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Prevalence and cutaneous comorbidities of hidradenitis suppurativa in the German working population.
Arch Dermatol Res. 2020 Apr 22 [Online ahead of print]AD

Abstract

The association of hidradenitis suppurativa with other skin diseases has not yet been investigated in larger studies based on dermatological exams. The objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence and cutaneous comorbidities of hidradenitis suppurativa in the German working population. Between 2014 and 2017, 20,112 people in 343 German companies were examined for the presence of clinical features of hidradenitis suppurativa within the framework of a cross-sectional epidemiological study based on whole-body examinations. In addition, all cutaneous comorbidities were recorded. Point prevalence was calculated and the differences between individuals with and without hidradenitis suppurativa were determined by bivariate analysis. All statistical procedures were performed using SPSS 23.0 for Windows. Of 20,112 people examined, mean age was 43.6 ± 10.5 years; 52.3% were male. In total, n = 57 people (0.3%) with hidradenitis suppurativa were identified; 61.4% (n = 35) being male. In addition, non-inflammatory hidradenitis suppurativa-related lesions were found in 674 other individuals. In a bivariate comparison, patients with hidradenitis suppurativa showed significantly more frequently the following cutaneous comorbidities: acne vulgaris, psoriasis, seborrhoeic dermatitis, excoriations, and folliculitis. We determined a point prevalence of hidradenitis suppurativa of 0.3%. Since we have examined the working population, the healthy worker effect, which could have led to underestimation of prevalence, cannot be ruled out. The point prevalence of 0.3% for employed people in Germany and a prevalence of 3.0% for inflammatory and non-inflammatory hidradenitis suppurativa-related lesions show that hidradenitis suppurativa is an important disease for the whole health system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Health Services Research in Dermatology and Nursing (IVDP), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Martinistraβe 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. n.kirsten@uke.de.Institute for Health Services Research in Dermatology and Nursing (IVDP), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Martinistraβe 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany.Institute for Health Services Research in Dermatology and Nursing (IVDP), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Martinistraβe 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32322958

Citation

Kirsten, Natalia, et al. "Prevalence and Cutaneous Comorbidities of Hidradenitis Suppurativa in the German Working Population." Archives of Dermatological Research, 2020.
Kirsten N, Zander N, Augustin M. Prevalence and cutaneous comorbidities of hidradenitis suppurativa in the German working population. Arch Dermatol Res. 2020.
Kirsten, N., Zander, N., & Augustin, M. (2020). Prevalence and cutaneous comorbidities of hidradenitis suppurativa in the German working population. Archives of Dermatological Research. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00403-020-02065-2
Kirsten N, Zander N, Augustin M. Prevalence and Cutaneous Comorbidities of Hidradenitis Suppurativa in the German Working Population. Arch Dermatol Res. 2020 Apr 22; PubMed PMID: 32322958.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and cutaneous comorbidities of hidradenitis suppurativa in the German working population. AU - Kirsten,Natalia, AU - Zander,Nicole, AU - Augustin,Matthias, Y1 - 2020/04/22/ PY - 2019/11/19/received PY - 2020/03/28/accepted PY - 2020/03/03/revised PY - 2020/4/24/entrez KW - Atopy KW - Comorbidity KW - Epidemiology KW - Health care KW - Psoriasis JF - Archives of dermatological research JO - Arch. Dermatol. Res. N2 - The association of hidradenitis suppurativa with other skin diseases has not yet been investigated in larger studies based on dermatological exams. The objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence and cutaneous comorbidities of hidradenitis suppurativa in the German working population. Between 2014 and 2017, 20,112 people in 343 German companies were examined for the presence of clinical features of hidradenitis suppurativa within the framework of a cross-sectional epidemiological study based on whole-body examinations. In addition, all cutaneous comorbidities were recorded. Point prevalence was calculated and the differences between individuals with and without hidradenitis suppurativa were determined by bivariate analysis. All statistical procedures were performed using SPSS 23.0 for Windows. Of 20,112 people examined, mean age was 43.6 ± 10.5 years; 52.3% were male. In total, n = 57 people (0.3%) with hidradenitis suppurativa were identified; 61.4% (n = 35) being male. In addition, non-inflammatory hidradenitis suppurativa-related lesions were found in 674 other individuals. In a bivariate comparison, patients with hidradenitis suppurativa showed significantly more frequently the following cutaneous comorbidities: acne vulgaris, psoriasis, seborrhoeic dermatitis, excoriations, and folliculitis. We determined a point prevalence of hidradenitis suppurativa of 0.3%. Since we have examined the working population, the healthy worker effect, which could have led to underestimation of prevalence, cannot be ruled out. The point prevalence of 0.3% for employed people in Germany and a prevalence of 3.0% for inflammatory and non-inflammatory hidradenitis suppurativa-related lesions show that hidradenitis suppurativa is an important disease for the whole health system. SN - 1432-069X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32322958/Prevalence_and_cutaneous_comorbidities_of_hidradenitis_suppurativa_in_the_German_working_population L2 - https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00403-020-02065-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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