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Comparative pathogenesis of COVID-19, MERS, and SARS in a nonhuman primate model.
Science. 2020 05 29; 368(6494):1012-1015.Sci

Abstract

The current pandemic coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was recently identified in patients with an acute respiratory syndrome, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To compare its pathogenesis with that of previously emerging coronaviruses, we inoculated cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV-2 or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV and compared the pathology and virology with historical reports of SARS-CoV infections. In SARS-CoV-2-infected macaques, virus was excreted from nose and throat in the absence of clinical signs and detected in type I and II pneumocytes in foci of diffuse alveolar damage and in ciliated epithelial cells of nasal, bronchial, and bronchiolar mucosae. In SARS-CoV infection, lung lesions were typically more severe, whereas they were milder in MERS-CoV infection, where virus was detected mainly in type II pneumocytes. These data show that SARS-CoV-2 causes COVID-19-like disease in macaques and provides a new model to test preventive and therapeutic strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. b.rockx@erasmusmc.nl b.haagmans@erasmusmc.nl.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Viroclinics Xplore, Schaijk, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Virology, Biomedical Primate Research Centre, Rijswijk, Netherlands.Department of Virology, Biomedical Primate Research Centre, Rijswijk, Netherlands.Department of Virology, Biomedical Primate Research Centre, Rijswijk, Netherlands.Animal Science Department, Biomedical Primate Research Centre, Rijswijk, Netherlands. Population Health Sciences, Unit Animals in Science and Society, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Netherlands.Institute of Virology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.Erasmus Laboratory Animal Science Center, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.Department of Viroscience, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands. b.rockx@erasmusmc.nl b.haagmans@erasmusmc.nl.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32303590

Citation

Rockx, Barry, et al. "Comparative Pathogenesis of COVID-19, MERS, and SARS in a Nonhuman Primate Model." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 368, no. 6494, 2020, pp. 1012-1015.
Rockx B, Kuiken T, Herfst S, et al. Comparative pathogenesis of COVID-19, MERS, and SARS in a nonhuman primate model. Science. 2020;368(6494):1012-1015.
Rockx, B., Kuiken, T., Herfst, S., Bestebroer, T., Lamers, M. M., Oude Munnink, B. B., de Meulder, D., van Amerongen, G., van den Brand, J., Okba, N. M. A., Schipper, D., van Run, P., Leijten, L., Sikkema, R., Verschoor, E., Verstrepen, B., Bogers, W., Langermans, J., Drosten, C., ... Haagmans, B. L. (2020). Comparative pathogenesis of COVID-19, MERS, and SARS in a nonhuman primate model. Science (New York, N.Y.), 368(6494), 1012-1015. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.abb7314
Rockx B, et al. Comparative Pathogenesis of COVID-19, MERS, and SARS in a Nonhuman Primate Model. Science. 2020 05 29;368(6494):1012-1015. PubMed PMID: 32303590.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparative pathogenesis of COVID-19, MERS, and SARS in a nonhuman primate model. AU - Rockx,Barry, AU - Kuiken,Thijs, AU - Herfst,Sander, AU - Bestebroer,Theo, AU - Lamers,Mart M, AU - Oude Munnink,Bas B, AU - de Meulder,Dennis, AU - van Amerongen,Geert, AU - van den Brand,Judith, AU - Okba,Nisreen M A, AU - Schipper,Debby, AU - van Run,Peter, AU - Leijten,Lonneke, AU - Sikkema,Reina, AU - Verschoor,Ernst, AU - Verstrepen,Babs, AU - Bogers,Willy, AU - Langermans,Jan, AU - Drosten,Christian, AU - Fentener van Vlissingen,Martje, AU - Fouchier,Ron, AU - de Swart,Rik, AU - Koopmans,Marion, AU - Haagmans,Bart L, Y1 - 2020/04/17/ PY - 2020/03/15/received PY - 2020/04/15/accepted PY - 2020/4/19/pubmed PY - 2020/6/3/medline PY - 2020/4/19/entrez SP - 1012 EP - 1015 JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 368 IS - 6494 N2 - The current pandemic coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was recently identified in patients with an acute respiratory syndrome, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). To compare its pathogenesis with that of previously emerging coronaviruses, we inoculated cynomolgus macaques with SARS-CoV-2 or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV and compared the pathology and virology with historical reports of SARS-CoV infections. In SARS-CoV-2-infected macaques, virus was excreted from nose and throat in the absence of clinical signs and detected in type I and II pneumocytes in foci of diffuse alveolar damage and in ciliated epithelial cells of nasal, bronchial, and bronchiolar mucosae. In SARS-CoV infection, lung lesions were typically more severe, whereas they were milder in MERS-CoV infection, where virus was detected mainly in type II pneumocytes. These data show that SARS-CoV-2 causes COVID-19-like disease in macaques and provides a new model to test preventive and therapeutic strategies. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32303590/Comparative_pathogenesis_of_COVID_19_MERS_and_SARS_in_a_nonhuman_primate_model_ L2 - https://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=32303590 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -