T, AU - Agénor,Madina, AU - Krieger,Nancy, Y1 - 2020/02/26/ PY - 2019/09/25/received PY - 2020/01/09/revised PY - 2020/02/13/accepted PY - 2020/3/7/pubmed PY - 2020/3/7/medline PY - 2020/3/6/entrez KW - Contextual effects KW - Health inequities KW - Mass incarceration KW - Preterm birth SP - 112856 EP - 112856 JF - Social science & medicine (1982) JO - Soc Sci Med VL - 250 N2 - Jail incarceration is widely prevalent in the United States, with disproportionate impacts on communities of color, yet little research has quantified its health consequences for communities. We assess county-level jail incarceration as a contextual stressor for individual-level preterm birth among non-Hispanic Black and White U.S. women, the vast majority (>99%) of whom were not incarcerated, between 1999 and 2015. We linked county jail incarceration rates to birth certificate data for all births to resident non-Hispanic Black and White U.S. women (N = 41, 911, 094). Using multilevel logistic regression models, we estimated the association between quintiles of county jail incarceration rates and the odds of preterm birth, adjusting for maternal- and county-level covariates and state fixed effects. Women living in counties in the highest quintile of jail incarceration rates had 1.08 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.07-1.09) times greater odds of preterm birth, adjusting for covariates, compared to women living in counties with the lowest quintile of jail incarceration rates. Taken together with other research, these findings suggest policies to lower jail incarceration rates could potentially help prevent preterm birth and other adverse population health consequences of mass incarceration. SN - 1873-5347 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32135460/County-level_jail_incarceration_and_preterm_birth_among_non-Hispanic_Black_and_white_U.S._women,_1999-2015 L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0277-9536(20)30075-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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