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Intracranial Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Cerebral Paragonimiasis in Pediatric Patients.
Pediatr Neurol. 2020 Aug; 109:47-51.PN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We investigated the proportion of pediatric patients with cerebral paragonimiasis and intracranial hemorrhage who have intracranial pseudoaneurysms.

METHODS

Images of 17 pediatric patients with cerebral paragonimiasis that first manifested as secondary intracranial hemorrhage were evaluated. All patients underwent computed tomographic angiography before surgery. A diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis was confirmed based on a positive Paragonimus-specific antibody test in serum samples from all 17 patients. Cerebral paragonimiasis in five of the 17 patients was further confirmed by histopathological examination of surgical specimens.

RESULTS

Computed tomographic angiographic images for six of the 17 patients (35.3%) showed the presence of intracranial pseudoaneurysms. Follow-up computed tomographic angiographic scans two years later showed that two of the six patients had persistent pseudoaneurysms and underwent aneurysmectomy. The diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm was confirmed by histopathological examination postsurgery. In another two of the six patients, the pseudoaneurysm lesions were absorbed and could no longer be seen on three- to six-month follow-up scans. The final two patients with pseudoaneurysms are still under follow-up. Intracranial pseudoaneurysms with various degrees of surrounding hemorrhage were frequently observed at first manifestation.

CONCLUSIONS

The rupture of intracranial pseudoaneurysms is a common characteristic feature of secondary intracranial hemorrhage caused by cerebral paragonimiasis in pediatric patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery; Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders; National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders; China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders; Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics; Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, P.R. China.Department of Radiology; Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders; National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders; China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders; Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics; Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, P.R. China.Department of Pathology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, P.R. China.Department of Neurosurgery; Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders; National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders; China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders; Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics; Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, P.R. China.Department of Radiology; Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders; National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders; China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders; Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics; Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, P.R. China.Department of Radiology; Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders; National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders; China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders; Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics; Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, P.R. China.Department of Neurosurgery; Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Child Development and Disorders; National Clinical Research Center for Child Health and Disorders; China International Science and Technology Cooperation Base of Child Development and Critical Disorders; Chongqing Key Laboratory of Pediatrics; Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, P.R. China. Electronic address: liangping868@sina.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32386792

Citation

Li, Lusheng, et al. "Intracranial Pseudoaneurysm Caused By Cerebral Paragonimiasis in Pediatric Patients." Pediatric Neurology, vol. 109, 2020, pp. 47-51.
Li L, Zhang Y, Zhu J, et al. Intracranial Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Cerebral Paragonimiasis in Pediatric Patients. Pediatr Neurol. 2020;109:47-51.
Li, L., Zhang, Y., Zhu, J., Zhai, X., Cai, J., He, L., & Liang, P. (2020). Intracranial Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Cerebral Paragonimiasis in Pediatric Patients. Pediatric Neurology, 109, 47-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2020.03.018
Li L, et al. Intracranial Pseudoaneurysm Caused By Cerebral Paragonimiasis in Pediatric Patients. Pediatr Neurol. 2020;109:47-51. PubMed PMID: 32386792.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intracranial Pseudoaneurysm Caused by Cerebral Paragonimiasis in Pediatric Patients. AU - Li,Lusheng, AU - Zhang,Yuting, AU - Zhu,Jin, AU - Zhai,Xuan, AU - Cai,Jinhua, AU - He,Ling, AU - Liang,Ping, Y1 - 2020/04/08/ PY - 2019/09/06/received PY - 2020/03/24/revised PY - 2020/03/28/accepted PY - 2020/5/11/pubmed PY - 2020/5/11/medline PY - 2020/5/11/entrez KW - Cerebral paragonimiasis KW - Computed tomography angiography KW - Intracranial hemorrhage KW - Pediatric KW - Pseudoaneurysm SP - 47 EP - 51 JF - Pediatric neurology JO - Pediatr. Neurol. VL - 109 N2 - BACKGROUND: We investigated the proportion of pediatric patients with cerebral paragonimiasis and intracranial hemorrhage who have intracranial pseudoaneurysms. METHODS: Images of 17 pediatric patients with cerebral paragonimiasis that first manifested as secondary intracranial hemorrhage were evaluated. All patients underwent computed tomographic angiography before surgery. A diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis was confirmed based on a positive Paragonimus-specific antibody test in serum samples from all 17 patients. Cerebral paragonimiasis in five of the 17 patients was further confirmed by histopathological examination of surgical specimens. RESULTS: Computed tomographic angiographic images for six of the 17 patients (35.3%) showed the presence of intracranial pseudoaneurysms. Follow-up computed tomographic angiographic scans two years later showed that two of the six patients had persistent pseudoaneurysms and underwent aneurysmectomy. The diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm was confirmed by histopathological examination postsurgery. In another two of the six patients, the pseudoaneurysm lesions were absorbed and could no longer be seen on three- to six-month follow-up scans. The final two patients with pseudoaneurysms are still under follow-up. Intracranial pseudoaneurysms with various degrees of surrounding hemorrhage were frequently observed at first manifestation. CONCLUSIONS: The rupture of intracranial pseudoaneurysms is a common characteristic feature of secondary intracranial hemorrhage caused by cerebral paragonimiasis in pediatric patients. SN - 1873-5150 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32386792/Intracranial_Pseudoaneurysm_Caused_by_Cerebral_Paragonimiasis_in_Pediatric_Patients L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0887-8994(20)30112-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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