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Effects of dairy products, calcium and vitamin D on ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis of twenty-nine epidemiological studies.
Br J Nutr. 2020 11 28; 124(10):1001-1012.BJ

Abstract

Findings for the roles of dairy products, Ca and vitamin D on ovarian cancer risk remain controversial. We aimed to assess these associations by using an updated meta-analysis. Five electronic databases (e.g. PubMed and Embase) were searched from inception to 24 December 2019. Pooled relative risks (RR) with 95 % CI were calculated. A total of twenty-nine case-control or cohort studies were included. For comparisons of the highest v. lowest intakes, higher whole milk intake was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk (RR 1·35; 95 % CI 1·15, 1·59), whereas decreased risks were observed for higher intakes of low-fat milk (RR 0·84; 95 % CI 0·73, 0·96), dietary Ca (RR 0·71; 95 % CI 0·60, 0·84) and dietary vitamin D (RR 0·80; 95 % CI 0·67, 0·95). Additionally, for every 100 g/d increment, increased ovarian cancer risks were found for total dairy products (RR 1·03; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·04) and for whole milk (RR 1·07; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·11); however, decreased risks were found for 100 g/d increased intakes of low-fat milk (RR 0·95; 95 % CI 0·91, 0·99), cheese (RR 0·87; 95 % CI 0·76, 0·98), dietary Ca (RR 0·96; 95 % CI 0·95, 0·98), total Ca (RR 0·98; 95 % CI 0·97, 0·99), dietary vitamin D (RR 0·92; 95 % CI 0·87, 0·97) and increased levels of circulating vitamin D (RR 0·84; 95 % CI 0·72, 0·97). These results show that whole milk intake might contribute to a higher ovarian cancer risk, whereas low-fat milk, dietary Ca and dietary vitamin D might reduce the risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People's Republic of China. Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Peking University Sixth Hospital (Institute of Mental Health), National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorders & Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University), No. 51 Huayuan Bei Road, Beijing100191, People's Republic of China.Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shangrao Fifth People's Hospital, Shangrao334000, Jiangxi, People's Republic of China.Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.International School, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.International School, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Medical Statistics & Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Hainan Medical University, Haikou571199, People's Republic of China.The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, No. 1 East Jianshe Road, Zhengzhou450052, Henan, People's Republic of China.Department of Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Guangzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 1 Qi De Road, Guangzhou510440, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, No. 601 Huangpu Road West, Guangzhou510632, Guangdong, People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32189606

Citation

Liao, Min-Qi, et al. "Effects of Dairy Products, Calcium and Vitamin D On Ovarian Cancer Risk: a Meta-analysis of Twenty-nine Epidemiological Studies." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 124, no. 10, 2020, pp. 1001-1012.
Liao MQ, Gao XP, Yu XX, et al. Effects of dairy products, calcium and vitamin D on ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis of twenty-nine epidemiological studies. Br J Nutr. 2020;124(10):1001-1012.
Liao, M. Q., Gao, X. P., Yu, X. X., Zeng, Y. F., Li, S. N., Naicker, N., Joseph, T., Cao, W. T., Liu, Y. H., Zhu, S., Chen, Q. S., Yang, Z. C., & Zeng, F. F. (2020). Effects of dairy products, calcium and vitamin D on ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis of twenty-nine epidemiological studies. The British Journal of Nutrition, 124(10), 1001-1012. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114520001075
Liao MQ, et al. Effects of Dairy Products, Calcium and Vitamin D On Ovarian Cancer Risk: a Meta-analysis of Twenty-nine Epidemiological Studies. Br J Nutr. 2020 11 28;124(10):1001-1012. PubMed PMID: 32189606.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of dairy products, calcium and vitamin D on ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis of twenty-nine epidemiological studies. AU - Liao,Min-Qi, AU - Gao,Xu-Ping, AU - Yu,Xiao-Xuan, AU - Zeng,Yu-Fei, AU - Li,Shu-Na, AU - Naicker,Nalen, AU - Joseph,Tanya, AU - Cao,Wen-Ting, AU - Liu,Yan-Hua, AU - Zhu,Sui, AU - Chen,Qing-Shan, AU - Yang,Zhi-Cong, AU - Zeng,Fang-Fang, Y1 - 2020/03/19/ PY - 2020/3/20/pubmed PY - 2021/3/5/medline PY - 2020/3/20/entrez KW - Calcium KW - Dairy products KW - Meta-analyses KW - Ovarian cancer KW - Vitamin D SP - 1001 EP - 1012 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 124 IS - 10 N2 - Findings for the roles of dairy products, Ca and vitamin D on ovarian cancer risk remain controversial. We aimed to assess these associations by using an updated meta-analysis. Five electronic databases (e.g. PubMed and Embase) were searched from inception to 24 December 2019. Pooled relative risks (RR) with 95 % CI were calculated. A total of twenty-nine case-control or cohort studies were included. For comparisons of the highest v. lowest intakes, higher whole milk intake was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk (RR 1·35; 95 % CI 1·15, 1·59), whereas decreased risks were observed for higher intakes of low-fat milk (RR 0·84; 95 % CI 0·73, 0·96), dietary Ca (RR 0·71; 95 % CI 0·60, 0·84) and dietary vitamin D (RR 0·80; 95 % CI 0·67, 0·95). Additionally, for every 100 g/d increment, increased ovarian cancer risks were found for total dairy products (RR 1·03; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·04) and for whole milk (RR 1·07; 95 % CI 1·03, 1·11); however, decreased risks were found for 100 g/d increased intakes of low-fat milk (RR 0·95; 95 % CI 0·91, 0·99), cheese (RR 0·87; 95 % CI 0·76, 0·98), dietary Ca (RR 0·96; 95 % CI 0·95, 0·98), total Ca (RR 0·98; 95 % CI 0·97, 0·99), dietary vitamin D (RR 0·92; 95 % CI 0·87, 0·97) and increased levels of circulating vitamin D (RR 0·84; 95 % CI 0·72, 0·97). These results show that whole milk intake might contribute to a higher ovarian cancer risk, whereas low-fat milk, dietary Ca and dietary vitamin D might reduce the risk. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32189606/Effects_of_dairy_products_calcium_and_vitamin_D_on_ovarian_cancer_risk:_a_meta_analysis_of_twenty_nine_epidemiological_studies_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114520001075/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -