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Identifying SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses in Malayan pangolins.
Nature. 2020 07; 583(7815):282-285.Nat

Abstract

The ongoing outbreak of viral pneumonia in China and across the world is associated with a new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-21. This outbreak has been tentatively associated with a seafood market in Wuhan, China, where the sale of wild animals may be the source of zoonotic infection2. Although bats are probable reservoir hosts for SARS-CoV-2, the identity of any intermediate host that may have facilitated transfer to humans is unknown. Here we report the identification of SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses in Malayan pangolins (Manis javanica) seized in anti-smuggling operations in southern China. Metagenomic sequencing identified pangolin-associated coronaviruses that belong to two sub-lineages of SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses, including one that exhibits strong similarity in the receptor-binding domain to SARS-CoV-2. The discovery of multiple lineages of pangolin coronavirus and their similarity to SARS-CoV-2 suggests that pangolins should be considered as possible hosts in the emergence of new coronaviruses and should be removed from wet markets to prevent zoonotic transmission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Joint Institute of Virology (Shantou University and The University of Hong Kong), Guangdong-Hongkong Joint Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Shantou University, Shantou, P. R. China. State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China.Joint Institute of Virology (Shantou University and The University of Hong Kong), Guangdong-Hongkong Joint Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Shantou University, Shantou, P. R. China. State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, P. R. China.Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Soft Matter Science and Engineering (BAIC-SM), College of Life Science and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, P. R. China.Guangzhou Customs Technology Center, Guangzhou, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, P. R. China.Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Soft Matter Science and Engineering (BAIC-SM), College of Life Science and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China.Life Sciences Institute, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China.Guangzhou Customs Technology Center, Guangzhou, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, P. R. China.School of Information and Management, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, P. R. China.Guangzhou Customs Technology Center, Guangzhou, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China.Guangzhou Customs Technology Center, Guangzhou, P. R. China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, P. R. China.Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, School of Life and Environmental Sciences and School of Medical Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Life Sciences Institute, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, P. R. China. huyanling@gxmu.edu.cn. Center for Genomic and Personalized Medicine, Guangxi Medical University, Nanning, P. R. China. huyanling@gxmu.edu.cn.Joint Institute of Virology (Shantou University and The University of Hong Kong), Guangdong-Hongkong Joint Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Shantou University, Shantou, P. R. China. yguan@hku.hk. State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, P. R. China. yguan@hku.hk.State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology, Beijing, P. R. China. caowc@bmi.ac.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32218527

Citation

Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk, et al. "Identifying SARS-CoV-2-related Coronaviruses in Malayan Pangolins." Nature, vol. 583, no. 7815, 2020, pp. 282-285.
Lam TT, Jia N, Zhang YW, et al. Identifying SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses in Malayan pangolins. Nature. 2020;583(7815):282-285.
Lam, T. T., Jia, N., Zhang, Y. W., Shum, M. H., Jiang, J. F., Zhu, H. C., Tong, Y. G., Shi, Y. X., Ni, X. B., Liao, Y. S., Li, W. J., Jiang, B. G., Wei, W., Yuan, T. T., Zheng, K., Cui, X. M., Li, J., Pei, G. Q., Qiang, X., ... Cao, W. C. (2020). Identifying SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses in Malayan pangolins. Nature, 583(7815), 282-285. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2169-0
Lam TT, et al. Identifying SARS-CoV-2-related Coronaviruses in Malayan Pangolins. Nature. 2020;583(7815):282-285. PubMed PMID: 32218527.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Identifying SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses in Malayan pangolins. AU - Lam,Tommy Tsan-Yuk, AU - Jia,Na, AU - Zhang,Ya-Wei, AU - Shum,Marcus Ho-Hin, AU - Jiang,Jia-Fu, AU - Zhu,Hua-Chen, AU - Tong,Yi-Gang, AU - Shi,Yong-Xia, AU - Ni,Xue-Bing, AU - Liao,Yun-Shi, AU - Li,Wen-Juan, AU - Jiang,Bao-Gui, AU - Wei,Wei, AU - Yuan,Ting-Ting, AU - Zheng,Kui, AU - Cui,Xiao-Ming, AU - Li,Jie, AU - Pei,Guang-Qian, AU - Qiang,Xin, AU - Cheung,William Yiu-Man, AU - Li,Lian-Feng, AU - Sun,Fang-Fang, AU - Qin,Si, AU - Huang,Ji-Cheng, AU - Leung,Gabriel M, AU - Holmes,Edward C, AU - Hu,Yan-Ling, AU - Guan,Yi, AU - Cao,Wu-Chun, Y1 - 2020/03/26/ PY - 2020/02/07/received PY - 2020/03/17/accepted PY - 2020/3/29/pubmed PY - 2020/7/14/medline PY - 2020/3/29/entrez SP - 282 EP - 285 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 583 IS - 7815 N2 - The ongoing outbreak of viral pneumonia in China and across the world is associated with a new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-21. This outbreak has been tentatively associated with a seafood market in Wuhan, China, where the sale of wild animals may be the source of zoonotic infection2. Although bats are probable reservoir hosts for SARS-CoV-2, the identity of any intermediate host that may have facilitated transfer to humans is unknown. Here we report the identification of SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses in Malayan pangolins (Manis javanica) seized in anti-smuggling operations in southern China. Metagenomic sequencing identified pangolin-associated coronaviruses that belong to two sub-lineages of SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses, including one that exhibits strong similarity in the receptor-binding domain to SARS-CoV-2. The discovery of multiple lineages of pangolin coronavirus and their similarity to SARS-CoV-2 suggests that pangolins should be considered as possible hosts in the emergence of new coronaviruses and should be removed from wet markets to prevent zoonotic transmission. SN - 1476-4687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32218527/Identifying_SARS_CoV_2_related_coronaviruses_in_Malayan_pangolins_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2169-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -