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Particulate Matter Decreases Intestinal Barrier-Associated Proteins Levels in 3D Human Intestinal Model.
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 05 06; 17(9)IJ

Abstract

(1)

Background:

The gastrointestinal tract (GI) tract is one of the main organs exposed to particulate matter (PM) directly through ingestion of contaminated food or indirectly through inhalation. Previous studies have investigated the effects of chronic PM exposure on intestinal epithelia in vitro using Caco-2 cells and in vivo using mice. In this study, we hypothesized that chronic PM exposure would increase epithelial permeability and decrease barrier function due to altered redox homeostasis, which alters levels and/or localization of barrier-associated proteins in human three-dimensional (3D) intestinal tissues. (2)

Methods:

Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in tissues exposed to 50, 100, 150, 250, and 500 µg/cm2 of PM for 1 week and 2 weeks was analyzed. Levels and localization of tight junction proteins zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and claudin-1 and desmosome-associated desmocollin were analyzed using immunofluorescence. As a marker of oxidative stress, levels of 4-hydroxy-nonenal (4HNE) adducts were measured. (3)

Results:

No differences in TEER measurements were observed between exposed and un-exposed tissues. However, increased levels of 4HNE adducts in exposed tissues were observed. Additionally, decreased levels of ZO-1, claudin-1, and desmocollin were demonstrated. (4)

Conclusion:

These data suggest that chronic PM exposure results in an increase of oxidative stress; modified levels of barrier-associated proteins could possibly link to GI tract inflammatory conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Plants for Human Health Institute, Animal Sciences Dept., NC Research Campus Kannapolis, State University, Kannapolis, NC 28081 USA.Plants for Human Health Institute, Animal Sciences Dept., NC Research Campus Kannapolis, State University, Kannapolis, NC 28081 USA.Plants for Human Health Institute, Animal Sciences Dept., NC Research Campus Kannapolis, State University, Kannapolis, NC 28081 USA.Pharmanex Research, NSE Products, Inc., Provo, UT 84601, USA.Pharmanex Research, NSE Products, Inc., Provo, UT 84601, USA.Pharmanex Research, NSE Products, Inc., Provo, UT 84601, USA.Plants for Human Health Institute, Animal Sciences Dept., NC Research Campus Kannapolis, State University, Kannapolis, NC 28081 USA.Plants for Human Health Institute, Animal Sciences Dept., NC Research Campus Kannapolis, State University, Kannapolis, NC 28081 USA. Department of Biomedical and Specialist Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32384765

Citation

Woodby, Brittany, et al. "Particulate Matter Decreases Intestinal Barrier-Associated Proteins Levels in 3D Human Intestinal Model." International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 17, no. 9, 2020.
Woodby B, Schiavone ML, Pambianchi E, et al. Particulate Matter Decreases Intestinal Barrier-Associated Proteins Levels in 3D Human Intestinal Model. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020;17(9).
Woodby, B., Schiavone, M. L., Pambianchi, E., Mastaloudis, A., N Hester, S., M Wood, S., Pecorelli, A., & Valacchi, G. (2020). Particulate Matter Decreases Intestinal Barrier-Associated Proteins Levels in 3D Human Intestinal Model. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(9). https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17093234
Woodby B, et al. Particulate Matter Decreases Intestinal Barrier-Associated Proteins Levels in 3D Human Intestinal Model. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2020 05 6;17(9) PubMed PMID: 32384765.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Particulate Matter Decreases Intestinal Barrier-Associated Proteins Levels in 3D Human Intestinal Model. AU - Woodby,Brittany, AU - Schiavone,Maria Lucia, AU - Pambianchi,Erika, AU - Mastaloudis,Angela, AU - N Hester,Shelly, AU - M Wood,Steven, AU - Pecorelli,Alessandra, AU - Valacchi,Giuseppe, Y1 - 2020/05/06/ PY - 2020/04/07/received PY - 2020/04/24/revised PY - 2020/05/03/accepted PY - 2020/5/10/entrez PY - 2020/5/10/pubmed PY - 2020/10/21/medline KW - 4HNE KW - ZO−1 KW - desmosome KW - pollution KW - tight junctions JF - International journal of environmental research and public health JO - Int J Environ Res Public Health VL - 17 IS - 9 N2 - (1) Background: The gastrointestinal tract (GI) tract is one of the main organs exposed to particulate matter (PM) directly through ingestion of contaminated food or indirectly through inhalation. Previous studies have investigated the effects of chronic PM exposure on intestinal epithelia in vitro using Caco-2 cells and in vivo using mice. In this study, we hypothesized that chronic PM exposure would increase epithelial permeability and decrease barrier function due to altered redox homeostasis, which alters levels and/or localization of barrier-associated proteins in human three-dimensional (3D) intestinal tissues. (2) Methods: Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in tissues exposed to 50, 100, 150, 250, and 500 µg/cm2 of PM for 1 week and 2 weeks was analyzed. Levels and localization of tight junction proteins zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and claudin-1 and desmosome-associated desmocollin were analyzed using immunofluorescence. As a marker of oxidative stress, levels of 4-hydroxy-nonenal (4HNE) adducts were measured. (3) Results: No differences in TEER measurements were observed between exposed and un-exposed tissues. However, increased levels of 4HNE adducts in exposed tissues were observed. Additionally, decreased levels of ZO-1, claudin-1, and desmocollin were demonstrated. (4) Conclusion: These data suggest that chronic PM exposure results in an increase of oxidative stress; modified levels of barrier-associated proteins could possibly link to GI tract inflammatory conditions. SN - 1660-4601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32384765/Particulate_Matter_Decreases_Intestinal_Barrier_Associated_Proteins_Levels_in_3D_Human_Intestinal_Model_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijerph17093234 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -