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Health and Education Officials' Perspectives on the Impact of Typhoon Haiyan on Mass Drug Administration for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections in the Philippines.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2020 Apr 13 [Online ahead of print]DM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

In the Philippines, morbidity control of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections is done through mass drug administration (MDA) of anthelmintics to school-age children (SAC). In 2013, the Philippines was devastated by the deadliest cyclone ever recorded, Typhoon Haiyan. The study aimed to understand the impact of Typhoon Haiyan on the MDA of anthelmintics to SAC in the provinces of Capiz and Iloilo in the Philippines from the perspectives of local health and education officials.

METHODS

The study was conducted in the municipalities of Panay and Pilar in Capiz and the municipalities of Estancia and Sara in Iloilo, areas that were devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. Qualitative, semi-structured key informant interviews were conducted with 16 total participants, which included officials of the Department of Health, Department of Education, and concerned local government units. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded in an open, iterative manner. Codes were reviewed to identify patterns and themes.

RESULTS

Participants described the following themes: (1) their perception that the typhoon had no effect on the MDA program or on resources necessary to complete the program; (2) the program's simple design allowed for 1-time administration to a pre-assembled population; (3) the program allowed a sense of community cohesiveness; (4) the program served as a vehicle for altruism, particularly regarding helping needy children, in this time of calamity.

CONCLUSIONS

Our informants perceived that the MDA program in Region VI was not affected by Typhoon Haiyan. They attributed the resilience to the program's simple procedure, attitudes of altruism, program importance, and community cohesiveness. Despite Typhoon Haiyan's mass destruction of infrastructure and livelihood leading to incredible challenges, mobilization of the community allowed for the continuation and successful implementation of the MDA program. The experience of Region VI may serve as a model for other low- and middle-income countries prone to natural disasters.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Department of Psychiatry, New York, New York.University of North Carolina Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.University of Philippines Manila College of Public Health, Manila, Philippines. Public Health Interventions Research Group, The Kirby Institute for Infection and Immunity in Society, Sydney, Australia.UPMC Division of Infectious Diseases, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.University of Pittsburgh Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and of Internal Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Magee-Womens Research Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Institute for Clinical Research Education, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.University of Philippines Manila College of Public Health, Manila, Philippines.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32279688

Citation

Chernoff, Eva, et al. "Health and Education Officials' Perspectives On the Impact of Typhoon Haiyan On Mass Drug Administration for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections in the Philippines." Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 2020, pp. 1-5.
Chernoff E, Silverstein G, Delos Trinos JPCR, et al. Health and Education Officials' Perspectives on the Impact of Typhoon Haiyan on Mass Drug Administration for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections in the Philippines. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2020.
Chernoff, E., Silverstein, G., Delos Trinos, J. P. C. R., Veldkamp, P., Chang, J. C., & Belizario, V. Y. (2020). Health and Education Officials' Perspectives on the Impact of Typhoon Haiyan on Mass Drug Administration for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections in the Philippines. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 1-5. https://doi.org/10.1017/dmp.2020.34
Chernoff E, et al. Health and Education Officials' Perspectives On the Impact of Typhoon Haiyan On Mass Drug Administration for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections in the Philippines. Disaster Med Public Health Prep. 2020 Apr 13;1-5. PubMed PMID: 32279688.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health and Education Officials' Perspectives on the Impact of Typhoon Haiyan on Mass Drug Administration for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections in the Philippines. AU - Chernoff,Eva, AU - Silverstein,Gina, AU - Delos Trinos,John Paul Caesar R, AU - Veldkamp,Peter, AU - Chang,Judy C, AU - Belizario,Vicente Y, Y1 - 2020/04/13/ PY - 2020/4/14/entrez KW - Typhoon Haiyan KW - hurricane KW - mass drug administration KW - neglected tropical disease KW - soil-transmitted helminth infection SP - 1 EP - 5 JF - Disaster medicine and public health preparedness JO - Disaster Med Public Health Prep N2 - OBJECTIVES: In the Philippines, morbidity control of soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections is done through mass drug administration (MDA) of anthelmintics to school-age children (SAC). In 2013, the Philippines was devastated by the deadliest cyclone ever recorded, Typhoon Haiyan. The study aimed to understand the impact of Typhoon Haiyan on the MDA of anthelmintics to SAC in the provinces of Capiz and Iloilo in the Philippines from the perspectives of local health and education officials. METHODS: The study was conducted in the municipalities of Panay and Pilar in Capiz and the municipalities of Estancia and Sara in Iloilo, areas that were devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. Qualitative, semi-structured key informant interviews were conducted with 16 total participants, which included officials of the Department of Health, Department of Education, and concerned local government units. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded in an open, iterative manner. Codes were reviewed to identify patterns and themes. RESULTS: Participants described the following themes: (1) their perception that the typhoon had no effect on the MDA program or on resources necessary to complete the program; (2) the program's simple design allowed for 1-time administration to a pre-assembled population; (3) the program allowed a sense of community cohesiveness; (4) the program served as a vehicle for altruism, particularly regarding helping needy children, in this time of calamity. CONCLUSIONS: Our informants perceived that the MDA program in Region VI was not affected by Typhoon Haiyan. They attributed the resilience to the program's simple procedure, attitudes of altruism, program importance, and community cohesiveness. Despite Typhoon Haiyan's mass destruction of infrastructure and livelihood leading to incredible challenges, mobilization of the community allowed for the continuation and successful implementation of the MDA program. The experience of Region VI may serve as a model for other low- and middle-income countries prone to natural disasters. SN - 1938-744X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32279688/Health_and_Education_Officials'_Perspectives_on_the_Impact_of_Typhoon_Haiyan_on_Mass_Drug_Administration_for_Soil_Transmitted_Helminth_Infections_in_the_Philippines_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1935789320000348/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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