Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Decision-making flexibility in New Caledonian crows, young children and adult humans in a multi-dimensional tool-use task.
PLoS One. 2020; 15(3):e0219874.Plos

Abstract

The ability to make profitable decisions in natural foraging contexts may be influenced by an additional requirement of tool-use, due to increased levels of relational complexity and additional work-effort imposed by tool-use, compared with simply choosing between an immediate and delayed food item. We examined the flexibility for making the most profitable decisions in a multi-dimensional tool-use task, involving different apparatuses, tools and rewards of varying quality, in 3-5-year-old children, adult humans and tool-making New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides). We also compared our results to previous studies on habitually tool-making orangutans (Pongo abelii) and non-tool-making Goffin's cockatoos (Cacatua goffiniana). Adult humans, cockatoos and crows, but not children and orangutans, did not select a tool when it was not necessary, which was the more profitable choice in this situation. Adult humans, orangutans and cockatoos, but not crows and children, were able to refrain from selecting non-functional tools. By contrast, the birds, but not the primates tested, struggled to attend to multiple variables-where two apparatuses, two tools and two reward qualities were presented simultaneously-without extended experience. These findings indicate: (1) in a similar manner to humans and orangutans, New Caledonian crows and Goffin's cockatoos can flexibly make profitable decisions in some decision-making tool-use tasks, though the birds may struggle when tasks become more complex; (2) children and orangutans may have a bias to use tools in situations where adults and other tool-making species do not.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, United Kingdom.School of Psychology, University of Auckland, Auckland Central, New Zealand.Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, United Kingdom.School of Psychology, University of Auckland, Auckland Central, New Zealand. Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, Jena, Germany.School of Psychological Science, University of Bristol, Bristol, England, United Kingdom.School of Psychology, University of Auckland, Auckland Central, New Zealand. Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, Jena, Germany.Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, United Kingdom.School of Psychology, University of Auckland, Auckland Central, New Zealand.Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England, United Kingdom.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32160191

Citation

Miller, Rachael, et al. "Decision-making Flexibility in New Caledonian Crows, Young Children and Adult Humans in a Multi-dimensional Tool-use Task." PloS One, vol. 15, no. 3, 2020, pp. e0219874.
Miller R, Gruber R, Frohnwieser A, et al. Decision-making flexibility in New Caledonian crows, young children and adult humans in a multi-dimensional tool-use task. PLoS ONE. 2020;15(3):e0219874.
Miller, R., Gruber, R., Frohnwieser, A., Schiestl, M., Jelbert, S. A., Gray, R. D., Boeckle, M., Taylor, A. H., & Clayton, N. S. (2020). Decision-making flexibility in New Caledonian crows, young children and adult humans in a multi-dimensional tool-use task. PloS One, 15(3), e0219874. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0219874
Miller R, et al. Decision-making Flexibility in New Caledonian Crows, Young Children and Adult Humans in a Multi-dimensional Tool-use Task. PLoS ONE. 2020;15(3):e0219874. PubMed PMID: 32160191.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Decision-making flexibility in New Caledonian crows, young children and adult humans in a multi-dimensional tool-use task. AU - Miller,Rachael, AU - Gruber,Romana, AU - Frohnwieser,Anna, AU - Schiestl,Martina, AU - Jelbert,Sarah A, AU - Gray,Russell D, AU - Boeckle,Markus, AU - Taylor,Alex H, AU - Clayton,Nicola S, Y1 - 2020/03/11/ PY - 2019/07/01/received PY - 2020/02/12/accepted PY - 2020/3/12/entrez PY - 2020/3/12/pubmed PY - 2020/5/19/medline SP - e0219874 EP - e0219874 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 15 IS - 3 N2 - The ability to make profitable decisions in natural foraging contexts may be influenced by an additional requirement of tool-use, due to increased levels of relational complexity and additional work-effort imposed by tool-use, compared with simply choosing between an immediate and delayed food item. We examined the flexibility for making the most profitable decisions in a multi-dimensional tool-use task, involving different apparatuses, tools and rewards of varying quality, in 3-5-year-old children, adult humans and tool-making New Caledonian crows (Corvus moneduloides). We also compared our results to previous studies on habitually tool-making orangutans (Pongo abelii) and non-tool-making Goffin's cockatoos (Cacatua goffiniana). Adult humans, cockatoos and crows, but not children and orangutans, did not select a tool when it was not necessary, which was the more profitable choice in this situation. Adult humans, orangutans and cockatoos, but not crows and children, were able to refrain from selecting non-functional tools. By contrast, the birds, but not the primates tested, struggled to attend to multiple variables-where two apparatuses, two tools and two reward qualities were presented simultaneously-without extended experience. These findings indicate: (1) in a similar manner to humans and orangutans, New Caledonian crows and Goffin's cockatoos can flexibly make profitable decisions in some decision-making tool-use tasks, though the birds may struggle when tasks become more complex; (2) children and orangutans may have a bias to use tools in situations where adults and other tool-making species do not. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32160191/Decision-making_flexibility_in_New_Caledonian_crows,_young_children_and_adult_humans_in_a_multi-dimensional_tool-use_task L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0219874 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -