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Zinc toxicity in seedlings of three trees from the Fabaceae associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.
Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2020 Jun 01; 195:110450.EE

Abstract

Due to diverse human activities zinc (Zn) may reach phytotoxic levels in the soil. Here, we evaluated the differential sensibility of three Brazilian tree species from the Fabaceae to increasing soil Zn concentrations and its physiological response to cope with excess Zn. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with the species: Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia, Erythrina speciosa and Schizolobium parahyba, and the addition of 0, 200, 400 and 600 mg Zn kg-1 to the soil. Plants were harvested after three months of cultivation, and growth, root symbiosis, biochemical markers and elemental composition were analyzed. Soil Zn addition reduced seedling growth, irrespective of the species, with a strong reduction in M. caesalpiniaefolia. Regarding root symbiosis, in N2-fixing species, nitrogenase activity was reduced by the highest Zn concentrations. Zn addition caused plants nutritional imbalances, mainly in roots. The content of photosynthetic pigments in leaves decreased up to 40%, suggesting that high Zn contents interfered with its biosynthesis, and altered the content of foliar polyamines and free amino acids, depending on the species and the soil Zn concentration. Zn toxicity in M. caesalpiniaefolia plants was observed at available soil Zn concentrations greater than 100 mg kg-1 (DTPA-extractable), being the most sensitive species and E. speciosa was moderately sensitive. S. parahyba was a moderately tolerant species, which seems to be related to polyamines accumulation and to mycorrhizal association. This last species has the potential for revegetation of areas with moderately high soil Zn concentration and for phytostabilization purposes. Future research evaluating the tolerance to multiple metal stress under field conditions should confirm S. parayba suitability in Zn contaminated areas of tropical regions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Plant Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, PO Box 6109, 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil; Department of Botany, Federal University of São Carlos, PO Box 676, 13565-905, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: sarahsouza@ufscar.br.Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia Goiano, Campus Rio Verde , Polo de Inovação em Bioenergia e Grãos, Rio Verde, GO, Brazil.Department of Plant Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, PO Box 6109, 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.Department of Plant Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, PO Box 6109, 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.Department of Plant Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, PO Box 6109, 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: sardrian@unicamp.br.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32197181

Citation

Souza, Sarah C R., et al. "Zinc Toxicity in Seedlings of Three Trees From the Fabaceae Associated With Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi." Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, vol. 195, 2020, p. 110450.
Souza SCR, Souza LA, Schiavinato MA, et al. Zinc toxicity in seedlings of three trees from the Fabaceae associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2020;195:110450.
Souza, S. C. R., Souza, L. A., Schiavinato, M. A., de Oliveira Silva, F. M., & de Andrade, S. A. L. (2020). Zinc toxicity in seedlings of three trees from the Fabaceae associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 195, 110450. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2020.110450
Souza SCR, et al. Zinc Toxicity in Seedlings of Three Trees From the Fabaceae Associated With Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2020 Jun 1;195:110450. PubMed PMID: 32197181.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Zinc toxicity in seedlings of three trees from the Fabaceae associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. AU - Souza,Sarah C R, AU - Souza,Lucas A, AU - Schiavinato,Marlene A, AU - de Oliveira Silva,Franklin M, AU - de Andrade,Sara A L, Y1 - 2020/04/01/ PY - 2020/01/23/received PY - 2020/03/03/revised PY - 2020/03/06/accepted PY - 2020/3/21/pubmed PY - 2020/6/25/medline PY - 2020/3/21/entrez KW - Mycorrhizae KW - N(2)-fixation KW - Nitrogenase activity KW - Nutrient imbalances KW - Phytoremediation SP - 110450 EP - 110450 JF - Ecotoxicology and environmental safety JO - Ecotoxicol Environ Saf VL - 195 N2 - Due to diverse human activities zinc (Zn) may reach phytotoxic levels in the soil. Here, we evaluated the differential sensibility of three Brazilian tree species from the Fabaceae to increasing soil Zn concentrations and its physiological response to cope with excess Zn. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with the species: Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia, Erythrina speciosa and Schizolobium parahyba, and the addition of 0, 200, 400 and 600 mg Zn kg-1 to the soil. Plants were harvested after three months of cultivation, and growth, root symbiosis, biochemical markers and elemental composition were analyzed. Soil Zn addition reduced seedling growth, irrespective of the species, with a strong reduction in M. caesalpiniaefolia. Regarding root symbiosis, in N2-fixing species, nitrogenase activity was reduced by the highest Zn concentrations. Zn addition caused plants nutritional imbalances, mainly in roots. The content of photosynthetic pigments in leaves decreased up to 40%, suggesting that high Zn contents interfered with its biosynthesis, and altered the content of foliar polyamines and free amino acids, depending on the species and the soil Zn concentration. Zn toxicity in M. caesalpiniaefolia plants was observed at available soil Zn concentrations greater than 100 mg kg-1 (DTPA-extractable), being the most sensitive species and E. speciosa was moderately sensitive. S. parahyba was a moderately tolerant species, which seems to be related to polyamines accumulation and to mycorrhizal association. This last species has the potential for revegetation of areas with moderately high soil Zn concentration and for phytostabilization purposes. Future research evaluating the tolerance to multiple metal stress under field conditions should confirm S. parayba suitability in Zn contaminated areas of tropical regions. SN - 1090-2414 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32197181/Zinc_toxicity_in_seedlings_of_three_trees_from_the_Fabaceae_associated_with_arbuscular_mycorrhizal_fungi_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0147-6513(20)30289-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -