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Mental Health and Psychosocial Problems of Medical Health Workers during the COVID-19 Epidemic in China.
Psychother Psychosom. 2020; 89(4):242-250.PP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We explored whether medical health workers had more psychosocial problems than nonmedical health workers during the COVID-19 outbreak.

METHODS

An online survey was run from February 19 to March 6, 2020; a total of 2,182 Chinese subjects participated. Mental health variables were assessed via the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), the Symptom Check List-revised (SCL-90-R), and the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4), which included a 2-item anxiety scale and a 2-item depression scale (PHQ-2).

RESULTS

Compared with nonmedical health workers (n = 1,255), medical health workers (n = 927) had a higher prevalence of insomnia (38.4 vs. 30.5%, p < 0.01), anxiety (13.0 vs. 8.5%, p < 0.01), depression (12.2 vs. 9.5%; p< 0.04), somatization (1.6 vs. 0.4%; p < 0.01), and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (5.3 vs. 2.2%; p < 0.01). They also had higher total scores of ISI, GAD-2, PHQ-2, and SCL-90-R obsessive-compulsive symptoms (p ≤ 0.01). Among medical health workers, having organic disease was an independent factor for insomnia, anxiety, depression, somatization, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (p < 0.05 or 0.01). Living in rural areas, being female, and being at risk of contact with COVID-19 patients were the most common risk factors for insomnia, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and depression (p < 0.01 or 0.05). Among nonmedical health workers, having organic disease was a risk factor for insomnia, depression, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (p < 0.01 or 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

During the COVID-19 outbreak, medical health workers had psychosocial problems and risk factors for developing them. They were in need of attention and recovery programs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. Department of Neurology, Beijing Puren Hospital, Beijing, China.Medical Research and Biometrics Center, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Beijing Institute of Brain Disorders, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Department of Psychiatry, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.Department of Neurology, The 3rd People's Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu, China.School of Psychology, Capital Normal University, Beijing, China.School of Life Sciences, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. Beijing Key Laboratory of Neuromodulation, Beijing, China. Center of Epilepsy, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.Clinical Psychology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.Division of Neuropsychiatry and Psychosomatics,Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China, wanghongxing@xwh.ccmu.edu.cn. Beijing Key Laboratory of Neuromodulation, Beijing, China, wanghongxing@xwh.ccmu.edu.cn. Center of Epilepsy, Beijing Institute for Brain Disorders, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China, wanghongxing@xwh.ccmu.edu.cn. Beijing Psychosomatic Disease Consultation Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China, wanghongxing@xwh.ccmu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32272480

Citation

Zhang, Wen-Rui, et al. "Mental Health and Psychosocial Problems of Medical Health Workers During the COVID-19 Epidemic in China." Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, vol. 89, no. 4, 2020, pp. 242-250.
Zhang WR, Wang K, Yin L, et al. Mental Health and Psychosocial Problems of Medical Health Workers during the COVID-19 Epidemic in China. Psychother Psychosom. 2020;89(4):242-250.
Zhang, W. R., Wang, K., Yin, L., Zhao, W. F., Xue, Q., Peng, M., Min, B. Q., Tian, Q., Leng, H. X., Du, J. L., Chang, H., Yang, Y., Li, W., Shangguan, F. F., Yan, T. Y., Dong, H. Q., Han, Y., Wang, Y. P., Cosci, F., & Wang, H. X. (2020). Mental Health and Psychosocial Problems of Medical Health Workers during the COVID-19 Epidemic in China. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 89(4), 242-250. https://doi.org/10.1159/000507639
Zhang WR, et al. Mental Health and Psychosocial Problems of Medical Health Workers During the COVID-19 Epidemic in China. Psychother Psychosom. 2020;89(4):242-250. PubMed PMID: 32272480.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mental Health and Psychosocial Problems of Medical Health Workers during the COVID-19 Epidemic in China. AU - Zhang,Wen-Rui, AU - Wang,Kun, AU - Yin,Lu, AU - Zhao,Wen-Feng, AU - Xue,Qing, AU - Peng,Mao, AU - Min,Bao-Quan, AU - Tian,Qing, AU - Leng,Hai-Xia, AU - Du,Jia-Lin, AU - Chang,Hong, AU - Yang,Yuan, AU - Li,Wei, AU - Shangguan,Fang-Fang, AU - Yan,Tian-Yi, AU - Dong,Hui-Qing, AU - Han,Ying, AU - Wang,Yu-Ping, AU - Cosci,Fiammetta, AU - Wang,Hong-Xing, Y1 - 2020/04/09/ PY - 2020/03/21/received PY - 2020/03/30/accepted PY - 2020/4/10/pubmed PY - 2020/7/18/medline PY - 2020/4/10/entrez KW - COVID-19 KW - Corona virus KW - Health workers KW - Mental health KW - Psychosocial problems SP - 242 EP - 250 JF - Psychotherapy and psychosomatics JO - Psychother Psychosom VL - 89 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We explored whether medical health workers had more psychosocial problems than nonmedical health workers during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: An online survey was run from February 19 to March 6, 2020; a total of 2,182 Chinese subjects participated. Mental health variables were assessed via the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), the Symptom Check List-revised (SCL-90-R), and the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4), which included a 2-item anxiety scale and a 2-item depression scale (PHQ-2). RESULTS: Compared with nonmedical health workers (n = 1,255), medical health workers (n = 927) had a higher prevalence of insomnia (38.4 vs. 30.5%, p < 0.01), anxiety (13.0 vs. 8.5%, p < 0.01), depression (12.2 vs. 9.5%; p< 0.04), somatization (1.6 vs. 0.4%; p < 0.01), and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (5.3 vs. 2.2%; p < 0.01). They also had higher total scores of ISI, GAD-2, PHQ-2, and SCL-90-R obsessive-compulsive symptoms (p ≤ 0.01). Among medical health workers, having organic disease was an independent factor for insomnia, anxiety, depression, somatization, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (p < 0.05 or 0.01). Living in rural areas, being female, and being at risk of contact with COVID-19 patients were the most common risk factors for insomnia, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and depression (p < 0.01 or 0.05). Among nonmedical health workers, having organic disease was a risk factor for insomnia, depression, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms (p < 0.01 or 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 outbreak, medical health workers had psychosocial problems and risk factors for developing them. They were in need of attention and recovery programs. SN - 1423-0348 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32272480/Mental_Health_and_Psychosocial_Problems_of_Medical_Health_Workers_during_the_COVID_19_Epidemic_in_China_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -