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Acute Psychological Effects of Resistance Exercise in Men With Symptoms of Muscle Dysmorphia: A Pilot Study.
J Strength Cond Res. 2020 Apr 23 [Online ahead of print]JS

Abstract

SantaBarbara, NJ, Nosrat, S, Whitworth, JW, Ciccolo, JT. acute psychological effects of resistance exercise in men with symptoms of muscle dysmorphia: A pilot study. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2020-This study tested the acute psychological effects of resistance exercise in men with symptoms of muscle dysmorphia. Twenty-one men completed 4 on-site sessions including a single session of moderate- (70% of 10 repetition maximum [RM]) and high- (100% of 10RM) intensity resistance exercise in a counter balanced order separated by at least 48 hours. State body image, perceived muscle size, exercise enjoyment, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed before, during, and after each session, and statistical significance was set a priori at p < 0.05. State body image significantly improve from pre to post during both sessions (p < 0.01), with greater effect sizes seen for the high- (d = 0.57) compared with the moderate- (d = 0.39) intensity session. Perceived muscle size improved from pre to post during the high-intensity only (p < 0.01, d = 0.66), and subjects enjoyed the high-intensity session significantly more than the moderate-intensity session (p = 0.01), despite significantly higher RPE at each timepoint (p < 0.01). Results contend with previous findings that show more positive psychological effects of moderate- compared with high-intensity resistance exercise. Education and client observation are essential to be aware of the potential for muscle dysmorphia. In instances where muscle dysmorphia is suspected, referral to qualified mental health professionals is recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Los Angeles, California.Department of Biobehavioral Sciences, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, New York.Department of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Biobehavioral Sciences, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, New York.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32332260

Citation

SantaBarbara, Nicholas J., et al. "Acute Psychological Effects of Resistance Exercise in Men With Symptoms of Muscle Dysmorphia: a Pilot Study." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 2020.
SantaBarbara NJ, Nosrat S, Whitworth JW, et al. Acute Psychological Effects of Resistance Exercise in Men With Symptoms of Muscle Dysmorphia: A Pilot Study. J Strength Cond Res. 2020.
SantaBarbara, N. J., Nosrat, S., Whitworth, J. W., & Ciccolo, J. T. (2020). Acute Psychological Effects of Resistance Exercise in Men With Symptoms of Muscle Dysmorphia: A Pilot Study. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003615
SantaBarbara NJ, et al. Acute Psychological Effects of Resistance Exercise in Men With Symptoms of Muscle Dysmorphia: a Pilot Study. J Strength Cond Res. 2020 Apr 23; PubMed PMID: 32332260.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute Psychological Effects of Resistance Exercise in Men With Symptoms of Muscle Dysmorphia: A Pilot Study. AU - SantaBarbara,Nicholas J, AU - Nosrat,Sanaz, AU - Whitworth,James W, AU - Ciccolo,Joseph T, Y1 - 2020/04/23/ PY - 2020/4/26/entrez JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res N2 - SantaBarbara, NJ, Nosrat, S, Whitworth, JW, Ciccolo, JT. acute psychological effects of resistance exercise in men with symptoms of muscle dysmorphia: A pilot study. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2020-This study tested the acute psychological effects of resistance exercise in men with symptoms of muscle dysmorphia. Twenty-one men completed 4 on-site sessions including a single session of moderate- (70% of 10 repetition maximum [RM]) and high- (100% of 10RM) intensity resistance exercise in a counter balanced order separated by at least 48 hours. State body image, perceived muscle size, exercise enjoyment, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed before, during, and after each session, and statistical significance was set a priori at p < 0.05. State body image significantly improve from pre to post during both sessions (p < 0.01), with greater effect sizes seen for the high- (d = 0.57) compared with the moderate- (d = 0.39) intensity session. Perceived muscle size improved from pre to post during the high-intensity only (p < 0.01, d = 0.66), and subjects enjoyed the high-intensity session significantly more than the moderate-intensity session (p = 0.01), despite significantly higher RPE at each timepoint (p < 0.01). Results contend with previous findings that show more positive psychological effects of moderate- compared with high-intensity resistance exercise. Education and client observation are essential to be aware of the potential for muscle dysmorphia. In instances where muscle dysmorphia is suspected, referral to qualified mental health professionals is recommended. SN - 1533-4287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32332260/Acute_Psychological_Effects_of_Resistance_Exercise_in_Men_With_Symptoms_of_Muscle_Dysmorphia:_A_Pilot_Study L2 - https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000003615 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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