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Physiological stress response of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata exposed to polyethylene microplastics.
Environ Pollut. 2020 Aug; 263(Pt A):114559.EP

Abstract

We investigated physiological responses including calcification, photosynthesis and alterations to polar metabolites, in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata exposed to different concentrations of polyethylene microplastics. Results showed that at high plastic concentrations (50 particles/mL nominal concentration) the photosynthetic efficiency of photosystem II in the coral symbiont was affected after 4 weeks of exposure. Both moderate and high (5 and 50 particles/mL nominal) concentrations of microplastics caused subtle but significant alterations to metabolite profiles of coral, as determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Specifically, exposed corals were found to have increased levels of phosphorylated sugars and pyrimidine nucleobases that make up nucleotides, scyllo-inositol and a region containing overlapping proline and glutamate signals, compared to control animals. Together with the photo-physiological stress response observed and previously published literature, these findings support the hypothesis that microplastics disrupt host-symbiont signaling and that corals respond to this interference by increasing signaling and chemical support to the symbiotic zooxanthellae algae. These findings are also consistent with increased mucus production in corals exposed to microplastics described in previous studies. Considering the importance of coral reefs to marine ecosystems and their sensitivity to anthropogenic stressors, more research is needed to elucidate coral response mechanisms to microplastics under realistic exposure conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, 4a, Quai Antoine Ier, 98000, Monaco; Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Southport, QLD, 4215, Australia. Electronic address: c.lanctot@griffith.edu.au.CSM - Centre Scientifique de Monaco, Equipe Ecophysiologie corallienne, 8 Quai Antoine 1er, 98000, Monaco. Electronic address: vbednarz@centrescientifique.mc.Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University, Southport, QLD, 4215, Australia. Electronic address: s.melvin@griffith.edu.au.Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, 4a, Quai Antoine Ier, 98000, Monaco. Electronic address: h.jacob@iaea.org.Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, 4a, Quai Antoine Ier, 98000, Monaco. Electronic address: f.r.oberhaensli@iaea.org.Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, 4a, Quai Antoine Ier, 98000, Monaco. Electronic address: p.swarzenski@iaea.org.CSM - Centre Scientifique de Monaco, Equipe Ecophysiologie corallienne, 8 Quai Antoine 1er, 98000, Monaco. Electronic address: ferrier@centrescientifique.mc.Environmental Futures Research Institute, School of Environment and Science, Griffith University, Southport, QLD, 4222, Australia; Griffith Institute for Drug Discovery, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, 4111, Australia. Electronic address: a.carroll@griffith.edu.au.Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, 4a, Quai Antoine Ier, 98000, Monaco. Electronic address: m.metian@iaea.org.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32325355

Citation

Lanctôt, Chantal M., et al. "Physiological Stress Response of the Scleractinian Coral Stylophora Pistillata Exposed to Polyethylene Microplastics." Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), vol. 263, no. Pt A, 2020, p. 114559.
Lanctôt CM, Bednarz VN, Melvin S, et al. Physiological stress response of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata exposed to polyethylene microplastics. Environ Pollut. 2020;263(Pt A):114559.
Lanctôt, C. M., Bednarz, V. N., Melvin, S., Jacob, H., Oberhaensli, F., Swarzenski, P. W., Ferrier-Pagès, C., Carroll, A. R., & Metian, M. (2020). Physiological stress response of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata exposed to polyethylene microplastics. Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), 263(Pt A), 114559. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2020.114559
Lanctôt CM, et al. Physiological Stress Response of the Scleractinian Coral Stylophora Pistillata Exposed to Polyethylene Microplastics. Environ Pollut. 2020;263(Pt A):114559. PubMed PMID: 32325355.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physiological stress response of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata exposed to polyethylene microplastics. AU - Lanctôt,Chantal M, AU - Bednarz,Vanessa N, AU - Melvin,Steven, AU - Jacob,Hugo, AU - Oberhaensli,François, AU - Swarzenski,Peter W, AU - Ferrier-Pagès,Christine, AU - Carroll,Anthony R, AU - Metian,Marc, Y1 - 2020/04/12/ PY - 2019/11/12/received PY - 2020/03/30/revised PY - 2020/04/06/accepted PY - 2020/4/24/pubmed PY - 2020/7/11/medline PY - 2020/4/24/entrez KW - Calcification KW - Coral KW - Metabolomics KW - Microplastic KW - Photosynthetic activity SP - 114559 EP - 114559 JF - Environmental pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) JO - Environ. Pollut. VL - 263 IS - Pt A N2 - We investigated physiological responses including calcification, photosynthesis and alterations to polar metabolites, in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata exposed to different concentrations of polyethylene microplastics. Results showed that at high plastic concentrations (50 particles/mL nominal concentration) the photosynthetic efficiency of photosystem II in the coral symbiont was affected after 4 weeks of exposure. Both moderate and high (5 and 50 particles/mL nominal) concentrations of microplastics caused subtle but significant alterations to metabolite profiles of coral, as determined by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Specifically, exposed corals were found to have increased levels of phosphorylated sugars and pyrimidine nucleobases that make up nucleotides, scyllo-inositol and a region containing overlapping proline and glutamate signals, compared to control animals. Together with the photo-physiological stress response observed and previously published literature, these findings support the hypothesis that microplastics disrupt host-symbiont signaling and that corals respond to this interference by increasing signaling and chemical support to the symbiotic zooxanthellae algae. These findings are also consistent with increased mucus production in corals exposed to microplastics described in previous studies. Considering the importance of coral reefs to marine ecosystems and their sensitivity to anthropogenic stressors, more research is needed to elucidate coral response mechanisms to microplastics under realistic exposure conditions. SN - 1873-6424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32325355/Physiological_stress_response_of_the_scleractinian_coral_Stylophora_pistillata_exposed_to_polyethylene_microplastics_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0269-7491(19)36710-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -