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Central sensory-motor crosstalk in the neural gut-brain axis.
Auton Neurosci. 2020 Feb 15; 225:102656.AN

Abstract

The neural gut-brain axis consists of viscerosensory and autonomic motor neurons innervating the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Sensory neurons transmit nutrient-related and non-nutrient-related information to the brain, while motor neurons regulate GI motility and secretion. Previous research provides an incomplete picture of the brain nuclei that are directly connected with the neural gut-brain axis, and no studies have thoroughly assessed sensory-motor overlap in those nuclei. Our goal in this study was to comprehensively characterize the central sensory and motor circuitry associated with the neural gut-brain axis linked to a segment of the small intestine. We injected a retrograde (pseudorabies; PRV) and anterograde (herpes simplex virus 1; HSV) transsynaptic viral tracer into the duodenal wall of adult male rats. Immunohistochemical processing revealed single- and double-labeled cells that were quantified per nucleus. We found that across nearly all brain regions assessed, PRV + HSV immunoreactive neurons comprised the greatest percentage of labeled cells compared with single-labeled PRV or HSV neurons. These results indicate that even though sensory and motor information can be processed by separate neuronal populations, there is neuroanatomical evidence of direct sensory-motor feedback in the neural gut-brain axis throughout the entire caudal-rostral extent of the brain. This is the first study to exhaustively investigate the sensory-motor organization of the neural gut-brain axis, and is a step toward phenotyping the many central neuronal populations involved in GI control.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuroscience Program, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 405 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana 61801, IL, USA.Neuroscience Program, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 405 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana 61801, IL, USA; Department of Food Sciences and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana 61801, IL, USA.Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S Lincoln Avenue, Urbana 61802, IL, USA.Neuroscience Program, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 405 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana 61801, IL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32151980

Citation

Parker, Coltan G., et al. "Central Sensory-motor Crosstalk in the Neural Gut-brain Axis." Autonomic Neuroscience : Basic & Clinical, vol. 225, 2020, p. 102656.
Parker CG, Dailey MJ, Phillips H, et al. Central sensory-motor crosstalk in the neural gut-brain axis. Auton Neurosci. 2020;225:102656.
Parker, C. G., Dailey, M. J., Phillips, H., & Davis, E. A. (2020). Central sensory-motor crosstalk in the neural gut-brain axis. Autonomic Neuroscience : Basic & Clinical, 225, 102656. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.autneu.2020.102656
Parker CG, et al. Central Sensory-motor Crosstalk in the Neural Gut-brain Axis. Auton Neurosci. 2020 Feb 15;225:102656. PubMed PMID: 32151980.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Central sensory-motor crosstalk in the neural gut-brain axis. AU - Parker,Coltan G, AU - Dailey,Megan J, AU - Phillips,Heidi, AU - Davis,Elizabeth A, Y1 - 2020/02/15/ PY - 2019/09/05/received PY - 2020/01/27/revised PY - 2020/02/14/accepted PY - 2020/3/11/pubmed PY - 2020/3/11/medline PY - 2020/3/11/entrez KW - Autonomic nervous system KW - Neuroanatomy KW - Neuronal tract-tracers KW - Small intestine KW - Visceral afferents SP - 102656 EP - 102656 JF - Autonomic neuroscience : basic & clinical JO - Auton Neurosci VL - 225 N2 - The neural gut-brain axis consists of viscerosensory and autonomic motor neurons innervating the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Sensory neurons transmit nutrient-related and non-nutrient-related information to the brain, while motor neurons regulate GI motility and secretion. Previous research provides an incomplete picture of the brain nuclei that are directly connected with the neural gut-brain axis, and no studies have thoroughly assessed sensory-motor overlap in those nuclei. Our goal in this study was to comprehensively characterize the central sensory and motor circuitry associated with the neural gut-brain axis linked to a segment of the small intestine. We injected a retrograde (pseudorabies; PRV) and anterograde (herpes simplex virus 1; HSV) transsynaptic viral tracer into the duodenal wall of adult male rats. Immunohistochemical processing revealed single- and double-labeled cells that were quantified per nucleus. We found that across nearly all brain regions assessed, PRV + HSV immunoreactive neurons comprised the greatest percentage of labeled cells compared with single-labeled PRV or HSV neurons. These results indicate that even though sensory and motor information can be processed by separate neuronal populations, there is neuroanatomical evidence of direct sensory-motor feedback in the neural gut-brain axis throughout the entire caudal-rostral extent of the brain. This is the first study to exhaustively investigate the sensory-motor organization of the neural gut-brain axis, and is a step toward phenotyping the many central neuronal populations involved in GI control. SN - 1872-7484 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32151980/Central_sensory-motor_crosstalk_in_the_neural_gut-brain_axis L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1566-0702(19)30222-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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