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Cutaneous Pseudolymphoma As a Rare Adverse Effect of Medicinal Leech Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.
Cureus. 2020 Apr 02; 12(4):e7517.C

Abstract

Hirudotherapy (leech therapy) is one of the oldest practices in medical history, and nowadays it is used for several purposes in medicine. Salvage of flaps, wound healing, pain management, and treatment of varicose veins are among the common therapeutic applications of leeches. Complications associated with leech therapy include infections, bleeding, anemia, and allergic reaction. Cutaneous pseudolymphoma (benign proliferation of lymphoid cells in the skin) follows several underlying conditions. Although persistent arthropod bite reaction is one of the conditions associated with cutaneous pseudolymphoma, it has been rarely reported after medicinal leech therapy. Here we describe the case of a patient who presented with cutaneous pseudolymphoma after leech therapy as a rare cutaneous complication of hirudotherapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Molecular Dermatology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IRN.Dermatology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IRN.Dermatology, Molecular Dermatology Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IRN.Pathology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, IRN.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32377465

Citation

Sepaskhah, Mozhdeh, et al. "Cutaneous Pseudolymphoma as a Rare Adverse Effect of Medicinal Leech Therapy: a Case Report and Review of the Literature." Cureus, vol. 12, no. 4, 2020, pp. e7517.
Sepaskhah M, Yazdanpanah N, Sari Aslani F, et al. Cutaneous Pseudolymphoma As a Rare Adverse Effect of Medicinal Leech Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. Cureus. 2020;12(4):e7517.
Sepaskhah, M., Yazdanpanah, N., Sari Aslani, F., & Akbarzadeh Jahromi, M. (2020). Cutaneous Pseudolymphoma As a Rare Adverse Effect of Medicinal Leech Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. Cureus, 12(4), e7517. https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.7517
Sepaskhah M, et al. Cutaneous Pseudolymphoma as a Rare Adverse Effect of Medicinal Leech Therapy: a Case Report and Review of the Literature. Cureus. 2020 Apr 2;12(4):e7517. PubMed PMID: 32377465.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cutaneous Pseudolymphoma As a Rare Adverse Effect of Medicinal Leech Therapy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. AU - Sepaskhah,Mozhdeh, AU - Yazdanpanah,Nazafarin, AU - Sari Aslani,Fatemeh, AU - Akbarzadeh Jahromi,Mojgan, Y1 - 2020/04/02/ PY - 2020/5/8/entrez PY - 2020/5/8/pubmed PY - 2020/5/8/medline KW - adverse effects KW - hirudo medicinalis KW - leeches KW - leeching KW - pseudolymphoma KW - reactive lymphoid hyperplasia KW - skin SP - e7517 EP - e7517 JF - Cureus JO - Cureus VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - Hirudotherapy (leech therapy) is one of the oldest practices in medical history, and nowadays it is used for several purposes in medicine. Salvage of flaps, wound healing, pain management, and treatment of varicose veins are among the common therapeutic applications of leeches. Complications associated with leech therapy include infections, bleeding, anemia, and allergic reaction. Cutaneous pseudolymphoma (benign proliferation of lymphoid cells in the skin) follows several underlying conditions. Although persistent arthropod bite reaction is one of the conditions associated with cutaneous pseudolymphoma, it has been rarely reported after medicinal leech therapy. Here we describe the case of a patient who presented with cutaneous pseudolymphoma after leech therapy as a rare cutaneous complication of hirudotherapy. SN - 2168-8184 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32377465/Cutaneous_Pseudolymphoma_As_a_Rare_Adverse_Effect_of_Medicinal_Leech_Therapy:_A_Case_Report_and_Review_of_the_Literature DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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