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Ileal and hindgut fermentation in the growing pig fed a human-type diet.
Br J Nutr. 2020 09 28; 124(6):567-576.BJ

Abstract

Dietary fibre fermentation in humans and monogastric animals is considered to occur in the hindgut, but it may also occur in the lower small intestine. This study aimed to compare ileal and hindgut fermentation in the growing pig fed a human-type diet using a combined in vivo/in vitro methodology. Five pigs (23 (sd 1·6) kg body weight) were fed a human-type diet. On day 15, pigs were euthanised. Digesta from terminal jejunum and terminal ileum were collected as substrates for fermentation. Ileal and caecal digesta were collected for preparing microbial inocula. Terminal jejunal digesta were fermented in vitro with a pooled ileal digesta inoculum for 2 h, whereas terminal ileal digesta were fermented in vitro with a pooled caecal digesta inoculum for 24 h. The ileal organic matter fermentability (28 %) was not different from hindgut fermentation (35 %). However, the organic matter fermented was 66 % greater for ileal fermentation than hindgut fermentation (P = 0·04). Total numbers of bacteria in ileal and caecal digesta did not differ (P = 0·09). Differences (P < 0·05) were observed in the taxonomic composition. For instance, ileal digesta contained 32-fold greater number of the genus Enterococcus, whereas caecal digesta had a 227-fold greater number of the genus Ruminococcus. Acetate synthesis and iso-valerate synthesis were greater (P < 0·05) for ileal fermentation than hindgut fermentation, but propionate, butyrate and valerate synthesis was lower. SCFA were absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract location where they were synthesised. In conclusion, a quantitatively important degree of fermentation occurs in the ileum of the growing pig fed a human-type diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Food and Advanced Technology, Massey University, Palmerston North4442, New Zealand. Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North4442, New Zealand.Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North4442, New Zealand.Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North4442, New Zealand.The New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited, Palmerston North4442, New Zealand.Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North4442, New Zealand.Riddet Institute, Massey University, Palmerston North4442, New Zealand. Grasslands Research Centre, AgResearch Limited, Palmerston North4442, New Zealand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32312334

Citation

Hoogeveen, Anna M E., et al. "Ileal and Hindgut Fermentation in the Growing Pig Fed a Human-type Diet." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 124, no. 6, 2020, pp. 567-576.
Hoogeveen AME, Moughan PJ, de Haas ES, et al. Ileal and hindgut fermentation in the growing pig fed a human-type diet. Br J Nutr. 2020;124(6):567-576.
Hoogeveen, A. M. E., Moughan, P. J., de Haas, E. S., Blatchford, P., McNabb, W. C., & Montoya, C. A. (2020). Ileal and hindgut fermentation in the growing pig fed a human-type diet. The British Journal of Nutrition, 124(6), 567-576. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114520001385
Hoogeveen AME, et al. Ileal and Hindgut Fermentation in the Growing Pig Fed a Human-type Diet. Br J Nutr. 2020 09 28;124(6):567-576. PubMed PMID: 32312334.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ileal and hindgut fermentation in the growing pig fed a human-type diet. AU - Hoogeveen,Anna M E, AU - Moughan,Paul J, AU - de Haas,Edward S, AU - Blatchford,Paul, AU - McNabb,Warren C, AU - Montoya,Carlos A, Y1 - 2020/04/21/ PY - 2020/4/22/pubmed PY - 2020/11/11/medline PY - 2020/4/22/entrez KW - Hindgut fermentation KW - Human-type diets KW - Ileal fermentation KW - Microbiota KW - Pig models KW - SCFA SP - 567 EP - 576 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 124 IS - 6 N2 - Dietary fibre fermentation in humans and monogastric animals is considered to occur in the hindgut, but it may also occur in the lower small intestine. This study aimed to compare ileal and hindgut fermentation in the growing pig fed a human-type diet using a combined in vivo/in vitro methodology. Five pigs (23 (sd 1·6) kg body weight) were fed a human-type diet. On day 15, pigs were euthanised. Digesta from terminal jejunum and terminal ileum were collected as substrates for fermentation. Ileal and caecal digesta were collected for preparing microbial inocula. Terminal jejunal digesta were fermented in vitro with a pooled ileal digesta inoculum for 2 h, whereas terminal ileal digesta were fermented in vitro with a pooled caecal digesta inoculum for 24 h. The ileal organic matter fermentability (28 %) was not different from hindgut fermentation (35 %). However, the organic matter fermented was 66 % greater for ileal fermentation than hindgut fermentation (P = 0·04). Total numbers of bacteria in ileal and caecal digesta did not differ (P = 0·09). Differences (P < 0·05) were observed in the taxonomic composition. For instance, ileal digesta contained 32-fold greater number of the genus Enterococcus, whereas caecal digesta had a 227-fold greater number of the genus Ruminococcus. Acetate synthesis and iso-valerate synthesis were greater (P < 0·05) for ileal fermentation than hindgut fermentation, but propionate, butyrate and valerate synthesis was lower. SCFA were absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract location where they were synthesised. In conclusion, a quantitatively important degree of fermentation occurs in the ileum of the growing pig fed a human-type diet. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32312334/Ileal_and_hindgut_fermentation_in_the_growing_pig_fed_a_human_type_diet_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114520001385/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -