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Long-Lasting Insecticide-Treated Nets: Assessment of the Awareness and Utilization of Them among Antenatal Clinic Attendees in Abakaliki, Southeast Nigeria.
J Trop Med. 2020; 2020:2984867.JT

Abstract

Background

The use of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLITNs) is one of the effective strategies for the prevention of malaria, especially among pregnant women.

Aim

This study is aimed at assessing the awareness and utilization of LLITNs during pregnancy among antenatal clinic attendees at the Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital Abakaliki.

Materials and Methods

This was a cross-sectional study among antenatal attendees at the Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, Ebonyi State. A semistructured questionnaire was used to obtain relevant information from the participants. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 20.

Results

The mean age of the women was 26.05 ± 5.76 years. About one-third (30%) of the respondents were nulliparous. Most of the respondents had at least a secondary education. More than ninety percent of the respondents had a good knowledge of malaria with 95.8% being aware of LLITNs. The main source of information was from hospitals (54.5%). The rate of utilization of LLITNs was 37.5%; however, consistent use was only reported by about a third of this proportion. The major reasons for not utilizing the nets include discomfort/heat and fear of the chemical content. Women with tertiary education were more likely to utilize mosquito nets during pregnancy compared with women with secondary or primary education. Women who live in rural areas (OR = 0.393 95% CI 0.602-0.073) were less likely to use LLITNs during pregnancy, while those who are aware of the aetiology of malaria (OR = 4.38 95% CI 0.983-19.591) were more likely to utilize LLITNs in pregnancy.

Conclusion

The level of awareness of LLITNs is high; however, its utilization was discouragingly low. Rural dwellers and those without appropriate knowledge of the aetiology of malaria were less likely to use LLITNs in pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, PMB 102, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, PMB 102, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Medical Centre, Owerri, P.O. Box 1010, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, PMB 102, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, PMB 102, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, PMB 102, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.Department of Administration, Federal Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, PMB 102, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

32411254

Citation

Anikwe, Chidebe Christian, et al. "Long-Lasting Insecticide-Treated Nets: Assessment of the Awareness and Utilization of Them Among Antenatal Clinic Attendees in Abakaliki, Southeast Nigeria." Journal of Tropical Medicine, vol. 2020, 2020, p. 2984867.
Anikwe CC, Irechukwu JC, Okorochukwu BC, et al. Long-Lasting Insecticide-Treated Nets: Assessment of the Awareness and Utilization of Them among Antenatal Clinic Attendees in Abakaliki, Southeast Nigeria. J Trop Med. 2020;2020:2984867.
Anikwe, C. C., Irechukwu, J. C., Okorochukwu, B. C., Ikeoha, C. C., Obuna, J. A., Ejikeme, B. N., & Anikwe, I. H. (2020). Long-Lasting Insecticide-Treated Nets: Assessment of the Awareness and Utilization of Them among Antenatal Clinic Attendees in Abakaliki, Southeast Nigeria. Journal of Tropical Medicine, 2020, 2984867. https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/2984867
Anikwe CC, et al. Long-Lasting Insecticide-Treated Nets: Assessment of the Awareness and Utilization of Them Among Antenatal Clinic Attendees in Abakaliki, Southeast Nigeria. J Trop Med. 2020;2020:2984867. PubMed PMID: 32411254.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-Lasting Insecticide-Treated Nets: Assessment of the Awareness and Utilization of Them among Antenatal Clinic Attendees in Abakaliki, Southeast Nigeria. AU - Anikwe,Chidebe Christian, AU - Irechukwu,John Chiadikobi, AU - Okorochukwu,Bartholomew Chukwunonye, AU - Ikeoha,Cyril Chijioke, AU - Obuna,Johnson Akuma, AU - Ejikeme,Brown Nnamdi, AU - Anikwe,Ifeyinwa Helen, Y1 - 2020/04/30/ PY - 2019/09/06/received PY - 2020/03/23/accepted PY - 2020/5/16/entrez PY - 2020/5/16/pubmed PY - 2020/5/16/medline SP - 2984867 EP - 2984867 JF - Journal of tropical medicine JO - J Trop Med VL - 2020 N2 - Background: The use of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLITNs) is one of the effective strategies for the prevention of malaria, especially among pregnant women. Aim: This study is aimed at assessing the awareness and utilization of LLITNs during pregnancy among antenatal clinic attendees at the Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital Abakaliki. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study among antenatal attendees at the Alex Ekwueme Federal University Teaching Hospital Abakaliki, Ebonyi State. A semistructured questionnaire was used to obtain relevant information from the participants. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 20. Results: The mean age of the women was 26.05 ± 5.76 years. About one-third (30%) of the respondents were nulliparous. Most of the respondents had at least a secondary education. More than ninety percent of the respondents had a good knowledge of malaria with 95.8% being aware of LLITNs. The main source of information was from hospitals (54.5%). The rate of utilization of LLITNs was 37.5%; however, consistent use was only reported by about a third of this proportion. The major reasons for not utilizing the nets include discomfort/heat and fear of the chemical content. Women with tertiary education were more likely to utilize mosquito nets during pregnancy compared with women with secondary or primary education. Women who live in rural areas (OR = 0.393 95% CI 0.602-0.073) were less likely to use LLITNs during pregnancy, while those who are aware of the aetiology of malaria (OR = 4.38 95% CI 0.983-19.591) were more likely to utilize LLITNs in pregnancy. Conclusion: The level of awareness of LLITNs is high; however, its utilization was discouragingly low. Rural dwellers and those without appropriate knowledge of the aetiology of malaria were less likely to use LLITNs in pregnancy. SN - 1687-9686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/32411254/Long_Lasting_Insecticide_Treated_Nets:_Assessment_of_the_Awareness_and_Utilization_of_Them_among_Antenatal_Clinic_Attendees_in_Abakaliki_Southeast_Nigeria_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/2984867 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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