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Epidemiology of COVID-19 Among Children in China.
Pediatrics. 2020 06; 145(6)Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify the epidemiological characteristics and transmission patterns of pediatric patients with the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China.

METHODS

Nationwide case series of 2135 pediatric patients with COVID-19 reported to the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention from January 16, 2020, to February 8, 2020, were included. The epidemic curves were constructed by key dates of disease onset and case diagnosis. Onset-to-diagnosis curves were constructed by fitting a log-normal distribution to data on both onset and diagnosis dates.

RESULTS

There were 728 (34.1%) laboratory-confirmed cases and 1407 (65.9%) suspected cases. The median age of all patients was 7 years (interquartile range: 2-13 years), and 1208 case patients (56.6%) were boys. More than 90% of all patients had asymptomatic, mild, or moderate cases. The median time from illness onset to diagnoses was 2 days (range: 0-42 days). There was a rapid increase of disease at the early stage of the epidemic, and then there was a gradual and steady decrease. The disease rapidly spread from Hubei province to surrounding provinces over time. More children were infected in Hubei province than any other province.

CONCLUSIONS

Children of all ages appeared susceptible to COVID-19, and there was no significant sex difference. Although clinical manifestations of children's COVID-19 cases were generally less severe than those of adult patients, young children, particularly infants, were vulnerable to infection. The distribution of children's COVID-19 cases varied with time and space, and most of the cases were concentrated in Hubei province and surrounding areas. Furthermore, this study provides strong evidence of human-to-human transmission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Child Health Advocacy Institute, China Hospital Development Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. Contributed equally as co-first authors.Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Contributed equally as co-first authors.Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Schools of Public Health and Medicine, Xian Jiaotong University, Xian, China.Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Child Health Advocacy Institute, China Hospital Development Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China.Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; tongshilu@scmc.com.cn. Institute of Environment and Population Health, School of Public Health, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China; and. School of Public Health, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32179660

Citation

Dong, Yuanyuan, et al. "Epidemiology of COVID-19 Among Children in China." Pediatrics, vol. 145, no. 6, 2020.
Dong Y, Mo X, Hu Y, et al. Epidemiology of COVID-19 Among Children in China. Pediatrics. 2020;145(6).
Dong, Y., Mo, X., Hu, Y., Qi, X., Jiang, F., Jiang, Z., & Tong, S. (2020). Epidemiology of COVID-19 Among Children in China. Pediatrics, 145(6). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2020-0702
Dong Y, et al. Epidemiology of COVID-19 Among Children in China. Pediatrics. 2020;145(6) PubMed PMID: 32179660.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of COVID-19 Among Children in China. AU - Dong,Yuanyuan, AU - Mo,Xi, AU - Hu,Yabin, AU - Qi,Xin, AU - Jiang,Fan, AU - Jiang,Zhongyi, AU - Tong,Shilu, Y1 - 2020/03/16/ PY - 2020/03/13/accepted PY - 2020/3/18/pubmed PY - 2020/3/18/medline PY - 2020/3/18/entrez JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 145 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify the epidemiological characteristics and transmission patterns of pediatric patients with the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China. METHODS: Nationwide case series of 2135 pediatric patients with COVID-19 reported to the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention from January 16, 2020, to February 8, 2020, were included. The epidemic curves were constructed by key dates of disease onset and case diagnosis. Onset-to-diagnosis curves were constructed by fitting a log-normal distribution to data on both onset and diagnosis dates. RESULTS: There were 728 (34.1%) laboratory-confirmed cases and 1407 (65.9%) suspected cases. The median age of all patients was 7 years (interquartile range: 2-13 years), and 1208 case patients (56.6%) were boys. More than 90% of all patients had asymptomatic, mild, or moderate cases. The median time from illness onset to diagnoses was 2 days (range: 0-42 days). There was a rapid increase of disease at the early stage of the epidemic, and then there was a gradual and steady decrease. The disease rapidly spread from Hubei province to surrounding provinces over time. More children were infected in Hubei province than any other province. CONCLUSIONS: Children of all ages appeared susceptible to COVID-19, and there was no significant sex difference. Although clinical manifestations of children's COVID-19 cases were generally less severe than those of adult patients, young children, particularly infants, were vulnerable to infection. The distribution of children's COVID-19 cases varied with time and space, and most of the cases were concentrated in Hubei province and surrounding areas. Furthermore, this study provides strong evidence of human-to-human transmission. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32179660/full_citation L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=32179660 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -