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Eosinophilic Dermatoses: Recognition and Management.
Am J Clin Dermatol. 2020 Aug; 21(4):525-539.AJ

Abstract

Eosinophilic dermatoses encompass a broad spectrum of diseases of different etiologies hallmarked by eosinophilic infiltration of the skin and/or mucous membranes, with or without associated blood eosinophilia. The wide range of dermatological manifestations of this spectrum, including nodules and plaques, pustules, blisters, ulcers, and urticarial lesions, is reflected in a non-univocal classification system. We identified six groups of eosinophilic dermatoses based on the predominant anatomic level of involvement: (1) epidermal; (2) of the dermal-epidermal junction; (3) dermal; (4) of the hypodermis and muscle fascia; (5) of the pilosebaceous unit; and (6) vascular/perivascular. We review clinicopathologic features and management of diseases belonging to each group, particularly: (1) pemphigus herpetiformis and atopic dermatitis as prototypes of the epidermal group; (2) bullous pemphigoid as prototypic eosinophilic dermatosis of the dermal-epidermal junction; (3) eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells syndrome), hypereosinophilic syndromes, Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, eosinophilic dermatosis of hematologic malignancy and chronic spontaneous urticaria as paradigmatic dermal eosinophilic dermatoses; (4) eosinophilic fasciitis as an eosinophilic dermatosis with predominant involvement of the hypodermis and muscle fascia; (5) eosinophilic pustular folliculitis as a model of the pilosebaceous unit involvement; and (6) granuloma faciale, angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, belonging to the vascular/perivascular group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dermatology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. angelo.marzano@unimi.it. Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Pace 9, 20122, Milan, Italy. angelo.marzano@unimi.it.Dermatology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy. Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Pace 9, 20122, Milan, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32394361

Citation

Marzano, Angelo Valerio, and Giovanni Genovese. "Eosinophilic Dermatoses: Recognition and Management." American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, vol. 21, no. 4, 2020, pp. 525-539.
Marzano AV, Genovese G. Eosinophilic Dermatoses: Recognition and Management. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2020;21(4):525-539.
Marzano, A. V., & Genovese, G. (2020). Eosinophilic Dermatoses: Recognition and Management. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 21(4), 525-539. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40257-020-00520-4
Marzano AV, Genovese G. Eosinophilic Dermatoses: Recognition and Management. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2020;21(4):525-539. PubMed PMID: 32394361.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Eosinophilic Dermatoses: Recognition and Management. AU - Marzano,Angelo Valerio, AU - Genovese,Giovanni, PY - 2020/5/13/pubmed PY - 2020/5/13/medline PY - 2020/5/13/entrez SP - 525 EP - 539 JF - American journal of clinical dermatology JO - Am J Clin Dermatol VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - Eosinophilic dermatoses encompass a broad spectrum of diseases of different etiologies hallmarked by eosinophilic infiltration of the skin and/or mucous membranes, with or without associated blood eosinophilia. The wide range of dermatological manifestations of this spectrum, including nodules and plaques, pustules, blisters, ulcers, and urticarial lesions, is reflected in a non-univocal classification system. We identified six groups of eosinophilic dermatoses based on the predominant anatomic level of involvement: (1) epidermal; (2) of the dermal-epidermal junction; (3) dermal; (4) of the hypodermis and muscle fascia; (5) of the pilosebaceous unit; and (6) vascular/perivascular. We review clinicopathologic features and management of diseases belonging to each group, particularly: (1) pemphigus herpetiformis and atopic dermatitis as prototypes of the epidermal group; (2) bullous pemphigoid as prototypic eosinophilic dermatosis of the dermal-epidermal junction; (3) eosinophilic cellulitis (Wells syndrome), hypereosinophilic syndromes, Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, eosinophilic dermatosis of hematologic malignancy and chronic spontaneous urticaria as paradigmatic dermal eosinophilic dermatoses; (4) eosinophilic fasciitis as an eosinophilic dermatosis with predominant involvement of the hypodermis and muscle fascia; (5) eosinophilic pustular folliculitis as a model of the pilosebaceous unit involvement; and (6) granuloma faciale, angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, belonging to the vascular/perivascular group. SN - 1179-1888 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32394361/Eosinophilic_Dermatoses:_Recognition_and_Management L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40257-020-00520-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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