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Isolation of SARS-CoV-2-related coronavirus from Malayan pangolins.
Nature. 2020 07; 583(7815):286-289.Nat

Abstract

The current outbreak of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) poses unprecedented challenges to global health1. The new coronavirus responsible for this outbreak-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-shares high sequence identity to SARS-CoV and a bat coronavirus, RaTG132. Although bats may be the reservoir host for a variety of coronaviruses3,4, it remains unknown whether SARS-CoV-2 has additional host species. Here we show that a coronavirus, which we name pangolin-CoV, isolated from a Malayan pangolin has 100%, 98.6%, 97.8% and 90.7% amino acid identity with SARS-CoV-2 in the E, M, N and S proteins, respectively. In particular, the receptor-binding domain of the S protein of pangolin-CoV is almost identical to that of SARS-CoV-2, with one difference in a noncritical amino acid. Our comparative genomic analysis suggests that SARS-CoV-2 may have originated in the recombination of a virus similar to pangolin-CoV with one similar to RaTG13. Pangolin-CoV was detected in 17 out of the 25 Malayan pangolins that we analysed. Infected pangolins showed clinical signs and histological changes, and circulating antibodies against pangolin-CoV reacted with the S protein of SARS-CoV-2. The isolation of a coronavirus from pangolins that is closely related to SARS-CoV-2 suggests that these animals have the potential to act as an intermediate host of SARS-CoV-2. This newly identified coronavirus from pangolins-the most-trafficked mammal in the illegal wildlife trade-could represent a future threat to public health if wildlife trade is not effectively controlled.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou, China.Guangzhou Zoo & Guangzhou Wildlife Research Center, Guangzhou, China.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou, China.Guangzhou Zoo & Guangzhou Wildlife Research Center, Guangzhou, China.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou, China.Guangdong Provincial Wildlife Rescue Center, Guangzhou, China.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou, China.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou, China.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou, China.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou, China.State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China.State Key Laboratory of Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. Zhaoqing Branch Center of Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agricultural Science and Technology, Zhaoqing, China.Guangzhou Zoo & Guangzhou Wildlife Research Center, Guangzhou, China.Guangzhou Zoo & Guangzhou Wildlife Research Center, Guangzhou, China.Guangzhou Zoo & Guangzhou Wildlife Research Center, Guangzhou, China.Guangzhou Zoo & Guangzhou Wildlife Research Center, Guangzhou, China.Guangzhou Zoo & Guangzhou Wildlife Research Center, Guangzhou, China.Guangdong Provincial Wildlife Rescue Center, Guangzhou, China.Guangzhou Zoo & Guangzhou Wildlife Research Center, Guangzhou, China. guangzhouchenwu@sina.com.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. lxiao@scau.edu.cn. Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou, China. lxiao@scau.edu.cn.Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China. shenyy@scau.edu.cn. Guangdong Laboratory for Lingnan Modern Agriculture, Guangzhou, China. shenyy@scau.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32380510

Citation

Xiao, Kangpeng, et al. "Isolation of SARS-CoV-2-related Coronavirus From Malayan Pangolins." Nature, vol. 583, no. 7815, 2020, pp. 286-289.
Xiao K, Zhai J, Feng Y, et al. Isolation of SARS-CoV-2-related coronavirus from Malayan pangolins. Nature. 2020;583(7815):286-289.
Xiao, K., Zhai, J., Feng, Y., Zhou, N., Zhang, X., Zou, J. J., Li, N., Guo, Y., Li, X., Shen, X., Zhang, Z., Shu, F., Huang, W., Li, Y., Zhang, Z., Chen, R. A., Wu, Y. J., Peng, S. M., Huang, M., ... Shen, Y. (2020). Isolation of SARS-CoV-2-related coronavirus from Malayan pangolins. Nature, 583(7815), 286-289. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2313-x
Xiao K, et al. Isolation of SARS-CoV-2-related Coronavirus From Malayan Pangolins. Nature. 2020;583(7815):286-289. PubMed PMID: 32380510.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Isolation of SARS-CoV-2-related coronavirus from Malayan pangolins. AU - Xiao,Kangpeng, AU - Zhai,Junqiong, AU - Feng,Yaoyu, AU - Zhou,Niu, AU - Zhang,Xu, AU - Zou,Jie-Jian, AU - Li,Na, AU - Guo,Yaqiong, AU - Li,Xiaobing, AU - Shen,Xuejuan, AU - Zhang,Zhipeng, AU - Shu,Fanfan, AU - Huang,Wanyi, AU - Li,Yu, AU - Zhang,Ziding, AU - Chen,Rui-Ai, AU - Wu,Ya-Jiang, AU - Peng,Shi-Ming, AU - Huang,Mian, AU - Xie,Wei-Jun, AU - Cai,Qin-Hui, AU - Hou,Fang-Hui, AU - Chen,Wu, AU - Xiao,Lihua, AU - Shen,Yongyi, Y1 - 2020/05/07/ PY - 2020/02/16/received PY - 2020/04/28/accepted PY - 2020/5/8/pubmed PY - 2020/7/14/medline PY - 2020/5/8/entrez SP - 286 EP - 289 JF - Nature JO - Nature VL - 583 IS - 7815 N2 - The current outbreak of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) poses unprecedented challenges to global health1. The new coronavirus responsible for this outbreak-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-shares high sequence identity to SARS-CoV and a bat coronavirus, RaTG132. Although bats may be the reservoir host for a variety of coronaviruses3,4, it remains unknown whether SARS-CoV-2 has additional host species. Here we show that a coronavirus, which we name pangolin-CoV, isolated from a Malayan pangolin has 100%, 98.6%, 97.8% and 90.7% amino acid identity with SARS-CoV-2 in the E, M, N and S proteins, respectively. In particular, the receptor-binding domain of the S protein of pangolin-CoV is almost identical to that of SARS-CoV-2, with one difference in a noncritical amino acid. Our comparative genomic analysis suggests that SARS-CoV-2 may have originated in the recombination of a virus similar to pangolin-CoV with one similar to RaTG13. Pangolin-CoV was detected in 17 out of the 25 Malayan pangolins that we analysed. Infected pangolins showed clinical signs and histological changes, and circulating antibodies against pangolin-CoV reacted with the S protein of SARS-CoV-2. The isolation of a coronavirus from pangolins that is closely related to SARS-CoV-2 suggests that these animals have the potential to act as an intermediate host of SARS-CoV-2. This newly identified coronavirus from pangolins-the most-trafficked mammal in the illegal wildlife trade-could represent a future threat to public health if wildlife trade is not effectively controlled. SN - 1476-4687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32380510/Isolation_of_SARS_CoV_2_related_coronavirus_from_Malayan_pangolins_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2313-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -