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Comparative study of the substantia nigra echogenicity and 123I-Ioflupane SPECT in patients with synucleinopathies with and without REM sleep behavior disorder.
Sleep Med. 2020 06; 70:116-123.SM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra (SN) and abnormal dopamine transporter-single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) are biomarkers commonly used in the assessment of prodromal synucleinopathy. Our goals were as follows: (1) to compare echogenicity of SN in idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) behavior disorder (iRBD), Parkinson's disease (PD) without RBD (PD-noRBD), PD with RBD (PD + RBD), and control subjects; and (2) to examine association between SN degeneration assessed by DAT-SPECT and SN echogenicity.

PATIENTS/METHODS

A total of 61 subjects with confirmed iRBD were examined using Movement Disorders Society-unified PD rating scale (MDS-UPDRS), TCS (transcranial sonography) and DAT-SPECT. The results were compared with 44 patients with PD (25% PD + RBD) and with 120 age-matched healthy subjects.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSION

The abnormal SN area was found in 75.5% PD, 23% iRBD and 7.3% controls. Median SN echogenicity area in PD (0.27 ± 0.22 cm2) was higher compared to iRBD (0.07 ± 0.07 cm2; p < 0.0001) and controls (0.05 ± 0.03 cm2; p < 0.0001). SN echogenicity in PD + RBD was not significantly different from PD-noRBD (0.30 vs. 0.22, p = 0.15). Abnormal DAT-SPECT was found in 16 iRBD (25.4%) and 44 PD subjects (100%). No correlation between the larger SN area and corresponding putaminal binding index was found in iRBD (r = -0.13, p = 0.29), nor in PD (r = -0.19, p = 0.22). The results of our study showed that: (1) SN echogenicity area in iRBD was higher compared to controls, but the hyperechogenicity was present only in a minority of iRBD patients; (2) SN echogenicity and DAT-SPECT binding index did not correlate in either group; and (3) SN echogenicity does not differ between PD with/without RBD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic. Electronic address: jana.maskova@vfn.cz.Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic; Department of Neurology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic.Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.Institute of Nuclear Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.Institute of Nuclear Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.Department of Biomedical Informatics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, Czech Republic.Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.Department of Neurology and Center of Clinical Neuroscience, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic; Department of Radiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital Prague, Czech Republic.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32403038

Citation

Mašková, J, et al. "Comparative Study of the Substantia Nigra Echogenicity and 123I-Ioflupane SPECT in Patients With Synucleinopathies With and Without REM Sleep Behavior Disorder." Sleep Medicine, vol. 70, 2020, pp. 116-123.
Mašková J, Školoudík D, Štofaniková P, et al. Comparative study of the substantia nigra echogenicity and 123I-Ioflupane SPECT in patients with synucleinopathies with and without REM sleep behavior disorder. Sleep Med. 2020;70:116-123.
Mašková, J., Školoudík, D., Štofaniková, P., Ibarburu, V., Kemlink, D., Zogala, D., Trnka, J., Krupička, R., Šonka, K., Růžička, E., & Dušek, P. (2020). Comparative study of the substantia nigra echogenicity and 123I-Ioflupane SPECT in patients with synucleinopathies with and without REM sleep behavior disorder. Sleep Medicine, 70, 116-123. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleep.2020.02.012
Mašková J, et al. Comparative Study of the Substantia Nigra Echogenicity and 123I-Ioflupane SPECT in Patients With Synucleinopathies With and Without REM Sleep Behavior Disorder. Sleep Med. 2020;70:116-123. PubMed PMID: 32403038.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparative study of the substantia nigra echogenicity and 123I-Ioflupane SPECT in patients with synucleinopathies with and without REM sleep behavior disorder. AU - Mašková,J, AU - Školoudík,D, AU - Štofaniková,P, AU - Ibarburu,V, AU - Kemlink,D, AU - Zogala,D, AU - Trnka,J, AU - Krupička,R, AU - Šonka,K, AU - Růžička,E, AU - Dušek,P, Y1 - 2020/02/28/ PY - 2019/11/06/received PY - 2020/01/16/revised PY - 2020/02/14/accepted PY - 2020/5/14/pubmed PY - 2021/6/1/medline PY - 2020/5/14/entrez KW - Dopamine transporter imaging KW - Idiopathic rapid-eye-movement sleep behavior disorder KW - Neuroimaging KW - Parkinson's disease KW - Substantia nigra hyperechogenicity KW - Transcranial sonography SP - 116 EP - 123 JF - Sleep medicine JO - Sleep Med VL - 70 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra (SN) and abnormal dopamine transporter-single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) are biomarkers commonly used in the assessment of prodromal synucleinopathy. Our goals were as follows: (1) to compare echogenicity of SN in idiopathic rapid eye movement (REM) behavior disorder (iRBD), Parkinson's disease (PD) without RBD (PD-noRBD), PD with RBD (PD + RBD), and control subjects; and (2) to examine association between SN degeneration assessed by DAT-SPECT and SN echogenicity. PATIENTS/METHODS: A total of 61 subjects with confirmed iRBD were examined using Movement Disorders Society-unified PD rating scale (MDS-UPDRS), TCS (transcranial sonography) and DAT-SPECT. The results were compared with 44 patients with PD (25% PD + RBD) and with 120 age-matched healthy subjects. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The abnormal SN area was found in 75.5% PD, 23% iRBD and 7.3% controls. Median SN echogenicity area in PD (0.27 ± 0.22 cm2) was higher compared to iRBD (0.07 ± 0.07 cm2; p < 0.0001) and controls (0.05 ± 0.03 cm2; p < 0.0001). SN echogenicity in PD + RBD was not significantly different from PD-noRBD (0.30 vs. 0.22, p = 0.15). Abnormal DAT-SPECT was found in 16 iRBD (25.4%) and 44 PD subjects (100%). No correlation between the larger SN area and corresponding putaminal binding index was found in iRBD (r = -0.13, p = 0.29), nor in PD (r = -0.19, p = 0.22). The results of our study showed that: (1) SN echogenicity area in iRBD was higher compared to controls, but the hyperechogenicity was present only in a minority of iRBD patients; (2) SN echogenicity and DAT-SPECT binding index did not correlate in either group; and (3) SN echogenicity does not differ between PD with/without RBD. SN - 1878-5506 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32403038/Comparative_study_of_the_substantia_nigra_echogenicity_and_123I_Ioflupane_SPECT_in_patients_with_synucleinopathies_with_and_without_REM_sleep_behavior_disorder_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1389-9457(20)30085-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -