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Prehabilitation for the Frailty Syndrome: Improving Outcomes for Our Most Vulnerable Patients.
Anesth Analg. 2020 06; 130(6):1524-1533.A&A

Abstract

Anesthetists are increasingly faced with the challenge of delivering perioperative care to frail older people. Patients with frailty undergoing surgical intervention are at a significantly increased risk of perioperative complications, mortality, and longer length of stay. Moreover, frailty is often associated with multimorbidity and a range of geriatric syndromes including functional dependency, cognitive impairment, and malnutrition which further increases risk and complexity of care. There is a growing body of evidence that prehabilitation-intervention delivered during the preoperative period to improve overall health and function-can improve postoperative outcomes for patients undergoing surgery. However, whether this vulnerable population stand to benefit from prehabilitation is less clear. We review the evidence for prehabilitation for patients with frailty including whether the risks associated with and outcomes from surgery can be modified through comprehensive geriatric assessment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Falls, Balance and Injury Research Centre, Neuroscience Research Australia, Randwick, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Department of Aged Care, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.From the Falls, Balance and Injury Research Centre, Neuroscience Research Australia, Randwick, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Department of Aged Care, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32384342

Citation

Norris, Christina M., and Jacqueline C T. Close. "Prehabilitation for the Frailty Syndrome: Improving Outcomes for Our Most Vulnerable Patients." Anesthesia and Analgesia, vol. 130, no. 6, 2020, pp. 1524-1533.
Norris CM, Close JCT. Prehabilitation for the Frailty Syndrome: Improving Outcomes for Our Most Vulnerable Patients. Anesth Analg. 2020;130(6):1524-1533.
Norris, C. M., & Close, J. C. T. (2020). Prehabilitation for the Frailty Syndrome: Improving Outcomes for Our Most Vulnerable Patients. Anesthesia and Analgesia, 130(6), 1524-1533. https://doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000004785
Norris CM, Close JCT. Prehabilitation for the Frailty Syndrome: Improving Outcomes for Our Most Vulnerable Patients. Anesth Analg. 2020;130(6):1524-1533. PubMed PMID: 32384342.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prehabilitation for the Frailty Syndrome: Improving Outcomes for Our Most Vulnerable Patients. AU - Norris,Christina M, AU - Close,Jacqueline C T, PY - 2020/5/9/entrez PY - 2020/5/10/pubmed PY - 2020/7/1/medline SP - 1524 EP - 1533 JF - Anesthesia and analgesia JO - Anesth Analg VL - 130 IS - 6 N2 - Anesthetists are increasingly faced with the challenge of delivering perioperative care to frail older people. Patients with frailty undergoing surgical intervention are at a significantly increased risk of perioperative complications, mortality, and longer length of stay. Moreover, frailty is often associated with multimorbidity and a range of geriatric syndromes including functional dependency, cognitive impairment, and malnutrition which further increases risk and complexity of care. There is a growing body of evidence that prehabilitation-intervention delivered during the preoperative period to improve overall health and function-can improve postoperative outcomes for patients undergoing surgery. However, whether this vulnerable population stand to benefit from prehabilitation is less clear. We review the evidence for prehabilitation for patients with frailty including whether the risks associated with and outcomes from surgery can be modified through comprehensive geriatric assessment. SN - 1526-7598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32384342/Prehabilitation_for_the_Frailty_Syndrome:_Improving_Outcomes_for_Our_Most_Vulnerable_Patients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000004785 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -