Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Infection of bat and human intestinal organoids by SARS-CoV-2.
Nat Med. 2020 07; 26(7):1077-1083.NMed

Abstract

A novel coronavirus-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-emerged in humans in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and has since disseminated globally1,2. As of April 16, 2020, the confirmed case count of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had surpassed 2 million. Based on full-genome sequence analysis, SARS-CoV-2 shows high homology to SARS-related coronaviruses identified in horseshoe bats1,2. Here we show the establishment and characterization of expandable intestinal organoids derived from horseshoe bats of the Rhinolophus sinicus species that can recapitulate bat intestinal epithelium. These bat enteroids are fully susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and sustain robust viral replication. Development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some patients with COVID-19 and detection of viral RNA in fecal specimens suggest that SARS-CoV-2 might cause enteric, in addition to respiratory, infection3,4. Here we demonstrate active replication of SARS-CoV-2 in human intestinal organoids and isolation of infectious virus from the stool specimen of a patient with diarrheal COVID-19. Collectively, we established the first expandable organoid culture system of bat intestinal epithelium and present evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can infect bat intestinal cells. The robust SARS-CoV-2 replication in human intestinal organoids suggests that the human intestinal tract might be a transmission route of SARS-CoV-2.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. jiezhou@hku.hk. Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. jiezhou@hku.hk.Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.Department of Surgery, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.Department of Surgery, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.Department of Medicine and Geriatrics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Hong Kong, China.Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. Carol Yu Centre for Infection, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. Carol Yu Centre for Infection, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. kyyuen@hku.hk. Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. kyyuen@hku.hk. Carol Yu Centre for Infection, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, China. kyyuen@hku.hk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32405028

Citation

Zhou, Jie, et al. "Infection of Bat and Human Intestinal Organoids By SARS-CoV-2." Nature Medicine, vol. 26, no. 7, 2020, pp. 1077-1083.
Zhou J, Li C, Liu X, et al. Infection of bat and human intestinal organoids by SARS-CoV-2. Nat Med. 2020;26(7):1077-1083.
Zhou, J., Li, C., Liu, X., Chiu, M. C., Zhao, X., Wang, D., Wei, Y., Lee, A., Zhang, A. J., Chu, H., Cai, J. P., Yip, C. C., Chan, I. H., Wong, K. K., Tsang, O. T., Chan, K. H., Chan, J. F., To, K. K., Chen, H., & Yuen, K. Y. (2020). Infection of bat and human intestinal organoids by SARS-CoV-2. Nature Medicine, 26(7), 1077-1083. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-0912-6
Zhou J, et al. Infection of Bat and Human Intestinal Organoids By SARS-CoV-2. Nat Med. 2020;26(7):1077-1083. PubMed PMID: 32405028.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infection of bat and human intestinal organoids by SARS-CoV-2. AU - Zhou,Jie, AU - Li,Cun, AU - Liu,Xiaojuan, AU - Chiu,Man Chun, AU - Zhao,Xiaoyu, AU - Wang,Dong, AU - Wei,Yuxuan, AU - Lee,Andrew, AU - Zhang,Anna Jinxia, AU - Chu,Hin, AU - Cai,Jian-Piao, AU - Yip,Cyril Chik-Yan, AU - Chan,Ivy Hau-Yee, AU - Wong,Kenneth Kak-Yuen, AU - Tsang,Owen Tak-Yin, AU - Chan,Kwok-Hung, AU - Chan,Jasper Fuk-Woo, AU - To,Kelvin Kai-Wang, AU - Chen,Honglin, AU - Yuen,Kwok Yung, Y1 - 2020/05/13/ PY - 2020/03/06/received PY - 2020/04/24/accepted PY - 2020/5/15/pubmed PY - 2020/7/23/medline PY - 2020/5/15/entrez SP - 1077 EP - 1083 JF - Nature medicine JO - Nat. Med. VL - 26 IS - 7 N2 - A novel coronavirus-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-emerged in humans in Wuhan, China, in December 2019 and has since disseminated globally1,2. As of April 16, 2020, the confirmed case count of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) had surpassed 2 million. Based on full-genome sequence analysis, SARS-CoV-2 shows high homology to SARS-related coronaviruses identified in horseshoe bats1,2. Here we show the establishment and characterization of expandable intestinal organoids derived from horseshoe bats of the Rhinolophus sinicus species that can recapitulate bat intestinal epithelium. These bat enteroids are fully susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and sustain robust viral replication. Development of gastrointestinal symptoms in some patients with COVID-19 and detection of viral RNA in fecal specimens suggest that SARS-CoV-2 might cause enteric, in addition to respiratory, infection3,4. Here we demonstrate active replication of SARS-CoV-2 in human intestinal organoids and isolation of infectious virus from the stool specimen of a patient with diarrheal COVID-19. Collectively, we established the first expandable organoid culture system of bat intestinal epithelium and present evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can infect bat intestinal cells. The robust SARS-CoV-2 replication in human intestinal organoids suggests that the human intestinal tract might be a transmission route of SARS-CoV-2. SN - 1546-170X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32405028/Infection_of_bat_and_human_intestinal_organoids_by_SARS_CoV_2_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41591-020-0912-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -