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Iatrogenic ophthalmic artery occlusion and retinal artery occlusion.
Prog Retin Eye Res. 2020 Mar 10 [Online ahead of print]PR

Abstract

Iatrogenic ophthalmic artery occlusion (IOAO) is a rare but devastating ophthalmic disease that may cause sudden and permanent visual loss. Understanding the possible etiologic modalities and pathogenic mechanisms of IOAO may prevent its occurrence. There are numerous medical etiologies of IOAO, including cosmetic facial filler injection, intravascular procedures, intravitreal gas or drug injection, retrobulbar anesthesia, intraarterial chemotherapy in retinoblastoma. Non-ocular surgeries and vascular events in arteries that are not directly associated with the ophthalmic artery, can also cause IOAO. Since IOAO has a limited number of treatment modalities, which lead to poor final visual prognosis, it is imperative to acknowledge the information regarding medical procedures that are etiologically associated with IOAO. We accumulated all searchable and available IOAO case reports (our cases and previous reported cases from the literature), classified them according to their mechanisms of pathogenesis, and summarized treatment options and responses of each of the causes. Various sporadic cases of IOAO can be categorized into three mechanisms as follows: intravascular event, orbital compartment syndrome, and increased intraocular pressure. Embolic IOAO, which is considered the primary cause of the condition, was classified into three subgroups according to the pathway of embolic movement (retrograde pathway, anterograde pathway, pathway through collateral channels). Despite the practical limitations of treating spontaneous (non-iatrogenic) retinal artery occlusion, this article will contribute in predicting and improving the prognosis of IOAO by recognizing the treatable factors. Furthermore, it is expected to provide clues to future research associated with the treatment of retinal artery occlusion.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea.Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cerebrovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea.Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea.Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: sejoon1@snu.ac.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32165219

Citation

Lee, Jong Suk, et al. "Iatrogenic Ophthalmic Artery Occlusion and Retinal Artery Occlusion." Progress in Retinal and Eye Research, 2020, p. 100848.
Lee JS, Kim JY, Jung C, et al. Iatrogenic ophthalmic artery occlusion and retinal artery occlusion. Prog Retin Eye Res. 2020.
Lee, J. S., Kim, J. Y., Jung, C., & Woo, S. J. (2020). Iatrogenic ophthalmic artery occlusion and retinal artery occlusion. Progress in Retinal and Eye Research, 100848. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.preteyeres.2020.100848
Lee JS, et al. Iatrogenic Ophthalmic Artery Occlusion and Retinal Artery Occlusion. Prog Retin Eye Res. 2020 Mar 10;100848. PubMed PMID: 32165219.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iatrogenic ophthalmic artery occlusion and retinal artery occlusion. AU - Lee,Jong Suk, AU - Kim,Jun Yup, AU - Jung,Cheolkyu, AU - Woo,Se Joon, Y1 - 2020/03/10/ PY - 2019/11/27/received PY - 2020/03/03/revised PY - 2020/03/04/accepted PY - 2020/3/14/pubmed PY - 2020/3/14/medline PY - 2020/3/14/entrez KW - Compartment syndromes KW - Dermal fillers KW - Endovascular procedures KW - Iatrogenic disease KW - Intraocular pressure KW - Ophthalmic artery occlusion KW - Retinal artery occlusion SP - 100848 EP - 100848 JF - Progress in retinal and eye research JO - Prog Retin Eye Res N2 - Iatrogenic ophthalmic artery occlusion (IOAO) is a rare but devastating ophthalmic disease that may cause sudden and permanent visual loss. Understanding the possible etiologic modalities and pathogenic mechanisms of IOAO may prevent its occurrence. There are numerous medical etiologies of IOAO, including cosmetic facial filler injection, intravascular procedures, intravitreal gas or drug injection, retrobulbar anesthesia, intraarterial chemotherapy in retinoblastoma. Non-ocular surgeries and vascular events in arteries that are not directly associated with the ophthalmic artery, can also cause IOAO. Since IOAO has a limited number of treatment modalities, which lead to poor final visual prognosis, it is imperative to acknowledge the information regarding medical procedures that are etiologically associated with IOAO. We accumulated all searchable and available IOAO case reports (our cases and previous reported cases from the literature), classified them according to their mechanisms of pathogenesis, and summarized treatment options and responses of each of the causes. Various sporadic cases of IOAO can be categorized into three mechanisms as follows: intravascular event, orbital compartment syndrome, and increased intraocular pressure. Embolic IOAO, which is considered the primary cause of the condition, was classified into three subgroups according to the pathway of embolic movement (retrograde pathway, anterograde pathway, pathway through collateral channels). Despite the practical limitations of treating spontaneous (non-iatrogenic) retinal artery occlusion, this article will contribute in predicting and improving the prognosis of IOAO by recognizing the treatable factors. Furthermore, it is expected to provide clues to future research associated with the treatment of retinal artery occlusion. SN - 1873-1635 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32165219/Iatrogenic_ophthalmic_artery_occlusion_and_retinal_artery_occlusion L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1350-9462(20)30020-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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