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Genetic dissection of heat-responsive physiological traits to improve adaptation and increase yield potential in soft winter wheat.
BMC Genomics. 2020 Apr 20; 21(1):315.BG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Climate change, including higher temperatures (HT) has a detrimental impact on wheat productivity and modeling studies predict more frequent heat waves in the future. Wheat growth can be impaired by high daytime and nighttime temperature at any developmental stage, especially during the grain filling stage. Leaf chlorophyll content, leaf greenness, cell membrane thermostability, and canopy temperature have been proposed as candidate traits to improve crop adaptation and yield potential of wheat under HT. Nonetheless, a significant gap exists in knowledge of genetic backgrounds associated with these physiological traits. Identifying genetic loci associated with these traits can facilitate physiological breeding for increased yield potential under high temperature stress condition in wheat.

RESULTS

We conducted genome-wide association study (GWAS) on a 236 elite soft wheat association mapping panel using 27,466 high quality single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The panel was phenotyped for three years in two locations where heat shock was common. GWAS identified 500 significant marker-trait associations (MTAs) (p ≤ 9.99 × 10- 4). Ten MTAs with pleiotropic effects detected on chromosomes 1D, 2B, 3A, 3B, 6A, 7B, and 7D are potentially important targets for selection. Five MTAs associated with physiological traits had pleiotropic effects on grain yield and yield-related traits. Seventy-five MTAs were consistently expressed over several environments indicating stability and more than half of these stable MTAs were found in genes encoding different types of proteins associated with heat stress.

CONCLUSIONS

We identified 500 significant MTAs in soft winter wheat under HT stress. We found several stable loci across environments and pleiotropic markers controlling physiological and agronomic traits. After further validation, these MTAs can be used in marker-assisted selection and breeding to develop varieties with high stability for grain yield under high temperature.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Agronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Agronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. mababar@ufl.edu.USDA-ARS, Manhattan, Kansas, USA.Department of Agronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Agronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Agronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Agronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.Department of Agronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.USDA-ARS, Wooster, OH, USA.North Florida Research and Education Cente, Quincy, FL, USA.LSU AgCenter - SPESS, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Genomics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.USDA-ARS, Manhattan, KS, USA.Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32312234

Citation

Pradhan, Sumit, et al. "Genetic Dissection of Heat-responsive Physiological Traits to Improve Adaptation and Increase Yield Potential in Soft Winter Wheat." BMC Genomics, vol. 21, no. 1, 2020, p. 315.
Pradhan S, Babar MA, Bai G, et al. Genetic dissection of heat-responsive physiological traits to improve adaptation and increase yield potential in soft winter wheat. BMC Genomics. 2020;21(1):315.
Pradhan, S., Babar, M. A., Bai, G., Khan, J., Shahi, D., Avci, M., Guo, J., McBreen, J., Asseng, S., Gezan, S., Baik, B. K., Blount, A., Harrison, S., Sapkota, S., St Amand, P., & Kunwar, S. (2020). Genetic dissection of heat-responsive physiological traits to improve adaptation and increase yield potential in soft winter wheat. BMC Genomics, 21(1), 315. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12864-020-6717-7
Pradhan S, et al. Genetic Dissection of Heat-responsive Physiological Traits to Improve Adaptation and Increase Yield Potential in Soft Winter Wheat. BMC Genomics. 2020 Apr 20;21(1):315. PubMed PMID: 32312234.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genetic dissection of heat-responsive physiological traits to improve adaptation and increase yield potential in soft winter wheat. AU - Pradhan,Sumit, AU - Babar,Md Ali, AU - Bai,Guihua, AU - Khan,Jahangir, AU - Shahi,Dipendra, AU - Avci,Muhsin, AU - Guo,Jia, AU - McBreen,Jordan, AU - Asseng,Senthold, AU - Gezan,Salvador, AU - Baik,Byung-Kee, AU - Blount,Ann, AU - Harrison,Stephen, AU - Sapkota,Suraj, AU - St Amand,Paul, AU - Kunwar,Sanju, Y1 - 2020/04/20/ PY - 2019/07/07/received PY - 2020/04/05/accepted PY - 2020/4/22/entrez PY - 2020/4/22/pubmed PY - 2021/1/12/medline KW - Genome-wide association study5 KW - Genotyping-by-sequencing2 KW - Marker-assisted breeding7 KW - Marker-trait associations3 KW - Physiological traits6 KW - Quantitative trait loci4 KW - Single nucleotide polymorphisms1 SP - 315 EP - 315 JF - BMC genomics JO - BMC Genomics VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Climate change, including higher temperatures (HT) has a detrimental impact on wheat productivity and modeling studies predict more frequent heat waves in the future. Wheat growth can be impaired by high daytime and nighttime temperature at any developmental stage, especially during the grain filling stage. Leaf chlorophyll content, leaf greenness, cell membrane thermostability, and canopy temperature have been proposed as candidate traits to improve crop adaptation and yield potential of wheat under HT. Nonetheless, a significant gap exists in knowledge of genetic backgrounds associated with these physiological traits. Identifying genetic loci associated with these traits can facilitate physiological breeding for increased yield potential under high temperature stress condition in wheat. RESULTS: We conducted genome-wide association study (GWAS) on a 236 elite soft wheat association mapping panel using 27,466 high quality single nucleotide polymorphism markers. The panel was phenotyped for three years in two locations where heat shock was common. GWAS identified 500 significant marker-trait associations (MTAs) (p ≤ 9.99 × 10- 4). Ten MTAs with pleiotropic effects detected on chromosomes 1D, 2B, 3A, 3B, 6A, 7B, and 7D are potentially important targets for selection. Five MTAs associated with physiological traits had pleiotropic effects on grain yield and yield-related traits. Seventy-five MTAs were consistently expressed over several environments indicating stability and more than half of these stable MTAs were found in genes encoding different types of proteins associated with heat stress. CONCLUSIONS: We identified 500 significant MTAs in soft winter wheat under HT stress. We found several stable loci across environments and pleiotropic markers controlling physiological and agronomic traits. After further validation, these MTAs can be used in marker-assisted selection and breeding to develop varieties with high stability for grain yield under high temperature. SN - 1471-2164 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32312234/Genetic_dissection_of_heat_responsive_physiological_traits_to_improve_adaptation_and_increase_yield_potential_in_soft_winter_wheat_ L2 - https://bmcgenomics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12864-020-6717-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -