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Impact on mental health and perceptions of psychological care among medical and nursing staff in Wuhan during the 2019 novel coronavirus disease outbreak: A cross-sectional study.
Brain Behav Immun. 2020 07; 87:11-17.BB

Abstract

The severe 2019 outbreak of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which was first reported in Wuhan, would be expected to impact the mental health of local medical and nursing staff and thus lead them to seek help. However, those outcomes have yet to be established using epidemiological data. To explore the mental health status of medical and nursing staff and the efficacy, or lack thereof, of critically connecting psychological needs to receiving psychological care, we conducted a quantitative study. This is the first paper on the mental health of medical and nursing staff in Wuhan. Notably, among 994 medical and nursing staff working in Wuhan, 36.9% had subthreshold mental health disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 2.4), 34.4% had mild disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 5.4), 22.4% had moderate disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 9.0), and 6.2% had severe disturbance (mean PHQ-9: 15.1) in the immediate wake of the viral epidemic. The noted burden fell particularly heavily on young women. Of all participants, 36.3% had accessed psychological materials (such as books on mental health), 50.4% had accessed psychological resources available through media (such as online push messages on mental health self-help coping methods), and 17.5% had participated in counseling or psychotherapy. Trends in levels of psychological distress and factors such as exposure to infected people and psychological assistance were identified. Although staff accessed limited mental healthcare services, distressed staff nonetheless saw these services as important resources to alleviate acute mental health disturbances and improve their physical health perceptions. These findings emphasize the importance of being prepared to support frontline workers through mental health interventions at times of widespread crisis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China.Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China.Computer Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China.Computer Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China.Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China.Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China.Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China.Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China.Department of Nursing, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China.School of Health Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430000, China.Department of Psychiatry, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310003, China.Department of Psychiatry, First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001, China.Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China.Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, United States. Electronic address: Cim009@ucsd.edu.Department of Psychiatry, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China. Electronic address: zcliu6@whu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32240764

Citation

Kang, Lijun, et al. "Impact On Mental Health and Perceptions of Psychological Care Among Medical and Nursing Staff in Wuhan During the 2019 Novel Coronavirus Disease Outbreak: a Cross-sectional Study." Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, vol. 87, 2020, pp. 11-17.
Kang L, Ma S, Chen M, et al. Impact on mental health and perceptions of psychological care among medical and nursing staff in Wuhan during the 2019 novel coronavirus disease outbreak: A cross-sectional study. Brain Behav Immun. 2020;87:11-17.
Kang, L., Ma, S., Chen, M., Yang, J., Wang, Y., Li, R., Yao, L., Bai, H., Cai, Z., Xiang Yang, B., Hu, S., Zhang, K., Wang, G., Ma, C., & Liu, Z. (2020). Impact on mental health and perceptions of psychological care among medical and nursing staff in Wuhan during the 2019 novel coronavirus disease outbreak: A cross-sectional study. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 87, 11-17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2020.03.028
Kang L, et al. Impact On Mental Health and Perceptions of Psychological Care Among Medical and Nursing Staff in Wuhan During the 2019 Novel Coronavirus Disease Outbreak: a Cross-sectional Study. Brain Behav Immun. 2020;87:11-17. PubMed PMID: 32240764.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact on mental health and perceptions of psychological care among medical and nursing staff in Wuhan during the 2019 novel coronavirus disease outbreak: A cross-sectional study. AU - Kang,Lijun, AU - Ma,Simeng, AU - Chen,Min, AU - Yang,Jun, AU - Wang,Ying, AU - Li,Ruiting, AU - Yao,Lihua, AU - Bai,Hanping, AU - Cai,Zhongxiang, AU - Xiang Yang,Bing, AU - Hu,Shaohua, AU - Zhang,Kerang, AU - Wang,Gaohua, AU - Ma,Ci, AU - Liu,Zhongchun, Y1 - 2020/03/30/ PY - 2020/03/15/received PY - 2020/03/27/revised PY - 2020/03/28/accepted PY - 2020/4/3/pubmed PY - 2020/7/3/medline PY - 2020/4/3/entrez KW - 2019 novel coronavirus disease KW - Exposure KW - Medical and nursing staff KW - Mental health KW - Mental healthcare SP - 11 EP - 17 JF - Brain, behavior, and immunity JO - Brain Behav Immun VL - 87 N2 - The severe 2019 outbreak of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which was first reported in Wuhan, would be expected to impact the mental health of local medical and nursing staff and thus lead them to seek help. However, those outcomes have yet to be established using epidemiological data. To explore the mental health status of medical and nursing staff and the efficacy, or lack thereof, of critically connecting psychological needs to receiving psychological care, we conducted a quantitative study. This is the first paper on the mental health of medical and nursing staff in Wuhan. Notably, among 994 medical and nursing staff working in Wuhan, 36.9% had subthreshold mental health disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 2.4), 34.4% had mild disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 5.4), 22.4% had moderate disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 9.0), and 6.2% had severe disturbance (mean PHQ-9: 15.1) in the immediate wake of the viral epidemic. The noted burden fell particularly heavily on young women. Of all participants, 36.3% had accessed psychological materials (such as books on mental health), 50.4% had accessed psychological resources available through media (such as online push messages on mental health self-help coping methods), and 17.5% had participated in counseling or psychotherapy. Trends in levels of psychological distress and factors such as exposure to infected people and psychological assistance were identified. Although staff accessed limited mental healthcare services, distressed staff nonetheless saw these services as important resources to alleviate acute mental health disturbances and improve their physical health perceptions. These findings emphasize the importance of being prepared to support frontline workers through mental health interventions at times of widespread crisis. SN - 1090-2139 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32240764/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0889-1591(20)30348-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -