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Varicella seroepidemiology and immunization in a cohort of future healthcare workers in the pre-vaccination era.
Int J Infect Dis. 2020 Jul; 96:228-232.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The goal of this study was to establish the seroprevalence of positive antibodies against varicella and compliance with varicella vaccination in the pre-vaccination era.

METHODS

A cohort of 10 683 Italian students from Padua University Medical School (from 2004 to 2019) were enrolled and classified as unvaccinated, vaccinated once, or vaccinated twice against varicella, according to their vaccination certificate. The antibody titre was measured and the seroprevalence of positive subjects was determined. Subjects with negative or equivocal antibodies were invited for vaccination, and then the antibody titre was retested.

RESULTS

Unvaccinated students were mostly seropositive (95.6%), compared with vaccinated students who were less seropositive (68.0% after one dose and 78.6% after two doses) and had significantly lower antibody titres (p < 0.0001). The post-test vaccination had a positive response rate of 85.4%: 67.4% after one dose and 91.4% after two doses.

CONCLUSIONS

In the pre-vaccination era, only 3.3% of future healthcare workers were vaccinated against varicella (1.1% once and 2.2% twice). Vaccination or revaccination of negative and equivocal individuals could reduce the number of susceptible people. Implementation of varicella vaccine (two doses) in healthcare workers is of primary importance to reduce the risk of transmission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cardiac Thoracic Vascilar Sciences and Public Health, Unit of Occupational Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. Electronic address: andrea.trevisan@unipd.it.Department of Cardiac Thoracic Vascilar Sciences and Public Health, Unit of Occupational Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.Department of Cardiac Thoracic Vascilar Sciences and Public Health, Unit of Occupational Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.Department of Cardiac Thoracic Vascilar Sciences and Public Health, Unit of Occupational Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.Department of Cardiac Thoracic Vascilar Sciences and Public Health, Unit of Occupational Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.Department of Cardiac Thoracic Vascilar Sciences and Public Health, Unit of Occupational Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32387376

Citation

Trevisan, Andrea, et al. "Varicella Seroepidemiology and Immunization in a Cohort of Future Healthcare Workers in the Pre-vaccination Era." International Journal of Infectious Diseases : IJID : Official Publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases, vol. 96, 2020, pp. 228-232.
Trevisan A, Nicolli A, De Nuzzo D, et al. Varicella seroepidemiology and immunization in a cohort of future healthcare workers in the pre-vaccination era. Int J Infect Dis. 2020;96:228-232.
Trevisan, A., Nicolli, A., De Nuzzo, D., Lago, L., Artuso, E., & Maso, S. (2020). Varicella seroepidemiology and immunization in a cohort of future healthcare workers in the pre-vaccination era. International Journal of Infectious Diseases : IJID : Official Publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases, 96, 228-232. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2020.04.082
Trevisan A, et al. Varicella Seroepidemiology and Immunization in a Cohort of Future Healthcare Workers in the Pre-vaccination Era. Int J Infect Dis. 2020;96:228-232. PubMed PMID: 32387376.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Varicella seroepidemiology and immunization in a cohort of future healthcare workers in the pre-vaccination era. AU - Trevisan,Andrea, AU - Nicolli,Annamaria, AU - De Nuzzo,Davide, AU - Lago,Laura, AU - Artuso,Elisa, AU - Maso,Stefano, Y1 - 2020/05/05/ PY - 2020/03/25/received PY - 2020/04/27/revised PY - 2020/04/28/accepted PY - 2020/5/11/pubmed PY - 2020/5/11/medline PY - 2020/5/11/entrez KW - Healthcare workers KW - Medical school students KW - Vaccination KW - Varicella SP - 228 EP - 232 JF - International journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases JO - Int. J. Infect. Dis. VL - 96 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to establish the seroprevalence of positive antibodies against varicella and compliance with varicella vaccination in the pre-vaccination era. METHODS: A cohort of 10 683 Italian students from Padua University Medical School (from 2004 to 2019) were enrolled and classified as unvaccinated, vaccinated once, or vaccinated twice against varicella, according to their vaccination certificate. The antibody titre was measured and the seroprevalence of positive subjects was determined. Subjects with negative or equivocal antibodies were invited for vaccination, and then the antibody titre was retested. RESULTS: Unvaccinated students were mostly seropositive (95.6%), compared with vaccinated students who were less seropositive (68.0% after one dose and 78.6% after two doses) and had significantly lower antibody titres (p < 0.0001). The post-test vaccination had a positive response rate of 85.4%: 67.4% after one dose and 91.4% after two doses. CONCLUSIONS: In the pre-vaccination era, only 3.3% of future healthcare workers were vaccinated against varicella (1.1% once and 2.2% twice). Vaccination or revaccination of negative and equivocal individuals could reduce the number of susceptible people. Implementation of varicella vaccine (two doses) in healthcare workers is of primary importance to reduce the risk of transmission. SN - 1878-3511 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32387376/Varicella_seroepidemiology_and_immunization_in_a_cohort_of_future_healthcare_workers_in_the_pre-vaccination_era L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1201-9712(20)30298-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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