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Role of Cannabis and Its Derivatives in Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Disease.
Gastroenterology. 2020 07; 159(1):62-80.G

Abstract

Medical and recreational cannabis use has increased dramatically over the last decade, resulting from mainstream cultural acceptance and legalization in several countries worldwide. Cannabis and its derivatives affect many gastrointestinal processes via the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The ECS influences gastrointestinal homeostasis through anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive, and anti-secretory effects. Some gastrointestinal disorders might therefore be treated with cannabinoids. Despite numerous studies in cell lines and animals, few human studies have evaluated the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids. Cannabis' schedule 1 drug status has limited its availability in research; cannabis has been legalized only recently, in some states, for medicinal and/or recreational use. Cannabinoids can alleviate chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis and chronic pain. Studies have demonstrated the important roles of the ECS in metabolism, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabis have been investigated in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Despite its potential benefits, undesired or even detrimental effects of cannabis can limit its use. Side effects such as cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome affect some users. We review the ECS and the effects of cannabis and its derivatives on gastrointestinal and hepatic function in health and disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Meir Medical Center, affiliated with the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.Division of Gastroenterology/Hepatology Department of Internal Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida. Electronic address: Ron.Schey@jax.ufl.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32333910

Citation

Gotfried, Jonathan, et al. "Role of Cannabis and Its Derivatives in Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Disease." Gastroenterology, vol. 159, no. 1, 2020, pp. 62-80.
Gotfried J, Naftali T, Schey R. Role of Cannabis and Its Derivatives in Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Disease. Gastroenterology. 2020;159(1):62-80.
Gotfried, J., Naftali, T., & Schey, R. (2020). Role of Cannabis and Its Derivatives in Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Disease. Gastroenterology, 159(1), 62-80. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2020.03.087
Gotfried J, Naftali T, Schey R. Role of Cannabis and Its Derivatives in Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Disease. Gastroenterology. 2020;159(1):62-80. PubMed PMID: 32333910.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of Cannabis and Its Derivatives in Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Disease. AU - Gotfried,Jonathan, AU - Naftali,Timna, AU - Schey,Ron, Y1 - 2020/04/22/ PY - 2019/08/08/received PY - 2020/03/26/revised PY - 2020/03/29/accepted PY - 2020/4/26/pubmed PY - 2021/4/1/medline PY - 2020/4/26/entrez KW - CHS KW - NAFLD KW - THC KW - drug SP - 62 EP - 80 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 159 IS - 1 N2 - Medical and recreational cannabis use has increased dramatically over the last decade, resulting from mainstream cultural acceptance and legalization in several countries worldwide. Cannabis and its derivatives affect many gastrointestinal processes via the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The ECS influences gastrointestinal homeostasis through anti-inflammatory, anti-nociceptive, and anti-secretory effects. Some gastrointestinal disorders might therefore be treated with cannabinoids. Despite numerous studies in cell lines and animals, few human studies have evaluated the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids. Cannabis' schedule 1 drug status has limited its availability in research; cannabis has been legalized only recently, in some states, for medicinal and/or recreational use. Cannabinoids can alleviate chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis and chronic pain. Studies have demonstrated the important roles of the ECS in metabolism, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabis have been investigated in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. Despite its potential benefits, undesired or even detrimental effects of cannabis can limit its use. Side effects such as cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome affect some users. We review the ECS and the effects of cannabis and its derivatives on gastrointestinal and hepatic function in health and disease. SN - 1528-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32333910/Role_of_Cannabis_and_Its_Derivatives_in_Gastrointestinal_and_Hepatic_Disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(20)30563-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -