Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Weight development between age 5 and 10 years and its associations with dietary patterns at age 5 in the ABCD cohort.
BMC Public Health. 2020 Apr 01; 20(1):427.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Social inequalities in bodyweight start early in life and track into adulthood. Dietary patterns are an important determinant of weight development in children, towards both overweight and underweight. Therefore, we aimed to examine weight development between age 5 and 10 years by ethnicity, SES and thereafter by BMI category at age 5, to explore its association with dietary patterns at age 5.

METHODS

Participants were 1765 children from the Amsterdam Born Children and their Development (ABCD) cohort that had valid data on BMI at age 5 and 10 and diet at age 5. Linear mixed model analysis was used to examine weight development between age 5 and 10 years and to assess if four previously identified dietary patterns at age 5 (snacking, full-fat, meat and healthy) were associated with weight development. Analyses were adjusted for relevant confounders, stratified by ethnicity and SES and thereafter stratified per BMI category at age 5.

RESULTS

Overall, weight decreased in Dutch and high SES children and increased in non-Dutch and low/middle SES children. Across the range of bodyweight categories at age 5, we observed a conversion to normal weight, which was stronger in Dutch and high SES children but less pronounced in non-Dutch and low/middle SES children. Overall, the observed associations between weight development and dietary patterns were mixed with some unexpected findings: a healthy dietary pattern was positively associated with weight development in most groups, regardless of ethnicity and SES (e.g. Dutch B 0.084, 95% CI 0.038;0.130 and high SES B 0.096, 95% CI 0.047;0.143) whereas the full-fat pattern was negatively associated with weight development (e.g. Dutch B -0.069, 95% CI -0.114;-0.024 and high SES B -0.072, 95% CI -0.119;-0.026).

CONCLUSIONS

We observed differential weight development per ethnic and SES group. Our results indicate that each ethnic and SES group follows its own path of weight development. Associations between dietary patterns and weight development showed some unexpected findings; follow-up research is needed to understand the association between dietary patterns and weight development.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Sports and Nutrition, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Dr. Meurerlaan 8, Amsterdam, SM, 1067, The Netherlands. v.rashid@hva.nl.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Sports and Nutrition, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Dr. Meurerlaan 8, Amsterdam, SM, 1067, The Netherlands.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Sports and Nutrition, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Dr. Meurerlaan 8, Amsterdam, SM, 1067, The Netherlands.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Sports and Nutrition, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Dr. Meurerlaan 8, Amsterdam, SM, 1067, The Netherlands. Department Nutrition & Dietetics, Internal Medicine, Amsterdam University Medical Centers, location VUmc ZH4A12. De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, HV, 1081, The Netherlands.Department of Public Health, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Meibergdreef 9, Amsterdam, AZ, 1105, The Netherlands.Department of Sociology, University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 166, Amsterdam, WV, 1018, The Netherlands. Department of Epidemiology, Health Promotion and Health Care Innovation, Public Health Service Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 100, Amsterdam, WT, 1018, The Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32238152

Citation

Rashid, Viyan, et al. "Weight Development Between Age 5 and 10 Years and Its Associations With Dietary Patterns at Age 5 in the ABCD Cohort." BMC Public Health, vol. 20, no. 1, 2020, p. 427.
Rashid V, Streppel MT, Engberink MF, et al. Weight development between age 5 and 10 years and its associations with dietary patterns at age 5 in the ABCD cohort. BMC Public Health. 2020;20(1):427.
Rashid, V., Streppel, M. T., Engberink, M. F., Weijs, P. J. M., Nicolaou, M., & Verhoeff, A. P. (2020). Weight development between age 5 and 10 years and its associations with dietary patterns at age 5 in the ABCD cohort. BMC Public Health, 20(1), 427. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-08559-y
Rashid V, et al. Weight Development Between Age 5 and 10 Years and Its Associations With Dietary Patterns at Age 5 in the ABCD Cohort. BMC Public Health. 2020 Apr 1;20(1):427. PubMed PMID: 32238152.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Weight development between age 5 and 10 years and its associations with dietary patterns at age 5 in the ABCD cohort. AU - Rashid,Viyan, AU - Streppel,Martinette T, AU - Engberink,Marielle F, AU - Weijs,Peter J M, AU - Nicolaou,Mary, AU - Verhoeff,Arnoud P, Y1 - 2020/04/01/ PY - 2019/08/25/received PY - 2020/03/19/accepted PY - 2020/4/3/entrez PY - 2020/4/3/pubmed PY - 2020/8/26/medline KW - BMI KW - Body mass index KW - Children KW - Ethnicity KW - Normal weight KW - Obesity KW - Overweight KW - Socio-economic position KW - Thinness KW - Young children SP - 427 EP - 427 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Social inequalities in bodyweight start early in life and track into adulthood. Dietary patterns are an important determinant of weight development in children, towards both overweight and underweight. Therefore, we aimed to examine weight development between age 5 and 10 years by ethnicity, SES and thereafter by BMI category at age 5, to explore its association with dietary patterns at age 5. METHODS: Participants were 1765 children from the Amsterdam Born Children and their Development (ABCD) cohort that had valid data on BMI at age 5 and 10 and diet at age 5. Linear mixed model analysis was used to examine weight development between age 5 and 10 years and to assess if four previously identified dietary patterns at age 5 (snacking, full-fat, meat and healthy) were associated with weight development. Analyses were adjusted for relevant confounders, stratified by ethnicity and SES and thereafter stratified per BMI category at age 5. RESULTS: Overall, weight decreased in Dutch and high SES children and increased in non-Dutch and low/middle SES children. Across the range of bodyweight categories at age 5, we observed a conversion to normal weight, which was stronger in Dutch and high SES children but less pronounced in non-Dutch and low/middle SES children. Overall, the observed associations between weight development and dietary patterns were mixed with some unexpected findings: a healthy dietary pattern was positively associated with weight development in most groups, regardless of ethnicity and SES (e.g. Dutch B 0.084, 95% CI 0.038;0.130 and high SES B 0.096, 95% CI 0.047;0.143) whereas the full-fat pattern was negatively associated with weight development (e.g. Dutch B -0.069, 95% CI -0.114;-0.024 and high SES B -0.072, 95% CI -0.119;-0.026). CONCLUSIONS: We observed differential weight development per ethnic and SES group. Our results indicate that each ethnic and SES group follows its own path of weight development. Associations between dietary patterns and weight development showed some unexpected findings; follow-up research is needed to understand the association between dietary patterns and weight development. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32238152/Weight_development_between_age_5_and_10_years_and_its_associations_with_dietary_patterns_at_age_5_in_the_ABCD_cohort_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-020-08559-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -