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Chronic cough in Vocal Cord Dysfunction: Description of a clinical entity.
Respir Med. 2020 07; 168:105990.RM

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIM

Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD) and chronic cough (CC) are challenging conditions which lead to significant quality of life impairment. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, but laryngeal dysfunction may be common to both conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of cough in VCD and whether patients with cough have coexisting VCD.

METHOD

Participants included 51 patients with VCD and a comparison group of 39 patients with chronic cough that was refractory to medical treatment. Participants underwent a comprehensive assessment including questionnaires, laryngoscopy, cough frequency monitoring and voice testing.

RESULTS

Patients with VCD had significant cough morbidity with an increased cough frequency of 17.3 coughs/hour and reduced cough quality of life with mean Leicester Cough Questionnaire Score of 12.8. Breathing pattern abnormalities were also common in VCD and there was a strong correlation between the number of breathing pattern abnormalities and cough frequency (r = -0.827, p = 0.002). Cough measures were not significantly different between patients with VCD and those with CC. Moderate-severe PVFM was present in 69% of patients with CC. Abnormal vocal fold closure during phonation was also present in patients with chronic cough and was similar between the VCD (n = 40, 78.4%) and cough (n = 25, 64.1%) groups, p = 0.240.

CONCLUSION

Cough is an important symptom in VCD. Patients presenting with chronic cough may have underlying VCD as a cause of their cough. Since cough and VCD symptoms co-occur clinicians need to consider cough when are treating VCD and VCD when treating chronic cough.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Speech Pathology Department John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, Australia; School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: anne.vertigan@health.nsw.gov.au.Speech Pathology Department John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs, Hunter Medical Research Institute, Newcastle, NSW, Australia; School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32364960

Citation

Vertigan, Anne E., et al. "Chronic Cough in Vocal Cord Dysfunction: Description of a Clinical Entity." Respiratory Medicine, vol. 168, 2020, p. 105990.
Vertigan AE, Kapela SL, Gibson PG. Chronic cough in Vocal Cord Dysfunction: Description of a clinical entity. Respir Med. 2020;168:105990.
Vertigan, A. E., Kapela, S. L., & Gibson, P. G. (2020). Chronic cough in Vocal Cord Dysfunction: Description of a clinical entity. Respiratory Medicine, 168, 105990. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2020.105990
Vertigan AE, Kapela SL, Gibson PG. Chronic Cough in Vocal Cord Dysfunction: Description of a Clinical Entity. Respir Med. 2020;168:105990. PubMed PMID: 32364960.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chronic cough in Vocal Cord Dysfunction: Description of a clinical entity. AU - Vertigan,Anne E, AU - Kapela,Sarah L, AU - Gibson,Peter G, Y1 - 2020/04/25/ PY - 2020/02/12/received PY - 2020/04/20/revised PY - 2020/04/21/accepted PY - 2020/5/5/pubmed PY - 2020/5/5/medline PY - 2020/5/5/entrez KW - Cough KW - Cough hypersensitivity syndrome KW - Inducible laryngeal obstruction KW - Laryngeal dysfunction KW - Vocal cord dysfunction SP - 105990 EP - 105990 JF - Respiratory medicine JO - Respir Med VL - 168 N2 - BACKGROUND AND AIM: Vocal Cord Dysfunction (VCD) and chronic cough (CC) are challenging conditions which lead to significant quality of life impairment. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, but laryngeal dysfunction may be common to both conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of cough in VCD and whether patients with cough have coexisting VCD. METHOD: Participants included 51 patients with VCD and a comparison group of 39 patients with chronic cough that was refractory to medical treatment. Participants underwent a comprehensive assessment including questionnaires, laryngoscopy, cough frequency monitoring and voice testing. RESULTS: Patients with VCD had significant cough morbidity with an increased cough frequency of 17.3 coughs/hour and reduced cough quality of life with mean Leicester Cough Questionnaire Score of 12.8. Breathing pattern abnormalities were also common in VCD and there was a strong correlation between the number of breathing pattern abnormalities and cough frequency (r = -0.827, p = 0.002). Cough measures were not significantly different between patients with VCD and those with CC. Moderate-severe PVFM was present in 69% of patients with CC. Abnormal vocal fold closure during phonation was also present in patients with chronic cough and was similar between the VCD (n = 40, 78.4%) and cough (n = 25, 64.1%) groups, p = 0.240. CONCLUSION: Cough is an important symptom in VCD. Patients presenting with chronic cough may have underlying VCD as a cause of their cough. Since cough and VCD symptoms co-occur clinicians need to consider cough when are treating VCD and VCD when treating chronic cough. SN - 1532-3064 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32364960/Chronic_cough_in_Vocal_Cord_Dysfunction:_Description_of_a_clinical_entity L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0954-6111(20)30130-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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