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Dysbiosis of saliva microbiome in patients with oral lichen planus.
BMC Microbiol. 2020 04 03; 20(1):75.BM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Oral microbiota is not only important for maintaining oral health but also plays a role in various oral diseases. However, studies regarding microbiome changes in oral lichen planus (OLP) are very limited. To the best of our knowledge, there has been only two studies investigating salivary microbiome changes in OLP. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the characteristic microbial profile in the saliva of OLP patients, with or without erosive lesions, and compare that with recurrent aphthous ulcer (RAU), a common oral immunological disorder that also shows multiple erosive/ulcerative lesions. Whole saliva samples were collected from 20 patients with OLP (erosive E, n = 10 and non-erosive NE, n = 10), 10 patients with RAU (U) and 10 healthy controls (C). DNA was extracted from the saliva samples, and the 16S rDNA gene V4 hypervariable region was analyzed using Illumina sequencing.

RESULTS

We obtained 4949 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from the V4 region in all saliva samples. Community composition analysis showed a clear decreased relative abundance of genera Streptococcus and Sphingomonas in saliva from RAU patients when compared to the other three groups. Relative abundance of Lautropia and Gemella were higher in E group, whereas relative abundance of Haemophilus and Neisseria were higher in NE group when compared to C group. Abiotrophia and Oribacterium were higher in OLP (combining E and NE groups), while Eikenella and Aggregatibacter were lower when compared to C group. There was statistically significance in α-diversity between E and RAU groups(p < 0.05). Significant differences in β-diversity were detected in bacteria between E and C; NE and C; as well as E and NE groups. The LDA effect size algorithm identified the g_Haemophilus might be the potential biomarker in NE group.

CONCLUSIONS

We found that salivary microbiome in erosive OLP was significantly different from that found in RAU; and these changes may be related to the underlying disease process rather than presence of ulcerative/erosive lesions clinically. In addition, our findings in bacterial relative abundance in OLP were significantly different from the previously reported findings, which points to the need for further research in salivary microbiome of OLP.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Oral Medicine, Shanxi Medical University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Taiyuan, 030001, Shanxi, China.Department of Periodontology, Shanxi Medical University School and Hospital of Stomatology, No. 63, New South Road, Yingze District, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 030001, People's Republic of China.Department of Periodontology, Shanxi Medical University School and Hospital of Stomatology, No. 63, New South Road, Yingze District, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 030001, People's Republic of China.Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Texas A & M University College of Dentistry, Dallas, TX, USA.Department of Oral Medicine, Shanxi Medical University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Taiyuan, 030001, Shanxi, China.Department of Periodontology, Shanxi Medical University School and Hospital of Stomatology, No. 63, New South Road, Yingze District, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 030001, People's Republic of China.Department of Oral Medicine, Shanxi Medical University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Taiyuan, 030001, Shanxi, China.Department of Periodontology, Shanxi Medical University School and Hospital of Stomatology, No. 63, New South Road, Yingze District, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 030001, People's Republic of China.Shanxi Medical University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Taiyuan, 030001, Shanxi, China.Department of Periodontology, Shanxi Medical University School and Hospital of Stomatology, No. 63, New South Road, Yingze District, Taiyuan, Shanxi, 030001, People's Republic of China. rxy611@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32245419

Citation

Yu, Fei Yan, et al. "Dysbiosis of Saliva Microbiome in Patients With Oral Lichen Planus." BMC Microbiology, vol. 20, no. 1, 2020, p. 75.
Yu FY, Wang QQ, Li M, et al. Dysbiosis of saliva microbiome in patients with oral lichen planus. BMC Microbiol. 2020;20(1):75.
Yu, F. Y., Wang, Q. Q., Li, M., Cheng, Y. H., Cheng, Y. L., Zhou, Y., Yang, X., Zhang, F., Ge, X., Zhao, B., & Ren, X. Y. (2020). Dysbiosis of saliva microbiome in patients with oral lichen planus. BMC Microbiology, 20(1), 75. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12866-020-01733-7
Yu FY, et al. Dysbiosis of Saliva Microbiome in Patients With Oral Lichen Planus. BMC Microbiol. 2020 04 3;20(1):75. PubMed PMID: 32245419.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dysbiosis of saliva microbiome in patients with oral lichen planus. AU - Yu,Fei Yan, AU - Wang,Qian Qian, AU - Li,Miao, AU - Cheng,Ya-Hsin, AU - Cheng,Yi-Shing Lisa, AU - Zhou,Yu, AU - Yang,Xi, AU - Zhang,Fang, AU - Ge,Xuejun, AU - Zhao,Bin, AU - Ren,Xiu Yun, Y1 - 2020/04/03/ PY - 2019/10/25/received PY - 2020/02/21/accepted PY - 2020/4/5/entrez PY - 2020/4/5/pubmed PY - 2020/4/5/medline KW - 16S rDNA KW - High-throughput sequencing KW - Oral lichen planus KW - Salivary microbiome SP - 75 EP - 75 JF - BMC microbiology JO - BMC Microbiol VL - 20 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Oral microbiota is not only important for maintaining oral health but also plays a role in various oral diseases. However, studies regarding microbiome changes in oral lichen planus (OLP) are very limited. To the best of our knowledge, there has been only two studies investigating salivary microbiome changes in OLP. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify the characteristic microbial profile in the saliva of OLP patients, with or without erosive lesions, and compare that with recurrent aphthous ulcer (RAU), a common oral immunological disorder that also shows multiple erosive/ulcerative lesions. Whole saliva samples were collected from 20 patients with OLP (erosive E, n = 10 and non-erosive NE, n = 10), 10 patients with RAU (U) and 10 healthy controls (C). DNA was extracted from the saliva samples, and the 16S rDNA gene V4 hypervariable region was analyzed using Illumina sequencing. RESULTS: We obtained 4949 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from the V4 region in all saliva samples. Community composition analysis showed a clear decreased relative abundance of genera Streptococcus and Sphingomonas in saliva from RAU patients when compared to the other three groups. Relative abundance of Lautropia and Gemella were higher in E group, whereas relative abundance of Haemophilus and Neisseria were higher in NE group when compared to C group. Abiotrophia and Oribacterium were higher in OLP (combining E and NE groups), while Eikenella and Aggregatibacter were lower when compared to C group. There was statistically significance in α-diversity between E and RAU groups(p < 0.05). Significant differences in β-diversity were detected in bacteria between E and C; NE and C; as well as E and NE groups. The LDA effect size algorithm identified the g_Haemophilus might be the potential biomarker in NE group. CONCLUSIONS: We found that salivary microbiome in erosive OLP was significantly different from that found in RAU; and these changes may be related to the underlying disease process rather than presence of ulcerative/erosive lesions clinically. In addition, our findings in bacterial relative abundance in OLP were significantly different from the previously reported findings, which points to the need for further research in salivary microbiome of OLP. SN - 1471-2180 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32245419/Dysbiosis_of_saliva_microbiome_in_patients_with_oral_lichen_planus_ L2 - https://bmcmicrobiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12866-020-01733-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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