Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics for the improvement of metabolic profiles in patients with chronic kidney disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2021; 61(4):577-598.CR

Abstract

This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to quantify the effects of probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic supplementation on biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as lipid profiles among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Electronic databases, including PubMed, the Cochrane Database, and the Web of Science were searched from January 1, 2000, to May 15, 2019. All RCTs that investigated the effect of prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics on a circulating (serum and plasma) inflammatory marker (C-reactive protein [CRP]), oxidative stress indicators (malondialdehyde [MDA], glutathione [GSH], and total anti-oxidant capacity [TAC]); and lipid profiles (total cholesterol [TC], triglycerides [TG], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-c], and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c]) among patients with CKD were included. Data were pooled and expressed as a standardized mean difference (SMD) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). The protocol for this meta-analysis is registered with PROSPERO; No. CRD42019139090. Thirteen trials that included 671 patients were identified for analysis. The methodological quality varied across studies. Meta-analysis indicated that microbial therapies significantly reduced CRP (SMD, -0.75; 95% CI, -1.03 to -0.47; p = 0.000), MDA (SMD, -1.06; 95% CI, -1.59 to -0.52; p = 0.000), TC (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.52 to -0.13; p = 0.000), and LDL-c (SMD, -0.44; 95% CI, -0.86 to -0.02; p = 0.000) levels; they also increased the GSH (SMD, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.65; p = 0.000), TAC (SMD, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.07 to 1.15; p = 0.000), and HDL-c (SMD, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.87; p = 0.000) levels in CKD patients, as compared to the placebo groups; however, there was no statistically significant TG concentration among patients with CKD. Subgroup analyses showed that other key factors, such as the duration of intervention, participants' baseline body mass index (BMI), type of intervention, and age, had an effect of microbial therapies on outcomes. This meta-analysis supports the potential use of probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic supplements in the improvement of established biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as lipid profiles among patients with CKD, which are well-known cardiovascular risk factors. Further research into these interventions should consider the limitations of our study to explore the effect of long-term administration of these supplements in the CKD population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Renal Research Institution of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, and Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education and Beijing, Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.Renal Research Institution of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, and Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education and Beijing, Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.Department of Endocrinology, Guang'anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.The Community Health Service Center of Wangzuo in Fengtai District, Beijing, China.Renal Research Institution of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, and Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education and Beijing, Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.Renal Research Institution of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, and Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education and Beijing, Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.Renal Research Institution of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, and Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education and Beijing, Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.Renal Research Institution of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, and Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education and Beijing, Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.Renal Research Institution of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, and Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education and Beijing, Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.Renal Research Institution of Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, and Key Laboratory of Chinese Internal Medicine of Ministry of Education and Beijing, Dongzhimen Hospital Affiliated to Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32329633

Citation

Zheng, Hui Juan, et al. "Probiotics, Prebiotics, and Synbiotics for the Improvement of Metabolic Profiles in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials." Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, vol. 61, no. 4, 2021, pp. 577-598.
Zheng HJ, Guo J, Wang Q, et al. Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics for the improvement of metabolic profiles in patients with chronic kidney disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2021;61(4):577-598.
Zheng, H. J., Guo, J., Wang, Q., Wang, L., Wang, Y., Zhang, F., Huang, W. J., Zhang, W., Liu, W. J., & Wang, Y. (2021). Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics for the improvement of metabolic profiles in patients with chronic kidney disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 61(4), 577-598. https://doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2020.1740645
Zheng HJ, et al. Probiotics, Prebiotics, and Synbiotics for the Improvement of Metabolic Profiles in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2021;61(4):577-598. PubMed PMID: 32329633.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics for the improvement of metabolic profiles in patients with chronic kidney disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. AU - Zheng,Hui Juan, AU - Guo,Jing, AU - Wang,Qiuhong, AU - Wang,Liansheng, AU - Wang,Yahui, AU - Zhang,Fan, AU - Huang,Wei-Jun, AU - Zhang,Wenting, AU - Liu,Wei Jing, AU - Wang,Yaoxian, Y1 - 2020/04/24/ PY - 2020/4/25/pubmed PY - 2021/1/16/medline PY - 2020/4/25/entrez KW - Chronic kidney disease KW - inflammation KW - lipid profile KW - meta-analysis KW - oxidative stress KW - prebiotic KW - probiotic KW - randomized controlled trials KW - synbiotic SP - 577 EP - 598 JF - Critical reviews in food science and nutrition JO - Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr VL - 61 IS - 4 N2 - This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to quantify the effects of probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic supplementation on biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as lipid profiles among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Electronic databases, including PubMed, the Cochrane Database, and the Web of Science were searched from January 1, 2000, to May 15, 2019. All RCTs that investigated the effect of prebiotics, probiotics, and synbiotics on a circulating (serum and plasma) inflammatory marker (C-reactive protein [CRP]), oxidative stress indicators (malondialdehyde [MDA], glutathione [GSH], and total anti-oxidant capacity [TAC]); and lipid profiles (total cholesterol [TC], triglycerides [TG], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-c], and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c]) among patients with CKD were included. Data were pooled and expressed as a standardized mean difference (SMD) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). The protocol for this meta-analysis is registered with PROSPERO; No. CRD42019139090. Thirteen trials that included 671 patients were identified for analysis. The methodological quality varied across studies. Meta-analysis indicated that microbial therapies significantly reduced CRP (SMD, -0.75; 95% CI, -1.03 to -0.47; p = 0.000), MDA (SMD, -1.06; 95% CI, -1.59 to -0.52; p = 0.000), TC (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.52 to -0.13; p = 0.000), and LDL-c (SMD, -0.44; 95% CI, -0.86 to -0.02; p = 0.000) levels; they also increased the GSH (SMD, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.65; p = 0.000), TAC (SMD, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.07 to 1.15; p = 0.000), and HDL-c (SMD, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.87; p = 0.000) levels in CKD patients, as compared to the placebo groups; however, there was no statistically significant TG concentration among patients with CKD. Subgroup analyses showed that other key factors, such as the duration of intervention, participants' baseline body mass index (BMI), type of intervention, and age, had an effect of microbial therapies on outcomes. This meta-analysis supports the potential use of probiotic, prebiotic, and synbiotic supplements in the improvement of established biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, as well as lipid profiles among patients with CKD, which are well-known cardiovascular risk factors. Further research into these interventions should consider the limitations of our study to explore the effect of long-term administration of these supplements in the CKD population. SN - 1549-7852 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32329633/Probiotics_prebiotics_and_synbiotics_for_the_improvement_of_metabolic_profiles_in_patients_with_chronic_kidney_disease:_A_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_of_randomized_controlled_trials_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -