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Molecular components affecting ocular carotenoid and retinoid homeostasis.
Prog Retin Eye Res. 2020 Apr 25 [Online ahead of print]PR

Abstract

The photochemistry of vision employs opsins and geometric isomerization of their covalently bound retinylidine chromophores. In different animal classes, these light receptors associate with distinct G proteins that either hyperpolarize or depolarize photoreceptor membranes. Vertebrates also use the acidic form of chromophore, retinoic acid, as the ligand of nuclear hormone receptors that orchestrate eye development. To establish and sustain these processes, animals must acquire carotenoids from the diet, transport them, and metabolize them to chromophore and retinoic acid. The understanding of carotenoid metabolism, however, lagged behind our knowledge about the biology of their receptor molecules. In the past decades, much progress has been made in identifying the genes encoding proteins that mediate the transport and enzymatic transformations of carotenoids and their retinoid metabolites. Comparative analysis in different animal classes revealed how evolutionary tinkering with a limited number of genes evolved different biochemical strategies to supply photoreceptors with chromophore. Mutations in these genes impair carotenoid metabolism and induce various ocular pathologies. This review summarizes this advancement and introduces the involved proteins, including the homeostatic regulation of their activities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. Electronic address: johannes.vonlintig@case.edu.Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32339666

Citation

von Lintig, Johannes, et al. "Molecular Components Affecting Ocular Carotenoid and Retinoid Homeostasis." Progress in Retinal and Eye Research, 2020, p. 100864.
von Lintig J, Moon J, Babino D. Molecular components affecting ocular carotenoid and retinoid homeostasis. Prog Retin Eye Res. 2020.
von Lintig, J., Moon, J., & Babino, D. (2020). Molecular components affecting ocular carotenoid and retinoid homeostasis. Progress in Retinal and Eye Research, 100864. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.preteyeres.2020.100864
von Lintig J, Moon J, Babino D. Molecular Components Affecting Ocular Carotenoid and Retinoid Homeostasis. Prog Retin Eye Res. 2020 Apr 25;100864. PubMed PMID: 32339666.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Molecular components affecting ocular carotenoid and retinoid homeostasis. AU - von Lintig,Johannes, AU - Moon,Jean, AU - Babino,Darwin, Y1 - 2020/04/25/ PY - 2020/02/25/received PY - 2020/04/13/revised PY - 2020/04/17/accepted PY - 2020/4/28/pubmed PY - 2020/4/28/medline PY - 2020/4/28/entrez KW - BCO1 KW - BCO2 KW - Carotenoids KW - RPE65 KW - Retinoids KW - SR-B1 KW - STRA6 SP - 100864 EP - 100864 JF - Progress in retinal and eye research JO - Prog Retin Eye Res N2 - The photochemistry of vision employs opsins and geometric isomerization of their covalently bound retinylidine chromophores. In different animal classes, these light receptors associate with distinct G proteins that either hyperpolarize or depolarize photoreceptor membranes. Vertebrates also use the acidic form of chromophore, retinoic acid, as the ligand of nuclear hormone receptors that orchestrate eye development. To establish and sustain these processes, animals must acquire carotenoids from the diet, transport them, and metabolize them to chromophore and retinoic acid. The understanding of carotenoid metabolism, however, lagged behind our knowledge about the biology of their receptor molecules. In the past decades, much progress has been made in identifying the genes encoding proteins that mediate the transport and enzymatic transformations of carotenoids and their retinoid metabolites. Comparative analysis in different animal classes revealed how evolutionary tinkering with a limited number of genes evolved different biochemical strategies to supply photoreceptors with chromophore. Mutations in these genes impair carotenoid metabolism and induce various ocular pathologies. This review summarizes this advancement and introduces the involved proteins, including the homeostatic regulation of their activities. SN - 1873-1635 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32339666/Molecular_components_affecting_ocular_carotenoid_and_retinoid_homeostasis L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1350-9462(20)30036-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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