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Infection and Rapid Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Ferrets.
Cell Host Microbe. 2020 05 13; 27(5):704-709.e2.CH

Abstract

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in China and rapidly spread worldwide. To prevent SARS-CoV-2 dissemination, understanding the in vivo characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 is a high priority. We report a ferret model of SARS-CoV-2 infection and transmission that recapitulates aspects of human disease. SARS-CoV-2-infected ferrets exhibit elevated body temperatures and virus replication. Although fatalities were not observed, SARS-CoV-2-infected ferrets shed virus in nasal washes, saliva, urine, and feces up to 8 days post-infection. At 2 days post-contact, SARS-CoV-2 was detected in all naive direct contact ferrets. Furthermore, a few naive indirect contact ferrets were positive for viral RNA, suggesting airborne transmission. Viral antigens were detected in nasal turbinate, trachea, lungs, and intestine with acute bronchiolitis present in infected lungs. Thus, ferrets represent an infection and transmission animal model of COVID-19 that may facilitate development of SARS-CoV-2 therapeutics and vaccines.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Research institute of Public Health, National Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Research institute of Public Health, National Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Research institute of Public Health, National Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Research institute of Public Health, National Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Research institute of Public Health, National Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.Infectious Disease Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.Division of Virology, Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. Electronic address: jaeujung@med.usc.edu.College of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea; Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: choiki55@chungbuk.ac.kr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32259477

Citation

Kim, Young-Il, et al. "Infection and Rapid Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Ferrets." Cell Host & Microbe, vol. 27, no. 5, 2020, pp. 704-709.e2.
Kim YI, Kim SG, Kim SM, et al. Infection and Rapid Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Ferrets. Cell Host Microbe. 2020;27(5):704-709.e2.
Kim, Y. I., Kim, S. G., Kim, S. M., Kim, E. H., Park, S. J., Yu, K. M., Chang, J. H., Kim, E. J., Lee, S., Casel, M. A. B., Um, J., Song, M. S., Jeong, H. W., Lai, V. D., Kim, Y., Chin, B. S., Park, J. S., Chung, K. H., Foo, S. S., ... Choi, Y. K. (2020). Infection and Rapid Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Ferrets. Cell Host & Microbe, 27(5), 704-e2. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2020.03.023
Kim YI, et al. Infection and Rapid Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Ferrets. Cell Host Microbe. 2020 05 13;27(5):704-709.e2. PubMed PMID: 32259477.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infection and Rapid Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Ferrets. AU - Kim,Young-Il, AU - Kim,Seong-Gyu, AU - Kim,Se-Mi, AU - Kim,Eun-Ha, AU - Park,Su-Jin, AU - Yu,Kwang-Min, AU - Chang,Jae-Hyung, AU - Kim,Eun Ji, AU - Lee,Seunghun, AU - Casel,Mark Anthony B, AU - Um,Jihye, AU - Song,Min-Suk, AU - Jeong,Hye Won, AU - Lai,Van Dam, AU - Kim,Yeonjae, AU - Chin,Bum Sik, AU - Park,Jun-Sun, AU - Chung,Ki-Hyun, AU - Foo,Suan-Sin, AU - Poo,Haryoung, AU - Mo,In-Pil, AU - Lee,Ok-Jun, AU - Webby,Richard J, AU - Jung,Jae U, AU - Choi,Young Ki, Y1 - 2020/04/06/ PY - 2020/02/27/received PY - 2020/03/16/revised PY - 2020/03/27/accepted PY - 2020/4/8/pubmed PY - 2020/5/19/medline PY - 2020/4/8/entrez KW - 2019-nCoV KW - 2019-novel coronavirus KW - COVID-19 KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - ferrets KW - novel coronavirus disease KW - severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 KW - transmission KW - virus shedding SP - 704 EP - 709.e2 JF - Cell host & microbe JO - Cell Host Microbe VL - 27 IS - 5 N2 - The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in China and rapidly spread worldwide. To prevent SARS-CoV-2 dissemination, understanding the in vivo characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 is a high priority. We report a ferret model of SARS-CoV-2 infection and transmission that recapitulates aspects of human disease. SARS-CoV-2-infected ferrets exhibit elevated body temperatures and virus replication. Although fatalities were not observed, SARS-CoV-2-infected ferrets shed virus in nasal washes, saliva, urine, and feces up to 8 days post-infection. At 2 days post-contact, SARS-CoV-2 was detected in all naive direct contact ferrets. Furthermore, a few naive indirect contact ferrets were positive for viral RNA, suggesting airborne transmission. Viral antigens were detected in nasal turbinate, trachea, lungs, and intestine with acute bronchiolitis present in infected lungs. Thus, ferrets represent an infection and transmission animal model of COVID-19 that may facilitate development of SARS-CoV-2 therapeutics and vaccines. SN - 1934-6069 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32259477/Infection_and_Rapid_Transmission_of_SARS_CoV_2_in_Ferrets_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1931-3128(20)30187-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -