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A Review of SARS-CoV-2 and the Ongoing Clinical Trials.
Int J Mol Sci. 2020 Apr 10; 21(7)IJ

Abstract

The sudden outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV, later named SARS-CoV-2) in Wuhan, China, which rapidly grew into a global pandemic, marked the third introduction of a virulent coronavirus into the human society, affecting not only the healthcare system, but also the global economy. Although our understanding of coronaviruses has undergone a huge leap after two precedents, the effective approaches to treatment and epidemiological control are still lacking. In this article, we present a succinct overview of the epidemiology, clinical features, and molecular characteristics of SARS-CoV-2. We summarize the current epidemiological and clinical data from the initial Wuhan studies, and emphasize several features of SARS-CoV-2, which differentiate it from SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), such as high variability of disease presentation. We systematize the current clinical trials that have been rapidly initiated after the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic. Whereas the trials on SARS-CoV-2 genome-based specific vaccines and therapeutic antibodies are currently being tested, this solution is more long-term, as they require thorough testing of their safety. On the other hand, the repurposing of the existing therapeutic agents previously designed for other virus infections and pathologies happens to be the only practical approach as a rapid response measure to the emergent pandemic, as most of these agents have already been tested for their safety. These agents can be divided into two broad categories, those that can directly target the virus replication cycle, and those based on immunotherapy approaches either aimed to boost innate antiviral immune responses or alleviate damage induced by dysregulated inflammatory responses. The initial clinical studies revealed the promising therapeutic potential of several of such drugs, including favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral drug that interferes with the viral replication, and hydroxychloroquine, the repurposed antimalarial drug that interferes with the virus endosomal entry pathway. We speculate that the current pandemic emergency will be a trigger for more systematic drug repurposing design approaches based on big data analysis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan.Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan.Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan.Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan.School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan. Department of Chest Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan.School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan. Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan.Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan.Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan.Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan.Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan. Institute of Food Safety and Health Risk Assessment, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan.Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan. Institute of Food Safety and Health Risk Assessment, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan.Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11217, Taiwan. School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan. Institute of Pharmacology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan. Genomic Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32290293

Citation

Tu, Yung-Fang, et al. "A Review of SARS-CoV-2 and the Ongoing Clinical Trials." International Journal of Molecular Sciences, vol. 21, no. 7, 2020.
Tu YF, Chien CS, Yarmishyn AA, et al. A Review of SARS-CoV-2 and the Ongoing Clinical Trials. Int J Mol Sci. 2020;21(7).
Tu, Y. F., Chien, C. S., Yarmishyn, A. A., Lin, Y. Y., Luo, Y. H., Lin, Y. T., Lai, W. Y., Yang, D. M., Chou, S. J., Yang, Y. P., Wang, M. L., & Chiou, S. H. (2020). A Review of SARS-CoV-2 and the Ongoing Clinical Trials. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 21(7). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21072657
Tu YF, et al. A Review of SARS-CoV-2 and the Ongoing Clinical Trials. Int J Mol Sci. 2020 Apr 10;21(7) PubMed PMID: 32290293.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Review of SARS-CoV-2 and the Ongoing Clinical Trials. AU - Tu,Yung-Fang, AU - Chien,Chian-Shiu, AU - Yarmishyn,Aliaksandr A, AU - Lin,Yi-Ying, AU - Luo,Yung-Hung, AU - Lin,Yi-Tsung, AU - Lai,Wei-Yi, AU - Yang,De-Ming, AU - Chou,Shih-Jie, AU - Yang,Yi-Ping, AU - Wang,Mong-Lien, AU - Chiou,Shih-Hwa, Y1 - 2020/04/10/ PY - 2020/03/12/received PY - 2020/04/07/revised PY - 2020/04/08/accepted PY - 2020/4/16/entrez PY - 2020/4/16/pubmed PY - 2020/4/17/medline KW - ACE2 KW - COVID-19 KW - SARS-CoV-2 KW - clinical trials KW - immunotherapy KW - pneumonia KW - replicase KW - vaccine JF - International journal of molecular sciences JO - Int J Mol Sci VL - 21 IS - 7 N2 - The sudden outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV, later named SARS-CoV-2) in Wuhan, China, which rapidly grew into a global pandemic, marked the third introduction of a virulent coronavirus into the human society, affecting not only the healthcare system, but also the global economy. Although our understanding of coronaviruses has undergone a huge leap after two precedents, the effective approaches to treatment and epidemiological control are still lacking. In this article, we present a succinct overview of the epidemiology, clinical features, and molecular characteristics of SARS-CoV-2. We summarize the current epidemiological and clinical data from the initial Wuhan studies, and emphasize several features of SARS-CoV-2, which differentiate it from SARS-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), such as high variability of disease presentation. We systematize the current clinical trials that have been rapidly initiated after the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic. Whereas the trials on SARS-CoV-2 genome-based specific vaccines and therapeutic antibodies are currently being tested, this solution is more long-term, as they require thorough testing of their safety. On the other hand, the repurposing of the existing therapeutic agents previously designed for other virus infections and pathologies happens to be the only practical approach as a rapid response measure to the emergent pandemic, as most of these agents have already been tested for their safety. These agents can be divided into two broad categories, those that can directly target the virus replication cycle, and those based on immunotherapy approaches either aimed to boost innate antiviral immune responses or alleviate damage induced by dysregulated inflammatory responses. The initial clinical studies revealed the promising therapeutic potential of several of such drugs, including favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral drug that interferes with the viral replication, and hydroxychloroquine, the repurposed antimalarial drug that interferes with the virus endosomal entry pathway. We speculate that the current pandemic emergency will be a trigger for more systematic drug repurposing design approaches based on big data analysis. SN - 1422-0067 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32290293/A_Review_of_SARS_CoV_2_and_the_Ongoing_Clinical_Trials_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijms21072657 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -