Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The impact of level of neonatal care provision on outcomes for preterm babies born between 27 and 31 weeks of gestation, or with a birth weight between 1000 and 1500 g: a review of the literature.
BMJ Paediatr Open. 2020; 4(1):e000583.BP

Abstract

Objective

There is evidence that birth and care in a maternity service associated with a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is associated with improved survival in preterm babies born at <27 weeks of gestation. We conducted a systematic review to address whether similar gains manifested in babies born between 27+0 and 31+6 weeks (hereafter 27 and 31 weeks) of gestation, or in those with a birth weight between 1000 and 1500 g.

Methods

We searched Embase, Medline and CINAHL databases for studies comparing outcomes for babies born between 27 and 31 weeks or between 1000 and 1500 g birth weight, based on designation of the neonatal unit where the baby was born or subsequently cared for (NICU vs non-NICU setting). A modified QUIPS (QUality In Prognostic Studies) tool was used to assess quality.

Results

Nine studies compared outcomes for babies born between 27 and 31 weeks of gestation and 11 studies compared outcomes for babies born between 1000 and 1500 g birth weight. Heterogeneity in comparator groups, birth locations, gestational age ranges, timescale for mortality reporting, and description of morbidities facilitated a narrative review as opposed to a meta-analysis.

Conclusion

Due to paucity of evidence, significant heterogeneity and potential for bias, we were not able to answer our question-does place of birth or care affect outcomes for babies born between 27 and 31 weeks? This supports the need for large-scale research to investigate place of birth and care for babies born in this gestational age range.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Sciences, College of Life Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK. Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust, Wolverhampton, UK.Department of Health Sciences, College of Life Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust, Wolverhampton, UK. School of Medicine and Clinical Practice, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton, UK.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32232179

Citation

Ismail, Abdul Qader Tahir, et al. "The Impact of Level of Neonatal Care Provision On Outcomes for Preterm Babies Born Between 27 and 31 Weeks of Gestation, or With a Birth Weight Between 1000 and 1500 G: a Review of the Literature." BMJ Paediatrics Open, vol. 4, no. 1, 2020, pp. e000583.
Ismail AQT, Boyle EM, Pillay T, et al. The impact of level of neonatal care provision on outcomes for preterm babies born between 27 and 31 weeks of gestation, or with a birth weight between 1000 and 1500 g: a review of the literature. BMJ Paediatr Open. 2020;4(1):e000583.
Ismail, A. Q. T., Boyle, E. M., & Pillay, T. (2020). The impact of level of neonatal care provision on outcomes for preterm babies born between 27 and 31 weeks of gestation, or with a birth weight between 1000 and 1500 g: a review of the literature. BMJ Paediatrics Open, 4(1), e000583. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjpo-2019-000583
Ismail AQT, et al. The Impact of Level of Neonatal Care Provision On Outcomes for Preterm Babies Born Between 27 and 31 Weeks of Gestation, or With a Birth Weight Between 1000 and 1500 G: a Review of the Literature. BMJ Paediatr Open. 2020;4(1):e000583. PubMed PMID: 32232179.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of level of neonatal care provision on outcomes for preterm babies born between 27 and 31 weeks of gestation, or with a birth weight between 1000 and 1500 g: a review of the literature. AU - Ismail,Abdul Qader Tahir, AU - Boyle,Elaine M, AU - Pillay,Thillagavathie, AU - ,, Y1 - 2020/03/17/ PY - 2019/09/18/received PY - 2020/01/14/revised PY - 2020/01/31/accepted PY - 2020/4/2/entrez PY - 2020/4/2/pubmed PY - 2020/4/2/medline KW - evidence based medicine KW - health service KW - neonatology SP - e000583 EP - e000583 JF - BMJ paediatrics open JO - BMJ Paediatr Open VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - Objective: There is evidence that birth and care in a maternity service associated with a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is associated with improved survival in preterm babies born at <27 weeks of gestation. We conducted a systematic review to address whether similar gains manifested in babies born between 27+0 and 31+6 weeks (hereafter 27 and 31 weeks) of gestation, or in those with a birth weight between 1000 and 1500 g. Methods: We searched Embase, Medline and CINAHL databases for studies comparing outcomes for babies born between 27 and 31 weeks or between 1000 and 1500 g birth weight, based on designation of the neonatal unit where the baby was born or subsequently cared for (NICU vs non-NICU setting). A modified QUIPS (QUality In Prognostic Studies) tool was used to assess quality. Results: Nine studies compared outcomes for babies born between 27 and 31 weeks of gestation and 11 studies compared outcomes for babies born between 1000 and 1500 g birth weight. Heterogeneity in comparator groups, birth locations, gestational age ranges, timescale for mortality reporting, and description of morbidities facilitated a narrative review as opposed to a meta-analysis. Conclusion: Due to paucity of evidence, significant heterogeneity and potential for bias, we were not able to answer our question-does place of birth or care affect outcomes for babies born between 27 and 31 weeks? This supports the need for large-scale research to investigate place of birth and care for babies born in this gestational age range. SN - 2399-9772 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32232179/The_impact_of_level_of_neonatal_care_provision_on_outcomes_for_preterm_babies_born_between_27_and_31_weeks_of_gestation_or_with_a_birth_weight_between_1000_and_1500_g:_a_review_of_the_literature_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjpo-2019-000583 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.