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Leonardo da Vinci - ingenious anatomist: 500 years since the death of the famous erudite.
Rom J Morphol Embryol. 2019; 60(4):1391-1395.RJ

Abstract

Born on April 15, 1452, in a modest family in a hamlet from Tuscany, Leonardo da Vinci became the unassailable icon of Renaissance. Pushed throughout his entire life by his relentless curiosity, he was a painter, draughtsman, sculptor, poet, musician, writer, engineer, stage designer, architect, physicist, astronomer, cartographer and anatomist. His earliest surviving anatomical drawings (ca. 1485-1493) include studies of the skull, meninges, brain and cerebral ventricles. He was the first to pith a frog, concluding that piercing the spinal medulla will result in immediate death - a completely unexpected result in that era. In an effort to better understand the origins of the sensory and motor functions of the brain - which at the time was believed to be in the ventricles - he developed a method of injecting hot wax into the ventricles of an ox. He was the first to correctly describe the four ventricles of the brain. Thus, he circumvented a 16 century-long flaw in the dissection technique, which did not allow the correct study of the shape of the ventricles - decapitation and drainage of fluids before study. Even though he was never formally educated in the study of medicine, his work continues to inspire us today, 500 years after his death.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Oradea; Department of Neurosurgery, Bihor Emergency County Hospital, Oradea, Romania; mohanaurel@yahoo.com.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32239124

Citation

Săceleanu, Mircea Vicenţiu, et al. "Leonardo Da Vinci - Ingenious Anatomist: 500 Years Since the Death of the Famous Erudite." Romanian Journal of Morphology and Embryology = Revue Roumaine De Morphologie Et Embryologie, vol. 60, no. 4, 2019, pp. 1391-1395.
Săceleanu MV, Mohan AG, Marinescu AA, et al. Leonardo da Vinci - ingenious anatomist: 500 years since the death of the famous erudite. Rom J Morphol Embryol. 2019;60(4):1391-1395.
Săceleanu, M. V., Mohan, A. G., Marinescu, A. A., Marinescu, A., & Ciurea, A. V. (2019). Leonardo da Vinci - ingenious anatomist: 500 years since the death of the famous erudite. Romanian Journal of Morphology and Embryology = Revue Roumaine De Morphologie Et Embryologie, 60(4), 1391-1395.
Săceleanu MV, et al. Leonardo Da Vinci - Ingenious Anatomist: 500 Years Since the Death of the Famous Erudite. Rom J Morphol Embryol. 2019;60(4):1391-1395. PubMed PMID: 32239124.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Leonardo da Vinci - ingenious anatomist: 500 years since the death of the famous erudite. AU - Săceleanu,Mircea Vicenţiu, AU - Mohan,Aurel George, AU - Marinescu,Andrei Alexandru, AU - Marinescu,Alina, AU - Ciurea,Alexandru Vlad, PY - 2020/4/3/entrez PY - 2019/1/1/pubmed PY - 2020/7/22/medline SP - 1391 EP - 1395 JF - Romanian journal of morphology and embryology = Revue roumaine de morphologie et embryologie JO - Rom J Morphol Embryol VL - 60 IS - 4 N2 - Born on April 15, 1452, in a modest family in a hamlet from Tuscany, Leonardo da Vinci became the unassailable icon of Renaissance. Pushed throughout his entire life by his relentless curiosity, he was a painter, draughtsman, sculptor, poet, musician, writer, engineer, stage designer, architect, physicist, astronomer, cartographer and anatomist. His earliest surviving anatomical drawings (ca. 1485-1493) include studies of the skull, meninges, brain and cerebral ventricles. He was the first to pith a frog, concluding that piercing the spinal medulla will result in immediate death - a completely unexpected result in that era. In an effort to better understand the origins of the sensory and motor functions of the brain - which at the time was believed to be in the ventricles - he developed a method of injecting hot wax into the ventricles of an ox. He was the first to correctly describe the four ventricles of the brain. Thus, he circumvented a 16 century-long flaw in the dissection technique, which did not allow the correct study of the shape of the ventricles - decapitation and drainage of fluids before study. Even though he was never formally educated in the study of medicine, his work continues to inspire us today, 500 years after his death. SN - 2066-8279 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32239124/Leonardo_da_Vinci___ingenious_anatomist:_500_years_since_the_death_of_the_famous_erudite_ L2 - http://www.rjme.ro/RJME/resources/files/60041913911395.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -